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Dublin already the big Brexit winner as financial services firms move business out of London

first_imgMonday 11 March 2019 12:32 am More From Our Partners Kamala Harris keeps list of reporters who don’t ‘understand’ her: reportnypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgPuffer fish snaps a selfie with lucky divernypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.com‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.com whatsapp DUBLIN looks set to be the big winner from Brexit as financial services firms move business away from London and “chip away” at the City’s influence.A study by think tank New Financial found that 269 banking and finance companies have already moved at least part of their business away from London ahead of Britain’s departure from the EU. Callum Keown whatsapp Share But it said that was a significant underestimate and predicted Brexit would “gradually chip away” at the City’s influence both in Europe and around the world, with more staff, business and assets leaving London.Dublin has been chosen as the post-Brexit location of choice by 100 companies, including Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan, Credit Suisse and HSBC, while 60 firms, such as Schroders, Janus Henderson and Aviva Investors chose Luxembourg.The study found that 249 companies had moved primary hubs to the EU, while 213, including the likes of Barclays and Bank of America Merrill Lynch, have set up new entities in the bloc, transferring staff as well as billions of pounds in assets.While more than a third of moves have been to Dublin, banking giants have hedged their bets moving different parts of their operations to different cities.Goldman Sachs has moved its investment banking and markets divisions to Frankfurt and Paris and shifted its asset management arm to Dublin. He said: “All the recent evidence suggests it’s quite clear that London will remain the major financial centre in Europe after Brexit.“Businesses will have to make contingency plans and there will be some changes but there’s no doubt London will maintain that position.” Similarly, Credit Suisse has transferred investment banking to Frankfurt and moved its markets wing to Madrid.However, with firms spreading their business across a number of cities, London’s dominance looks in Europe looks set to continue, it concluded.It said: “While the headline numbers are stark, there is no question that London will remain the dominant financial centre in Europe for the foreseeable future.“Firms are keen to keep as much of their business in London as possible and even the biggest relocations represent a maximum of 10 per cent of the headcount at individual firms.”Gerard Lyons, economist at the challenger wealth manager Netwealth, said the City’s position was not under threat. Dublin already the big Brexit winner as financial services firms move business out of London Tags: Trading Archivelast_img read more

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Using local foods, a Juneau middle school teacher demystifies cooking for kids

first_imgCommunity | Education | Environment | Food | Juneau | Juneau Schools | State GovernmentUsing local foods, a Juneau middle school teacher demystifies cooking for kidsMay 24, 2019 by Zoe Grueskin, KTOO Share:Students in Chris Heidemann’s outdoor life skills class enjoys smoked salmon on May 20, 2019. The class smoked the salmon the week before. (Photo by Zoe Grueskin/KTOO)For kids who’ve never cooked, smoking their own salmon might seem out of reach. But a teacher at Juneau’s Floyd Dryden Middle School wants his students to know it’s just another life skill they can master — and shows them how to do it.Audio Playerhttps://media.ktoo.org/2019/05/23Smoked.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.It’s the last week of school before summer break, and things are pretty laid back at FDMS — at least in room 204, where the students are enjoying snacks and a nature documentary. It’s pretty standard end-of-year stuff, but that smoked salmon wasn’t bought at the store. The students smoked it themselves right outside their classroom just a few days before, with the help of their teacher, Chris Heidemann.Heidemann teaches hunter education and outdoor life skills classes, which he says mostly focus on preparing food. The smokehouse they use is easily built. Often he’ll have the students construct it, using plans he found online. He says the whole thing comes together in about three hours with $200 worth of materials.Inside, his classroom is full of more gadgets.“I have six functioning kitchens, set up with stoves, KitchenAids, microwaves, food processors, everything you’d need. Sinks for doing dishes,” says Heidemann.Heidemann’s goal is to demystify cooking for his students. Over the years he’s taught the class, he says, he’s learned to start with the basics. Even boiling water on the stove can be intimidating for a first-time cook. So Heidemann says that’s where they start.His class cooks pretty much every week. Over the course of the semester, they work up to more complicated recipes and projects, like the fish smoking.Most families contribute a $25 class fee, but Heidemann says that’s just a request, and no one is turned away if they can’t pay. Some projects are funded by specific grants that the Juneau School District helps him find.Fish smoking is one of them. That project’s been supported by a state program called Nutritional Alaskan Foods in Schools, which aims to bring more local foods to students.Heidemann has plenty of dreams for the class. He’d love to do more foraging and work with local game meat, like deer.“Just being able to be even more local with the foods that we use,” he said. “Maybe even growing something, but that could be years in the future with how things are developing right now.”The state grant that supports Heidemann’s fish smoking was last funded in 2015. That’s been enough to keep his classes smoking salmon since then. The district estimates that money will run out after next school year.Chris Heidemann checks on the final batch of salmon on May 17, 2019. He came to school at 4:30 that morning to light the fire in the smokehouse. (Photo by Zoe Grueskin/KTOO)Chris Heidemann says this smokehouse, pictured here on May 17, 2019, took around three hours and $200 worth of materials to build. (Photo by Zoe Grueskin/KTOO)Students enjoyed the salmon they smoked on one of the last days of class, May 20, 2019. (Photo by Zoe Grueskin/KTOO)123 read more

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New research could make safer polio vaccine, critical for eradication, a reality

first_img Senior Writer, Infectious Disease Helen covers issues broadly related to infectious diseases, including outbreaks, preparedness, research, and vaccine development. Related: In the LabNew research could make safer polio vaccine, critical for eradication, a reality WHO advisers say first malaria vaccine needs more real-world study @HelenBranswell Helen Branswell Polio has been brought to the brink of extinction by two vaccines designed in the 1950s by American scientific giants Jonas Salk and Albert Sabin. The polio eradication campaign, which began in 1988, has succeeded in halting spread of polioviruses in all but two countries, Pakistan and Afghanistan.The vaccines have prevented millions of people the world over from being paralyzed by polioviruses. But for all their history-changing benefits, both vaccines come with significant drawbacks. And even if polio transmissions can be stopped by sometime in 2016, as many hope, the world will continue to need a safe vaccine, potentially for decades to come.advertisement Workers in Buckinghamshire prepare a vaccine based on killed poliovirus in 1956. Fox Photos/Getty Images A polio milestone: One strain left in the crosshairs Related: British scientists say they have developed new viruses to serve as the basis for a safer polio vaccine, a much-needed tool as the world nears the eradication of the disease.While more research is needed to see if the vaccine strains are safe and effective in people, those involved in the polio eradication effort cheered the report, published Thursday in the journal PLOS Pathogens.“I’m impressed. I didn’t expect this to happen, certainly this quickly,” said Dr. Neal Halsey, director of the Institute for Vaccine Safety at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. Halsey was not involved in the research, but serves on a World Health Organization polio research committee with the senior author of the study.advertisement The vaccine viruses engineered by the British team, led by veteran polio researcher Philip Minor, will be safer than wild polioviruses, because like Sabin’s vaccine viruses, they are weakened. But unlike Sabin’s versions, the new vaccine viruses can be used in killed form, so there is no concern they will paralyze the immediate recipient. Nor can killed viruses spread from child to child, regaining virulence.“This is a very important step in terms of trying to have viruses that can be used to produce vaccine without any risk of those viruses causing outbreaks of polio,” Halsey said. He and others noted, though, that more work needs to be done to prove that the new vaccine viruses will deliver on their promise when used by people.And it remains to be seen if the vaccine viruses will actually ever be produced, experts acknowledged.Polio eradication program leaders hope that 2016 will be the year when polio transmission finally stops. Cessation of transmission would be followed by a three-year certification period, in which heightened surveillance would tell the world whether polio was truly gone. If no additional cases were seen, polio could be declared eradicated in 2019.The Global Polio Eradication Initiative’s strategic plan says countries should continue to use the polio vaccine — and it will have to be the killed virus vaccine — for at least five years after eradication is completed. Developed countries are unlikely to stop vaccinating for years, maybe decades. But some countries with limited health budgets and multiple health problems will want to stop vaccinating when it’s considered safe, Dowdle said.So will manufacturers take on the substantial expense of testing and licensing a wholly new polio vaccine for a market that is bound to start shrinking? Even if all goes well with these vaccine viruses, it could be a decade before a vaccine containing them is ready for use.This is a critical issue, admitted Dr. Walter Orenstein, associate director of the Emory Vaccine Center at Atlanta’s Emory University and a consultant on polio for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.“If this is going to be a viable tool, there needs to be a commercial incentive for use,” he said. “Would a five-year use be adequate commercial incentive to go through all of the development phases?” There has been a concerted effort to find a better, safer vaccine, but that goal has been elusive.Scientists at Britain’s National Institute for Biological Standards and Control, however, reported they have engineered polioviruses that could be used in a next-generation vaccine that would solve the problems of Sabin’s oral polio drops and the risks associated with production of Salk’s injectable vaccine, known in the polio world as OPV and IPV, respectively.The British team, funded by Britain’s Department of Health, reported it has managed to modify Sabin’s vaccine viruses so that they could be used in an inactivated vaccine, one in which the virus has been essentially killed. In animal testing, the new vaccine viruses appeared to generate a protective immune response. By Helen Branswell Dec. 31, 2015 Reprints About the Author Reprints Related: “It’s really a step in the right direction. They’ve done a nice job,” said Walter Dowdle, a former deputy director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and a member of a working group that advises the WHO on polio vaccine issues.It has long been understood that neither of the existing vaccines is an ideal option for use when polio transmission has stopped.Sabin’s oral vaccine, made with weakened polio strains, will on rare occasions paralyze a child who takes the vaccine drops. The WHO estimates that for every group of a million children getting multiple doses of oral vaccine, between two and four will develop polio paralysis from it.The oral vaccine poses another, more serious problem. Vaccinated children discharge the live, weakened vaccine viruses in their stool. Those vaccine viruses get into the environment, finding their way into other children. As they pass from one to the next, they can lose the mutations that weakened them, regaining the paralytic power of regular polioviruses.At this point, more children are actually being paralyzed by vaccine viruses than by wild polioviruses. The Global Polio Eradication Initiative says that in 2015, 70 children were paralyzed by polio but 213 were paralyzed by vaccine viruses that regained virulence.When polio cases numbered in the tens of thousands, the oral vaccine risks were outweighed by the vaccine’s considerable benefits. But it is clear polio will never fully vanish as long as oral polio vaccines are in use, and those vaccines will be phased out when transmission stops.At the individual level, the injectable vaccine created by Salk is safer, though its higher cost and the need to have it delivered by a health provider have for the most part put it out of reach of many developing countries. (Oral polio drops can be given by anyone with a moderate amount of training.)But production of the injectable vaccine poses its own risks, which will become even greater once polio transmission ceases. To make the vaccine, manufacturers must generate large volumes of polioviruses — and these are not the weakened versions — which are eventually killed and formulated into vaccine.If a production plant had an accidental leak, the results could be disastrous — especially if it were to happen in a country where polio vaccination efforts had lagged and large numbers of children were not protected against polio. That’s not just a theoretical threat; a GSK production facility in Rixensart, Belgium, accidentally released 11 gallons of solution containing live polioviruses into nearby waterways in 2013.It is also feared these supplies of virulent polioviruses could be targets for would-be bioterrorists. 3 stories to watch in global health in 2016 Tags global healthpolioVaccineslast_img read more

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Principal of local school outlines frustration at delay for new school

first_img Facebook Five Laois monuments to receive almost €200,000 in government funding Home News Community Principal of local school outlines frustration at delay for new school NewsCommunity Community Council Pinterest By David Power – 18th April 2018 Principal of local school outlines frustration at delay for new school Facebook TAGSBrian BerginFiona O’Loughlin TDSt Paul’s Secondary School Monasterevin Previous articleLaois teen entrepreneur gearing up for Student Enterprise National FinalNext articleEmpty seat a poignant reminder of the late Jerry Lodge David PowerA journalist for over 20 years, David has worked for a number of regional titles both as journalist and editor. From Tullamore he also works as a content editor for Independent.ie. His heroes include Shane Lowry, Seamus Darby and Johnny Flaherty Twittercenter_img Charlie Flanagan on Electric Picnic: ‘I’d ask organisers to consult with community leaders’ Labour TD Jack Wall, vice-principal of St Paul’s Monasterevin Mary Mullally, Minister for Education Ruairi Quinn and principal Brian Bergin in Monasterevin in 2013 Frustration at the delay in starting construction on a new St Paul’s School in Monasterevin was outlined by principal of the school before the Joint Committee on Education and Skills in the Dail this week.A new secondary school is scheduled for a site at Moore Abbey on the Athy Road out of Monasterevin by March 2021.The school was placed on the Government Capital Building Programme in 2011 and while the site was secured from the Muiriosa Foundation which govern Moore Abbey and the funding is in place, it has run into planning difficulties with issues involving Kildare County Council, the Department of Education and the National Roads Authority, who are involved also. Traditionally, a number of Laois students attended secondary school in the Kildare town – but the uncertainty over the new school build has led to students in the vicinity go to the likes of Athy, Kildare Town, Newbridge, Rathangan and Portarlington.In the meantime, students and staff continue to use a school dilapidated and well past its sell-by-date.The lapse in time between the announcement of the construction of new schools and the time at which their construction is completed was on the agenda of the Committee on Education and Skills.St Paul’s Principal, Brian Bergin – who lives in Abbeyleix – described the delays in the building process as frustrating to date.Mr Bergin said the latest department estimate put the anticipated opening date for a new building at St Paul’s at March 2021.“How can we reasonably expect this completion date to materialise after the last 13 years?” he said.“The past 13 years have been filled with excitement, expectation, hope, frustration and, latterly, anger and despair.”The impact on staff was “like being on a roller coaster”, he said, due to the delays.He outlined that staff has increased in the school from 25 to 44 since 2005, while student intake has increased by 100 per cent and space to work is now ‘a difficulty’.“I feel like the project manager – we don’t have a dedicated project manager at the Department of Education – I feel like one but I am powerless. I have been told to be thankful (by the Department of Education) you are on a list – how many lists do we need to be on? I am getting emotional now – it has been hell. Managing expectations of this has been difficult. We feel neglected and that’s really sad,” Mr Bergin said.Committee Chair Fiona O’Loughlin, TD said that the situation in St Paul’s is like teaching in a third world country.She said equity and fairness is needed on the issue, and a school to be delivered within a certain period of time.She added that recommendations will be made to the Minister for Education.Also appearing before the Committee were officials from Department of Education and Skills and Representatives from Ballinteer Educate Together National School; Whitecross National School, Julianstown.A social media post by the St Paul’s Secondary School New Build Facebook page commented: “Brian Bergin’s ongoing commitment to St. Paul’s goes above and beyond, he has to wear many hats, and as he said he has been like a project manager for our new school as well as running a very busy secondary school in the dire building conditions the school is subject to. “He gave a very powerful and moving address to the committee and expressed the ongoing frustration from the staff, pupils, parents and community are facing, while all the time continuing the excellent teaching that we are so lucky our children are receiving.“We are very proud of our school principal, staff and pupils and we won’t stop until we have our new school. Huge thanks to Brian for his unrelenting hard work and thanks to Fiona O’Loughlin for affording us this forum today, onwards and upwards,” it read.SEE ALSO – Empty seat a poignant reminder of the late Jerry Lodge New Arles road opens but disquiet over who was invited to official opening Pinterest WhatsApp Community WhatsApp Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

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Camross survive Castletown test to book semi-final place

first_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter GAA Home Hurling Club Hurling Camross survive Castletown test to book semi-final place HurlingClub HurlingSportGAALaois SHC Previous articleLIVE BLOG: Follow all of the action as Camross and Castletown clash in Laois SHC quarter-finalNext articleThe rise and rise of Portlaoise camogie highlighted with first ever appearance in adult county final Steven Millerhttp://www.laoistoday.ieSteven Miller is owner and managing editor of LaoisToday.ie. From Laois, Steven studied Journalism in DCU and has 14 years experience in the media, almost 10 of those in an editorial role. Husband of Emily, father of William and Lillian, he’s happiest when he’s telling stories or kicking a point. TAGSCamrossCamross v CastletownCastletownLaois SHC Camross 0-24 Castletown 2-13Laois Shopping Centre SHC Quarter-finalCamross’s hopes of winning a third Laois SHC title in a row remain on track after surviving a stern challenge from their neighbours Castletown in the quarter-final in O’Moore Park this evening.They recovered from a six-point deficit early in the second half to completely dominate from there to the final whistle.They limited Castletown to just three points in the second half and outscored them 0-13 to 0-3.For the most part, it was right good contest.After three rounds of shadow boxing and going through the motions, this was real championship hurling.Camross, facing into a huge weekend for the club and going for an historic three senior titles in a row, raced into an early 0-4 to no score lead thanks to two points from Eoin Gaughan and one each from Ciaran Collier and Craig Carroll.But Castletown quickly settled and found their groove. Ryan Mullaney pointed a long-range free, then Dylan Conroy got two frees in a row before adding one from play to have the sides level after ten minutes.Indeed Castletown hit seven on the trot with John Gaughan and Mullaney adding monstrous efforts from play and Conor Phelan adding another.Camross hit four of the next five to be back level at 0-8 each – Dean Delaney, Holmes, Carroll and Lorcan Burke – with a super effort from Gearoid Gaughan in response for Castletown.The next score was the game’s first goal – Martin Phelan doing brilliantly along the endline to fire past Thomas Dunphy from a tight angle after 15 minutes.Tomas Burke instantly replied with a point from play but Castletown soon struck for the game’s second goal. This time Martin Phelan responded quickest when a Ryan Mullaney free came back off the post and he broke free from the Camross defence to get enough power on his shot to beat Dunphy again, despite a touch from the keeper.Dylan Conroy and Ryan Mullaney traded frees with Niall Holmes and Gearoid Burke but Castletown were fully deserving of their 2-10 to 0-11 lead at the break.Camross eat into the lead in the second half, even if their shooting was horribly erratic at times.Tomas Burke got two from play, Eoin Gaughan, Gearoid Burke and Andrew Collier got one each and Niall Holmes added a handful of frees. By the 50th minute the sides were level, Castletown managing only three points in the second half.It was all Camross in that final quarter. Craig Carroll, who had a fine game, put them into the lead for the first time since the early stages of the first half and Holmes, Gaughan, Ciaran Collier and sub Darren Gilmartin all added points.In all they hit the last eight points of the game.Rathdowney-Errill or Clough-Ballacolla await in the semi-finals.But for now the three-in-a-row lives on.SCORERS – Camross: Niall Holmes 0-6 (frees), Eoin Gaughan 0-4, Craig Carroll 0-3, Tomas Burke 0-3, Lorcan Burke 0-2, Ciaran Collier 0-2, Gearoid Burke 0-1 (free), Dean Delaney 0-1, Andrew Collier 0-1 Darren Gilmartin 0-1 Castletown: Martin Phelan 2-1, Dylan Conroy 0-6 (four frees), Ryan Mullaney 0-3 (two frees), Gearoid Gaughan 0-1, Conor Phelan 0-1, John Gaughan 0-1CAMROSS: Thomas Dunphy; Dwane Palmer, Joe Phelan, Andrew Mortimer; Darrell Dooley, Gearoid Burke, Lorcan Burke; Andrew Collier, Craig Carroll; Eoin Gaughan, Tomas Burke, Dean Delaney; Niall Holmes, Ciaran Collier, Mark Dowling. Subs: Darren Gilmartin for Delaney (44), Darren Gilmartin for T Burke (50)CASTLETOWN: JP Bennett, Evan Cuddy, Fionan Cuddy, Martin Reddin; Shane Phelan, Ryan Mullaney, John Gaughan; Conor Phelan, Brendan Reddin; Gearoid Gaughan, Joe McCormack, Dylan Conroy; Aaron Gaughan, Martin Phelan, Shane Cuddy. Subs: Conor Walsh for G Gaughan (48)REFEREE: Anthony Stapleton (Rathdowney-Errill)SEE ALSO – Check out all our Laois SHC coverage here Pinterest Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory Facebook Twitter By Steven Miller – 20th September 2019 Facebook WhatsApp GAA Camross survive Castletown test to book semi-final place WhatsApp GAA Pinterest 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshinlast_img read more

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First Asset launches three barbell bond ETFs

Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Toronto-based First Asset Capital Corp. is launching three new bond exchange traded funds that will begin trading on the Toronto Stock Exchange on Tuesday, July 10. The company says each First Asset DEX ETF is unique in the Canadian marketplace and has been designed to replicate, to the extent possible, the performance of a particular PC-Bond DEX Bond Barbell Index on a low cost basis. Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Companies First Asset A barbell bond investment strategy is implemented, as the name implies — with 50% weighting in short-term bonds and floating rate notes and a 50% weighting in long-term bonds, with nothing in the middle. Barry Gordon, president and CEO of First Asset ETFs advises investment advisors and investors to consider a barbell ETF as part of a prudent, risk mitigation strategy. “The First Asset Barbell Bond ETFs and the DEX Indexes which they replicate allocate investment grade fixed income securities in a balanced way, combining 50% short-term and floating rate bonds with 50% in higher yielding longer-term bonds — an ideal combination to maintain a strong yield while mitigating inflation and interest rate risk and protecting the value of your portfolio, on a low cost basis,” he explains. First Asset DEX Government Bond Barbell Index ETF (TSX:GXF) has been designed to replicate, to the extent possible, the performance of the DEX Government Bond Barbell Index, net of expenses. The index is comprised of Canadian federal government, provincial government and municipal government bonds. The Index is divided into two buckets, with the short maturity bucket comprised of floating rate notes and fixed coupon bonds with at least 1 year to maturity but less than 2 years to maturity, and the long maturity bucket comprised of fixed coupon bonds with at least 10 years to maturity but less than 20 years to maturity. This ETF features a management fee of 0.20%. First Asset DEX Corporate Bond Barbell Index ETF (TSX:KXF) has been designed to replicate, to the extent possible, the performance of the DEX Corporate Bond Barbell Index, net of expenses. The index is comprised of investment grade fixed income securities issued by Canadian corporations, as well as special purpose companies utilized and fully and unconditionally guaranteed by Canadian corporations that are federally regulated entities by the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI). The index is divided into two buckets, with the short maturity bucket comprised of floating rate notes and fixed coupon bonds with at least one year to maturity but less than two years to maturity, and the long maturity bucket comprised of fixed rate bonds with at least 10 years to maturity but less than 20 years to maturity. This ETF has a management fee off 0.25%. First Asset DEX All Canada Bond Barbell Index ETF (TSX:AXF) has been designed to replicate, to the extent possible, the performance of the DEX All Canada Bond Barbell Index, net of expenses. The index is comprised of Canadian federal government, provincial government and municipal government bonds, and investment grade fixed income securities issued by Canadian corporations and special purpose companies utilized and fully and unconditionally guaranteed by Canadian corporations that are federally regulated entities by the OSFI. The index is divided into two buckets, with the short maturity bucket comprised of floating rate notes and fixed coupon bonds with at least 1 year to maturity but less than 2 years to maturity, and the long maturity bucket comprised of bonds with at least 10 years to maturity but less than 20 years to maturity. This ETF has a 0.25% management fee. The three ETFs are also avaiable in advisor class units. IE Staff read more

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NITV and Screen Australia announce children’s series Barrumbi Kids

first_imgNITV and Screen Australia announce children’s series Barrumbi Kids National Indigenous Television (NITV) has announced the commissioning of Barrumbi Kids, with major production investment from Screen Australia.Barrumbi Kids tells the story of best friends Tomias and Dahlia – two best friends growing up in a remote Northern Territory community. Through fishing, hunting and schooling, the children learn about themselves, each other and living in both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal cultures.The series, produced by Danielle MacLean (Mystery Road, Grace Beside Me, Little J & Big Cuz, Redfern Now) of Tamarind Tree Pictures and Monica O’Brien (Drop Dead Weird, For REAL) of Ambience Entertainment and Julia Morris (Finding Maawirrangga, Kundirri The Life) is based on the popular book series by Territory author Leonie Norrington.The 10 by 30-minute children’s television series will be filmed in Beswick (Wugularr), Northern Territory, and is expected to air on NITV in 2022.Barrumbi Kids is a Tamarind Tree Pictures and Ambience Entertainment production for NITV. Major production investment from Screen Australia in association with Screen Territory. Financed with support from the Australian Children’s Television Foundation (ACTF) who will manage international sales.Esther Bullumbarra, Beswick (Wugularr) T.O. Jawoyn Country said, “It is really good having Barrumbi Kids in our community of Beswick. I’m really excited to see our kids making this series, changing it from a book into a television series. The books were published a long time ago now and we will be the first community to make a television series here. People, especially the kids, will be able to see our culture.”Danielle MacLean, Monica O’Brien and Julia Morris, co-producers of Barrumbi Kids, said, “Barrumbi Kids is one of those projects that you fight to get made because it’s so good, so important and such an incredible experience for all involved. After years of collaborative development with the Beswick Community. We’re so thrilled to have the support of NITV, Screen Australia, ACTF and Screen Territory to create this incredible series for Australian children to be inspired by.”Kyas Hepworth, NITV’s Head of Commissioning and Programming said, “NITV is committed to producing and showcasing quality content that is relevant to young Indigenous audiences. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids should see themselves reflected on screen – as well as the celebration of Indigenous culture and language. Through Barrumbi Kids, we’re able to do just that, all while sharing the beauty of Wugularr with Australia. We can’t wait to showcase Jawoyn Country and to bring this Children’s series to screens for all children across Australia to enjoy.”Sally Caplan, Screen Australia’s Head of Content said, “We’re proud to support this quality children’s series from a talented creative team including director Grant Brown and emerging Indigenous directors Deb Brown and Ismail Khan. It’s special for a television series to not only reflect back to children and their families living in remote communities their own stories, but also share their unique cultural experiences on screens around the country and the world. I am looking forward to seeing Barrumbi Kids bring the beautiful remote Northern Territory to our screens.”Jenny Buckland, CEO of the Australian Children’s Television Foundation (ACTF) said, “The ACTF’s investment in Barrumbi Kids is the first major investment made possible by the additional funding we’ve received from the Commonwealth to invest in children’s content over the next two years. We’re excited to support NITV’s aspirations to deliver ambitious projects for its children’s audience and to be bringing this content to the world. It’s another authentic series set in the Northern Territory, and today’s announcement is a huge testament to how hard Danielle Maclean, Monica O’Brien, Julia Morris and the Beswick Community have worked to get to this point.”Jennie Hughes, Director of Screen Territory, said, “This is an amazing outcome and it’s wonderful to see the intended results of Screen Territory’s Business Enterprise funding coming to fruition for Tamarind Tree Pictures as they produce this high-end children’s series in partnership with family entertainment specialist Ambience Entertainment. This will be the first major NT children’s series to be produced in the Top End and within the Indigenous community of Beswick. It is a project of ambition and scale, which will employ Territorians and bring economic benefit and opportunities to not only the Big Rivers region but also to the wider Top End.“Barrumbi Kids is a uniquely Territorian project, and we are delighted that we will be working once again with major investor Screen Australia and the Australian Children’s Television Foundation in bringing the much-loved Territorian book series by author Leonie Norrington to the screen. Screen Territory is proud to have a long association with SBS and NITV and so moving into high-end scripted Indigenous children’s content marks an exciting new step in our creative partnership, and I can’t think of a more apt project to announce during Reconciliation Week.”Barrumbi Kids premieres on NITV in 2022. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Aboriginal, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, Australia, Australian, commonwealth, community, Entertainment, Government, Indigenous, Investment, Maclean, Northern Territory, production, Redfern, remote communities, SBS, Screen Australialast_img read more

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VIDEO: A drive-by birthday party for a man of joy

first_imgVIDEO: A drive-by birthday party for a man of joyPosted by Jacob GrannemanDate: Monday, August 3, 2020in: Peopleshare 0 Vancouver man and his family celebrate with parade of buses, cop cars and friends VANCOUVER — Aaron Robinson loves everyone. He lives with his mom Vickie and his dad Rod in Vancouver. He just celebrated his 40th birthday. Even though Aaron lives every day with Down Syndrome, he has never once let it dampen his zeal for loving others. That love was reciprocated this past weekend, as his family, friends and community came out in a COVID-era appropriate drive-by birthday party, just for him. Aaron Robinson (middle) poses for a photo here with Clark County Sheriff’s deputies during his surprise drive-by birthday. Photo courtesy of Rod RobinsonAaron Robinson (middle) poses for a photo here with Clark County Sheriff’s deputies during his surprise drive-by birthday. Photo courtesy of Rod RobinsonWith the help of Kindness 911, the Clark County Sheriff’s Office, the Marine Corps Bikers, and CVAN, Aaron was treated to a magnificent display of what he believes are some of the coolest people ever. “We had more than we thought we would have, but we just put the word out to do a drive-by and got so many involved that we kinda let everyone run with it,” Rod said. “Plus he loves cops, firemen, bus drivers, etc, etc, etc.”Aaron wanted to say thank you to everyone who came to his birthday party, thank you to all the officers and drivers who stopped by and God bless America.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Clark CountyLatestVancouvershare 0 Previous : Section of Burnt Bridge Creek Trail to close for repaving Sat., Aug. 8 Next : Woodland Public Schools superintendent to recommend start of new school year with full distance-learningAdvertisementThis is placeholder textlast_img read more

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Vancouver L driver doubles speed limit with parent in the vehicle

first_img First Look: 2022 Lexus NX The sport-cute’s looks have been softened, but its powertrains and infotainment offerings have been sharpened Trending in Canada We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles using Facebook commenting Visit our FAQ page for more information. ‹ Previous Next › COMMENTSSHARE YOUR THOUGHTS Trending Videos Once the transmission is finished with it, the power is sent to all four wheels via an all-wheel-drive system with torque vectoring. The rear wheels also have a few party tricks, such as independent steering and Bentley’s first electronic limited-slip-differential.RELATED See More Videos PlayThe Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car everPlay3 common new car problems (and how to prevent them) | Maintenance Advice | Driving.caPlayFinal 5 Minivan Contenders | Driving.caPlay2021 Volvo XC90 Recharge | Ministry of Interior Affairs | Driving.caPlayThe 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning is a new take on Canada’s fave truck | Driving.caPlayBuying a used Toyota Tundra? Check these 5 things first | Used Truck Advice | Driving.caPlayCanada’s most efficient trucks in 2021 | Driving.caPlay3 ways to make night driving safer and more comfortable | Advice | Driving.caPlayDriving into the Future: Sustainability and Innovation in tomorrow’s cars | Driving.ca virtual panelPlayThese spy shots get us an early glimpse of some future models | Driving.ca center_img The Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car ever First Look: 2021 Bentley Bentayga Bentley’s latest rocket couch is here: The Continental GT Speed adds a lot of performance without compromising any comfort or luxury.Building on the Continental GT, the new Speed is Bentley’s most performance-oriented vehicle in the brand’s history.Under the hood is the brand’s venerable 6.0-litre W12 engine, pushing out 650 horsepower and 664 lb-ft of torque. It’s how the power gets to the ground where the new GT Speed differs itself from the rest, however: the power is first sent through an eight-speed dual-clutch gearbox, which shifts twice as fast in sport mode as the regular GT. RELATED TAGSBentleyContinentalLuxuryLuxury VehiclesNew VehiclesLuxury advertisement Deliveries begin in the third quarter of 2021. Bentley just assembled its last-ever Mulsanne flagship sedan0-100 km/h happens in just 3.6 seconds, which is a 0.1-second improvement over the standard model, and the top speed is an incredible 335 km/h (208 mph).On the inside of the vehicle is the typical smattering of carbon fibre and Alacantara, but any sensible person should choose the leather and wood option, or perhaps the gorgeous engine-turned centre console. last_img read more

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Jamaica presents Human Rights Report to UN Council

first_imgRelatedJamaica presents Human Rights Report to UN Council Jamaica presents Human Rights Report to UN Council Foreign AffairsNovember 14, 2010 FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Senator The Honourable Marlene Malahoo Forte, Minister of State in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade, has reiterated the commitment of the Government of Jamaica to the promotion and protection of the human rights of all its citizens and to the fundamental principles of democracy and the rule of law.The Minister was presenting Jamaica’s human rights report to the 9th Session of the Working Group of the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva, Switzerland, on Monday, 8 November 2010. This is in keeping with the Council’s mandate to assess the human right situation in all 192 UN Member States under the Mechanism of the Universal Periodic Review (UPR).The report highlighted Jamaica’s achievements as well as the challenges and constraints facing the country in its efforts to promote and protect human rights across a broad spectrum, including crime prevention and security strategies, justice reform initiatives, health and education, as well as women’s and children’s rights.In the interactive dialogue, the Minister addressed concerns raised relating to the retention of the death penalty, allegations pertaining to extrajudicial killings and the issue of sexual orientation.Members of the Working Group commended Jamaica for the candid and transparent manner in which issues were addressed. While noting the progress made in protecting the human rights of its citizens, members of the Working Group recommended that Jamaica consider the adoption of specific legislative and institutional measures to enhance the framework for human rights protection at the national level.Given the challenges Jamaica faces as a highly indebted Small Island Developing State with a vulnerable economy, Minister Malahoo Forte made a special appeal to the international community for technical assistance with a view to helping the Government to continue to strengthen and improve its capacity to discharge its responsibility to its people, in promoting and protecting their human rights,.Following the adoption by the Working Group on Wednesday (10 November 2010) Jamaica’s Report will be formally submitted to by the Human Rights Council in March 2011 in Geneva, at which time the Government of Jamaica will provide further responses to the recommendations made by Member States during the meeting of the Working Group.The Minister was accompanied by senior officials from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade, Attorney General’s Chambers and the Ministry of National Security as well as the Ambassador/Permanent Representative and staff from the Jamaican Mission in Geneva. RelatedJamaica presents Human Rights Report to UN Councilcenter_img RelatedJamaica presents Human Rights Report to UN Council Advertisementslast_img read more

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