Category: tpborlpufejx

Pharmalittle: Moderna Covid-19 vaccine is effective in adolescents; U.S. lawmakers pitch a bill to create ‘biobonds’

first_img By Ed Silverman May 25, 2021 Reprints Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Alex Hogan/STAT Log In | Learn More Good morning, everyone, and how are you today? We are doing just fine, thank you, despite the cloudy skies looming over the Pharmalot campus, where things have settled down now that the short person is hunched over a laptop and the official mascot has assumed his formal snoozing positions. As for us, we are dutifully concocting a few needed cups of stimulation as we dig in for another busy day. No doubt, you can relate. So time to get cracking. As always, we have assembled some items of interest. So hoist your own cup to a successful day, and drop us a line when something interesting arises. …Moderna (MRNA) reported that its Covid-19 vaccine was effective in children aged 12 to 17 in a new study, a finding that could clear the way for a second shot for use in adolescents, The Associated Press writes. The company said the vaccine induced immune responses among children that were comparable to those seen in a study of adults last year. There were no cases of symptomatic Covid-19 among vaccine recipients, suggesting 100% vaccine efficacy in adolescents, though overall very few among the 3,700 children in the study got sick. GET STARTED What is it? [email protected] What’s included?center_img Ed Silverman STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. About the Author Reprints Tags STAT+ Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Pharmalot @Pharmalot Pharmalittle: Moderna Covid-19 vaccine is effective in adolescents; U.S. lawmakers pitch a bill to create ‘biobonds’ last_img read more

Read More

Florida reports deadliest day since the COVID-19 pandemic began

first_imgOver 1,000 unemployment claim call takers let go as DEO cancels contract June 12, 2021 FORT MYERS, Fla. — The Florida Department of Health reported the highest number of deaths in a single day since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic. On Friday, Jan. 22, the FLDOH reported that 394 people died of COVID-19. The grim milestone surpassed the previous record of 277 deaths reported on August 11.Although the health department reported 394 deaths on Friday, that doesn’t necessarily mean that all those people died yesterday as there is a delay in reporting deaths.CLICK HERE to view the Jan. 22 coronavirus case totals for Southwest Florida. RELATEDTOPICS AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 commentsDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments Advertisement Two suffer shark bites off Florida beach June 16, 2021 Florida moves against foreign theft of intellectual property June 8, 2021 AdvertisementTags: Covid daily totalsdeathsFlorida Florida nursing homes report COVID-19 infection rates nearly double the national average June 16, 2021last_img read more

Read More

Stimulus package breaks new ground in European unity

first_img Keywords Europe,  Coronavirus,  Economy David McHugh Related news Two decisions — shared borrowing, and simply handing out much of the money as grants — broke longstanding resistance from some of the financially stronger countries to exposing their finances and taxpayers to troubles in southern Europe where bureaucracy and red tape continue to slow growth. Germany, which had long resisted shared borrowing, played a decisive role by changing its approach in the face of the crisis as Merkel pressed for a deal.“With the biggest-ever effort of cross-border solidarity, the EU is sending a strong signal of internal cohesion,” said Holger Schmieding, chief economist at Berenberg bank. “Near-term, the confidence effect can matter even more than the money itself.”The EU’s executive commission predicts the bloc’s economy will shrink by 8.7% this year and rebound by 6.1% next year. The goal of the spending is to support that upswing.By turning to shared debt and spending, the EU is taking a different approach to solidarity than it did during the debt crisis that pushed Greece and four other members of the 19-country euro currency union into international bailouts in 2010-2015. Greece was rescued with loans that have to be repaid, increasing its debt load. That help came with tough conditions to rein in government spending that reduced growth, spread hardship and fueled resentment.The four-day meeting nevertheless put the bloc’s deep-seated fault lines on display. To overcome resistance from five European countries led by the Netherlands, they trimmed the amounts to be dispensed as grants and increased the amount offered as loans that have to be paid back. The money will not kick in until next year and the fund is a one-off, meaning that while it sets an important precedent it does not necessarily lead to ongoing mutual support that could be counted on in any future crisis.The grant provision is important because it will enable countries like Italy and Spain to spend more on their economies without adding to their national debt piles. Both were hard hit by the virus outbreak and Italy in particular has a large debt burden that must be regularly rolled over with new borrowing. A huge spike in debt could deter bond markets from lending at affordable rates.Resistance from the Netherlands, Austria, Sweden, Finland and Denmark reflects skepticism about the pace of economic reform in the countries that need help.Yet the trillions in financial support are starting to add up. Although the European response is spread across EU institutions, the European Central Bank, and the individual nation’s governments, economists say the stimulus figure is weighty enough to impress international investors so they will keep lending to indebted countries such as Italy and avoid another debt crisis.The 750 billion euro recovery fund comes on top of a 1.1 trillion euro EU budget that pays for the union’s agricultural support, projects to help poorer members catch up and myriad other programs. That, in turn, follows up to 540 billion euros in aid for wage support programs to hold down unemployment, and credit lines that hard-hit countries could tap from the eurozone’s bailout fund. Another 1.35 trillion euros is being printed by the European Central Bank and injected into the economy through a series of bond purchases that hold down market borrowing costs for businesses, governments and consumers. It’s those bond purchases that have kept the virus crisis from turning into a financial crisis while EU leaders debated.Grants based on common borrowing “is an enormous step towards solidarity in Europe,” wrote economists Bert Colijn and Carsten Brzeski at ING bank. “From a positive perspective, the fact that government leaders negotiated to the bitter end to find a deal and did not simply decide to postpone the decision shows that all of them saw the sense of urgency,” they said in a research note.“From a more negative perspective, the hard-fought compromise will have smashed some political porcelain and has not always sent a signal of strong unity. Only time will tell which of these two perspectives will become the dominant narrative in financial markets.” Economy grew at 5.6% annual rate in first quarter of year, Statistics Canada says Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Covid vaccine-sharing discussions to dominate G7 summit talks Digital shift cushioned blow to post-pandemic growth outlook, BoC deputy says European leaders took a historic step towards sharing financial burdens among the EU’s 27 countries by agreeing to borrow and spend together to pull the economy out of the deep recession caused by the virus outbreak.Pushed by Germany’s Angela Merkel and France’s Emmanuel Macron, leaders agreed to borrow together by selling bonds, using the European Union’s collective strong credit rating to borrow at low interest costs. The money will fill a 750 billion-euro ($855 billion) recovery fund that will boost the hoped for economic rebound next year and restore growth and jobs lost in this year’s plunge. 97461520 - flag of the european union eu and euro banknotes 123RF Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

Read More

Key Initiatives for Education Outlined at National Planning Summit General Assembly

first_imgKey Initiatives for Education Outlined at National Planning Summit General Assembly EducationFebruary 5, 2009 RelatedKey Initiatives for Education Outlined at National Planning Summit General Assembly RelatedKey Initiatives for Education Outlined at National Planning Summit General Assembly RelatedKey Initiatives for Education Outlined at National Planning Summit General Assemblycenter_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Several new initiatives are to be put in place to improve the delivery of education. Details of these initiatives were outlined recently by the National Planning Summit Expert Team headed by Minister of Education, Andrew Holness.The areas include the establishment of a National Education Inspectorate (NEI); National Education Trust and a National Parenting Support Commission.The recent National Planning Summit General Assembly was convened by the Programme Management Office (PMO) in the Office of the Prime Minister. The summit brought together expert teams of Government and private sector planners who gave reports on achievements in the areas of job creation, tax reform, debt reduction, investment promotion, education and training, crime and violence, governance and bureaucracy and development approvals.The Expert Team on Education, had valuable input from the private sector as President of the Jamaica Chamber of Commerce, Milton Samuda and CEO of Red Stripe, Mark McKenzie, gave their perspectives, as employers, to the deliberations of the team.This is a part of the “fresh new” approach that Government has been taking to drive the implementation of the National Planning Summit (NPS) initiatives in an effort to spur economic growth and development.The National Education Inspectorate (NEI) is expected to bring greater accountability of the education system by providing a rigorous, independent evaluation of standards and quality of delivery in education institutions. The NEI is now a project within the Education Transformation Team of the Ministry of Education. A Chief Inspector, Mrs. Elaine Foster-Allen is in place and scoping of inspection programmes has started.Among the other initiatives being implemented by the Ministry of Education, is a Trust that will be established to be a secure source for on-going, long-term capital investment and infrastructure development in education. A part of the function of the Trust will be managing a National Education Endowment Fund. The Trust is expected to be the focal point through which the Ministry interfaces with the Diaspora and international organisations to raise donations for education infrastructure.Acknowledging that parents are a child’s first and most important teachers, the Expert Committees reported that a National Parenting Support Commission Bill has been drafted by the Office of the Chief Parliamentary Council and the policy is at the White Paper stage. Advertisementslast_img read more

Read More

An extra $25 million for Australia’s creative sector to RISE

first_imgAn extra $25 million for Australia’s creative sector to RISE Australia’s creative and entertainment sector has received a major uplift, with the Morrison Government announcing that $25 million will be shared by 66 leading organisations across the country, under the third batch of grants from the $200 million Restart Investment to Sustain and Expand (RISE) Fund.Making the announcement this morning from Brisbane’s Tivoli Theatre, Minister for Communications, Urban Infrastructure, Cities and the Arts, the Hon Paul Fletcher MP, said the latest funding would begin to flow immediately to rejuvenate live performance venues and events, creating more than 25,000 employment opportunities across the country.“We understand the widespread disruption to creative organisations from the pandemic, which is why the Morrison Government is pleased to inject more than $25 million through Batch Three of the RISE Fund,” Minister Fletcher said.“This funding is an important step in the rejuvenation of Australia’s arts sector from COVID-19, and will support our much-loved venues putting on activities such as festivals, concerts, tours, productions and events, particularly in regional and remote areas.“Tivoli Theatre is one of the 66 organisations benefiting from Batch Three, with a $577,000 grant to bring a dynamic program of accessible and immersive music and arts events to Brisbane over winter this year, creating more than 460 employment opportunities.”The investment into these leading organisations being announced today brings to a cumulative $100 million the Government has committed through the RISE Fund to date. This funding has created over 89,000 job opportunities and expanded cultural and creative experiences for audiences across Australia.One of the largest grant recipients is Moulin Rouge! The Musical, which will receive $1.1 million to adapt Baz Luhrmann’s 2001 Australian film to a stage show, creating more than 100 jobs for an all-Australian cast and crew.Australia’s premier music festival Splendour will receive $1 million towards its 2021 festival in NSW, creating more than 1,300 employment opportunities.The Pangaea Festival will receive more than $200,000 to deliver an inter-generational immersive cultural event highlighting local, national, indigenous and international music artists, performances, circus and visual art. The Festival will take place over three days on Tasmania’s east coast in the summer of 2022, creating more than 200 job opportunities.Western Australia’s Barking Gecko Theatre will also receive $570,000 to develop professional artists in regional and remote communities, create new ensembles in new locations, and to complete artistic work in repertoire ready for touring from 2023.Muso – The Rise of The Pub Gig will receive more than $220,000 to revitalise the live music sector, working with over 100 venues Australia-wide to put on more than 500 local gigs for metro and regional communities. The project will create more than 1,300 job opportunities across Victoria, Tasmania, NSW, Queensland, SA and WA.In March 2020, the Morrison Government announced the RISE program would receive an extra $125 million to support around 230 projects, building on an original commitment of $75 million. In November 2020, the Morrison Government committed more than $60 million in the first batch of the RISE Fund, and in March 2021, $15 million under Batch Two of the Fund. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:AusPol, Australia, Australian, Brisbane, communications, Government, infrastructure, Morrison, Morrison Government, NSW, Queensland, regional development, remote communities, SA, Tasmania, Tassie, Victoria, WA, Western Australialast_img read more

Read More

Spring 1999 Graduates Entering Strong Job Market

first_imgGraduates in the class of 1999 are entering a strong job market similar to the last two years, according to Gordon Gray, University of Colorado at Boulder Career Services director. “The number of employer interactions with students on campus is unprecedented, ” said Gray. “Increases in job postings, resume referrals, interviews and attendance at career fairs reflect a strong market nationally and locally. “The Colorado unemployment rate has never been lower. There are many companies hiring and needing the skills of college graduates,” Gray said. Opportunities exist for college graduates in all fields. Employers tell Career Services counselors that any college degree lets them know that the candidate is a smart person and can learn and acquire skills to perform specific jobs. “It’s a favorable situation for liberal arts college students,” Gray said. “They can study what they love and have the option of switching fields at graduation. A liberal arts graduate can go to work for a computer systems company and make big bucks. Their passion often doesn’t fit a job opening, but their skills are transferable.” The most heavily recruited fields are computer science, electrical engineering, electrical computer engineering and business degrees. “Graduates in the heavily recruited fields are getting job offers with starting salaries over $40,000, in addition to relocation and signing bonuses,” Gray said. Non-profit and social service positions usually pay less, but the jobs are there. The good economy and a rise in contributions to social service agencies are translating into more jobs in those fields. Teacher aspirants are also finding jobs. Openings have increased as baby boom teachers retire and children from the recent baby boom enter school. What skills are employers looking for in a college graduate? The top three are interpersonal, teamwork and analytical skills, followed by oral and written communication, computer and leadership skills and experience. The top personal characteristics desired in employees are honesty and integrity, motivation and initiative, self-confidence, flexibility, a strong work ethic, enthusiasm, ethics and energy. Employers also value skills attained through involvement in student clubs and organizations and other extra-curricular activities, such as leadership, committee work and service. Internship experience most often can give a graduate the edge over other candidates. Off-campus work related to an academic major or career ambitions can help students become more decisive in their career choices and more competitive in the marketplace. CU-Boulder is working to meet the employer demand for interns. Last year the Cooperative Education and Internship program reported 7,743 internship opportunities from 2,325 organizations. More than 65 employers were represented at February’s Internship Fair. Gray advises college students in all classes and majors to make the career planning, preparation and decision-making process part of their college experience. “If a graduating senior shows up in April seeking career assistance, it’s very difficult to help them find work. Career planning is a four-year process,” he said. Career Services offers a career and academic planning calendar to help guide students from their freshman to senior and graduate college levels that includes counseling, workshops, fairs, resume development and internships. For more information call 303-492-6541 or visit the website at www.colorado.edu/careerservices. Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: March 23, 1999 last_img read more

Read More

Student life: Work and play collide

first_imgCategories:AcademicsCampus Community Published: May 4, 2015 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mailcenter_img Work and play collide in the lives of students in CU’s Theatre and Dance Department, where self-expression is the primary driver of professional development.Not only do undergraduate students in BA and BFA programs in Theatre and Dance have the chance to explore nuances in performance, theory and design, but they also become leaders in their chosen fields. The department hosts 4 to 6 performances each semester that incorporate the artistic vision of faculty, visiting artists and students. Undergraduate students have the opportunity to build props and set the stage for CU’s main season performances—and even learn to run the whole show. Connie Lane, the department’s production coordinator, teaches a hands-on course in stage management that introduces students to multiple aspects of production.“Stage managers serve the director’s vision on each specific show,” explains Lane. Student managers maintain a performance’s artistic integrity by involving themselves in production every step of the way. In preparing rehearsal sets to reciting cues, stage managers often work around the clock weeks ahead of a show to ensure all of its elements smoothly fall in place on opening night.Lane’s goal, she says, is to instill “transferable skills” in her students that propel them forward in their desired professions. But there are “intangible” qualities that exist beyond the capabilities of her instruction, among them: instinct, compassion and organization.Two of Lane’s former students, seniors Sarah Baughman and Jamie Holzman, exemplified those skills early on and became stage managers over the course of their academic careers at CU.Baughman, a 22-year-old psychology and theatre major from St. Louis, began her career in theatre during middle school where she worked behind the scenes in technical design and production. She helped manage her first play in the 8th grade. Her responsibilities increased throughout high school and she learned to lead entire shows while at CU.As a freshman, she served as the assistant stage manager in The Loft, a small experimental black box space, and now oversees plays at the University Theatre, says Lane.Baughman led A Broadway Christmas Carol and Jesus Christ Superstar this year and helped build stage sets and props along the way.“The shows are amazing and during [technical rehearsal] when they come together, I think, is the best part,” says Baughman. “You finally have ownership of what you’ve been working up to.”Taking the lead in the production of Jesus Christ Superstar was her biggest accomplishment yet. Twenty-eight performers and more than several crew members and design teams coordinated with her in preparation for the show, which ran for eight consecutive nights.“She’s communicating to 12 people through the course of every show to tell them when to do their cues,” explains Lane.Baughman called over 400 cues—including musical notes—for cast members and design technicians, a skill she’s honed through practice night after night in rehearsal. Her dedication and interpersonal skills that made that work at CU possible are leading her toward a career in theatre. She has applied for a stage management internship after graduation at The Julliard School in New York, a private performing arts conservatory in frequent connection with CU’s faculty and students.Like Baughman, 21-year-old Delaware-native Holzman took strides as an undergraduate to become a leader among her peers. She manages shows hosted by CU’s Dance Division while pursuing a BFA in dance performance. After assisting on the set of a master’s student performance, Holzman studied the ins and outs of stage production throughout her freshman year. Open Space, an annual student dance concert hosted by CU Dance Connection, was the first performance she led as a sophomore.“I really love that it’s active, hands-on work and everyday is different,” explains Holzman, who also managed the student-choreographed show FRESH.CU’s Dance Program offers ten technique classes ranging from jazz to aerial dance. BFA students focus in areas such as movement analysis, performance and pedagogy. As seniors, they choreograph a shared concert with other BFA students. In February, Holzman engendered “The process the ritual,” and wrote an honors thesis examining her creative process.Communicating her artistic vision to other dancers and formulating ways to represent those ideas on paper was the most difficult task she faced in her time at CU, she says. “Challenge is a great opportunity.”Holzman managed the largest production of her career, The Current, during the same week Jesus Christ Superstar premiered. The 7-piece experimental performance exhibited works by CU dance faculty and guest artists. “I really enjoy it because I am a dancer first and a performer first, so it’s easy for me to see cues and to anticipate music,” she says.To help foster management skills in artists like Holzman, Lane teaches students how to work with different personality types. Holzman says she learned more about herself in sending those techniques into practice.She plans to travel through Europe after graduation and, later, create workshops for workers in high-stress environments that involve dance somatics —a field she aspired to pursue while at CU. Somatics courses at CU teach dancers how to become more aware of bodily sensations and prevent injury.“I never even dreamed that I would be dancing in college,” says Holzman. “It just seems like there’s endless possibilities and CU’s dance program teaches us to believe that.”Photo: Theatre & Dance’s Amateur production of Jesus Christ Superstar on April 15, 2015.last_img read more

Read More

Gov. Schweitzer: Ruling is Good for Montana Oil Companies

first_img Email HELENA – Gov. Brian Schweitzer said Tuesday that a recent ruling by the state Public Service Commission means Montana oil companies have a better shot at putting their oil in a proposed pipeline from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico.TransCanada Corp., seeking multistate approval for the 1,980-mile Keystone XL pipeline, has faced political pressure to let Montana and North Dakota crude oil into the pipeline and has said it is considering the plan.Schweitzer says Montana now has a way to force the issue if necessary.In a recent ruling, the Montana Public Service Commission decided it can intervene in connection disputes. If a Montana oil company doesn’t feel like it is getting a fair shot at hooking into the pipeline, it can take a case to the Helena-based PSC.TransCanada, in a statement, took no dispute with the ruling or the governor’s take.Company spokesman James Millar said TransCanada is “very excited with the prospects now of moving Montana and North Dakota oil to markets.”Montana oil producers who don’t have access to a pipeline have to pay as much as $15 to $30 a barrel to ship it by rail, Schweitzer said. A pipeline is a much cheaper way to move crude and would make Montana oil more competitive, he said.Schweitzer said TransCanada has told him it will let Montana oil onto the line, but the PSC ruling means Montana has a way to make sure that happens.“I would say in this case we will trust and we will verify by regulatory authority,” the governor said in an interview. “It is another good day for Montana oil production.”PSC chairman Greg Jergeson said TransCanada agreed to the so-called common carrier status because it sought benefits that go along with it, such as the use of public rights of way.Jergeson said Montana oil companies must try to make an arrangement with TransCanada for hooking into the pipeline, and hash out who pays for those costs and how. If negotiations fail, the PSC can get involved and issue an order.“I think it has enormous potential for companies interested in developing Montana resources to be able to put together their programs in a financially sound basis,” Jergeson said.Schweitzer said he supports the pipeline project, which has run into increasing criticism from environmentalists who argue using crude oil from the Alberta tar sands would increase greenhouse gas emissions.Schweitzer said the pipeline could bring in as much as 5 percent of the country’s oil supply.“It decreases our dependence on these petro-dictators around the world, and that’s good,” Schweitzer said. Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox.last_img read more

Read More

Paul Stuart sweeps up new lease on Broome Street

first_imgBrokers declined to provide asking rents or the term of the deal. But in the area, depending on size and location, rents now range from $100 to $400 per foot, according to sources.The clothier decided to take advantage of what’s been a tumultuous but potentially advantageous retail market for tenants in New York City to open a store to support the collection, according to a spokesperson. Paul Stuart, whose flagship has been open at Madison Avenue and East 45th Street since 1938, also just opened a new store at 50 Main Street in Southampton.Ripco’s Josh Siegelman, who represented the tenant in the deal, says the space is “a good fit” for them as the area has blossomed with other menswear retailers including Suitsupply, Indochino and Golden Goose.“It’s a nice co-tenancy to support what they want to do,” Siegelman said. “It’s a historical, iconic brand and super excited about these new stores and entering the Soho marketplace.”Paul Stuart will replace the Italian brand Michele Negri, which will vacate by the end of August.Deeds show that the small building was owned by developer Harry Macklowe in the 1970s.Goldfarb, who bought the building in 1996, said there were two retailers competing for the spot. Brokers say retailers have come out of a pandemic stupor over the last two weeks to take advantage of the drop in pricing and to start focusing on future occupancies.In May and June, protests over the killing of George Floyd turned violent in some instances. Stores in Soho like the Balenciaga shop on Mercer Street were looted. Many retailers resorted to boarding up their storefronts — some had already done so when they shuttered earlier in the pandemic. Since then, other retailers have begun reopening.Chris Owles and Sarah Shannon of Sinvin represented Goldfarb in the transaction, which started as the virus hit but was just finalized.“There has been softness for a while and it’s created opportunities for brands to enter the market,” Owles said.Update: This article previously misstated Chris Owles’ name. TagsRetailRetail LeasingSoho retail 505 Broome Street (Google Maps)UPDATED, Aug. 15, 2020, 3:28 p.m.: As retail tenants and their landlords battle over unpaid rent, one high-end brand has struck a deal for a new store in Soho.Paul Stuart has signed a lease for 1,000 square feet across a two-level spread at Scott Goldfarb’s 505 Broome Street, according to the deal’s brokers. It is located adjacent to the Oliver Peoples eyewear store at the corner of West Broadway.Known for its menswear, Paul Stuart is opening its first customLAB boutique at the site. Similar to Suitsupply and MySuit, the brand launched the made-to-measure experience last year.Read moreSoho retailers assess damage after lootingLandlords sue big retail as missed rent payments pile upPacSun takes retail space in Soho for NYC debut Share via Shortlink Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlinklast_img read more

Read More

Last day for Develop in Brighton Early Bird tickets

first_imgLast day for Develop in Brighton Early Bird ticketsAnd the 10% GI.biz reader discountDan PearsonWednesday 8th June 2016Share this article Recommend Tweet ShareCompanies in this articleDevelop ConferenceRelated JobsSenior Game Designer – UE4 – AAA United Kingdom Amiqus GamesProgrammer – REMOTE – work with industry veterans! North West Amiqus GamesJunior Video Editor – GLOBAL publisher United Kingdom Amiqus GamesDiscover more jobs in games If you’re looking at attending Develop in Brighton next month, then today is the last day to take advantage of early bird pricing and the extra 10% discount available to GamesIndustry.biz readers.Taking place in Britain’s favourite seaside resort from July 12-14, Develop will be headlined this year by Hideo Kojima, Bossa Studios and Robin Hunicke, assisted by a cast of over 100 speakers across ten different tracks, including two new funding and finance streams. The Games Funding Forum will offer practical, relevant advice for developers of all scales interested in discovering new sources of funding and making the most of existing ones, whilst the Pitching & Funding Workshop is “an all-day practical workshop designed especially for micro studios and start-ups to help prepare for fundraising.”More ticket information can be found on the event’s website. To get your reader discount, simply use the code DEV16GI at checkout.Celebrating employer excellence in the video games industry8th July 2021Submit your company Sign up for The Daily Update and get the best of GamesIndustry.biz in your inbox. Enter your email addressMore storiesSpeaker submissions for Develop:Brighton are now openApplications to speak at October event must be submitted by June 2By Danielle Partis 21 days agoNinja Theory dominates the Develop AwardsMeanwhile, EA’s Jade Raymond recognised with inaugural vanguard award By Haydn Taylor 2 years agoLatest comments Sign in to contributeEmail addressPasswordSign in Need an account? Register now.last_img read more

Read More