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Slideshow: Fourth of July 2016 in Juneau

first_imgArts & Culture | Community | JuneauSlideshow: Fourth of July 2016 in JuneauJuly 4, 2016 by Rashah McChesney Share:Paul Desloover tapes a flag onto a float for Juneau’s Veteran’s For Peace group before Juneau’s Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)The City of Juneau’s Pipe Band practices with an audience before Juneau’s Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)A group representing Alaska Airlines dances before walking in Juneau’s Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)Members of the Southeast Alaska LGBTQ+Alliance dance at their float before Juneau’s Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)Costumed Shoefly representatives wave and throw candy to the crowds for an Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)Leroy Romero, of Juneau, waits to drive a trolley with members of the Fusion Dance Company for Juneau’s Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)Rylee Caron helps Lisa Marx lace up her sleeves as the two prepare to walk with the Society for Creative Anachronism group in Juneau’s Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)Costumed Shoefly representatives wave and throw candy to the crowds for an Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)Hundreds turned out for an Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)Members of the Juneau Rollergirls demonstrate during an Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. The photographer was skating with the team. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)Members of the Juneau Rollergirls demonstrate during an Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. The photographer was skating with the team. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)Hundreds turned out for an Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)Members of Filipino Community, Inc. dance during Juneau’s Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)A woman tosses candy during Juneau’s Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)Hundreds turned out for an Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)Members of Filipino Community, Inc. dance during Juneau’s Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)Members of Filipino Community, Inc. dance during Juneau’s Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)Candy is prepared at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 5559 float before Juneau’s Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)A Sarah Palin imitator poses for a photo before walking with the Southeast Alaska LGBTQ+Alliance in Juneau’s Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)Cody Galletes, 16, considers firing 16-year-old Savannah Meketa’s bow as they wait to represent Juneau Douglas High School’s football and cheerleading programs before an Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)Crowds prepare for Juneau’s Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)Baskets of candy awaiting distribution during Juneau’s Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)Maggie Polizzotto, recovers from a sugar high in a motorcycle sidecar before riding with the Shriners during Juneau’s Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)Kara Longstreth of Eugene, Oregon checks her lipstick before representing the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers in Juneau’s Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)A tube man hovers over a float over the Juneau Family & Urgent Care float as it heads along the parade route. More than 49 organizations and hundreds of people turned out to march in Juneau’s Independence Day parade on July 4, 2016, in Juneau. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)12345678910111213141516171819202122232425 read more

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Obama administration wants $1 billion to jumpstart Joe Biden’s cancer ‘moonshot’

first_img Related: Related: Vice President Joe Biden’s cancer effort will get a big boost from President Barack Obama’s final budget, which comes out next week. Jacquelyn Martin/AP As part of this funding “jumpstart,” Obama will also request a new funding stream, called the Exceptional Opportunities in Cancer Research Fund, which will direct money to “out-of-the-box” research that previously struggled to receive federal grants. The administration officials declined to be more specific about what kind of research would be the target of that funding, saying more information would be available soon.The National Cancer Moonshot, as the White House has begun to call it, will focus on six areas, according to administration officials: early-detection technology, cancer vaccines, immunotherapy, genomic analysis of tumors, enhanced data sharing, and pediatric cancer.The funding announcement comes the same day that Biden will convene a meeting of his new federal cancer task force created. Obama will be at the meeting, and top officials from the Department of Health and Human Services, Defense Department, VA, NIH, and FDA are expected to be in attendance.Along with its research and data goals, the task force will focus on trying to expand access to clinical trials, which only 5 percent of cancer patients currently participate in, one official said. The medical education of Joe Biden: a serious listening tour with vague goals “We believe that starting the moonshot now will allow us to capitalize on recent great strides in the cancer research area,” one official said.For the current fiscal year, the National Cancer Institute has a $5.2 billion budget, while NIH as a whole has a $32 billion budget. Both saw significant increases in the spending bill signed by Obama in December.Congress must approve the president’s funding request before the money could actually be spent. White House press secretary Josh Earnest said Obama will make his pitch for the funding at a meeting Tuesday with House Speaker Paul Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. There will also be increased spending on cancer programs at the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs, which will boost longitudinal research into risks factors for cancer and new treatments.The overall goal being set by the administration, officials said, is to achieve a decade’s worth of advances in five years. The officials declined to be specific about how that progress would be measured, saying more information would be given in the coming weeks.advertisement WASHINGTON — The Obama administration is aiming to spend $1 billion to jumpstart the cancer moonshot being led by Vice President Joe Biden, senior administration officials said Monday.Some of that money has already been appropriated in the federal spending bill that President Barack Obama signed in December, the officials told reporters on a conference call. Nearly $200 million in new funding from the omnibus bill, directed to the National Institutes of Health, will be spent on new cancer initiatives, they said.In his final budget proposal, to be released Feb. 9, Obama will then request another $755 million for the next fiscal year to pursue a multi-year moonshot initiative, officials said. The vast majority would go toward the NIH, while $75 million would be earmarked for data work at the Food and Drug Administration.advertisement Biden has said that the cancer task force would allow him to use “every federal agency at my disposal” in the moonshot. He has pledged to figure out ways to make the federal government “partners, not impediments” in progressing toward breakthrough treatments.The task force’s first meeting, which is closed to the public, will be held in the vice president’s office. Leading up to that launch, Biden has met with upwards of 200 cancer researchers and advocates since October, according to his aides.Biden urged a “national commitment to end cancer” when he announced in the fall that he would not run for president. Obama endorsed the moonshot in his State of the Union address last month and placed Biden in charge of it.Sheila Kaplan contributed to this report.This story has been updated with comments from White House press secretary Josh Earnest. A presidential cancer moonshot (again)Volume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/2016/02/01/biden-cancer-moonshot-budget/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0001:1001:10  Presidents have been promising to cure cancer for 45 years, but cancer is still very much with us. Alex Hogan/STAT Joe Biden urges ‘more tax dollars, a lot more cooperation’ for cancer moonshot By Dylan Scott Feb. 1, 2016 Reprints PoliticsObama administration wants $1 billion to jumpstart Joe Biden’s cancer ‘moonshot’ State of the Union 2016: Obama endorses Biden’s cancer research ‘moonshot’ Related: Tags cancerJoe Bidenmoonshotpolicylast_img read more

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In Pictures: History of the O’Moore clan remembered at launch of the Fort Protector

first_imgHome News Community In Pictures: History of the O’Moore clan remembered at launch of the… NewsCommunity GAA Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results Pinterest 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshin WhatsApp Twitter Pinterest GAA SEE ALSO – WATCH: The Laois-Offaly rivalry heats up as battle of the videos emerge Facebook TAGSThe Old Fort Quarter Festival GAA Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory In Pictures: History of the O’Moore clan remembered at launch of the Fort Protector Previous articleOur guide to what’s on the first weekend in JulyNext articleSt Joseph’s upset the odds against league final searching Portlaoise Siun Lennonhttp://heresosiun.blogspot.ie/2016/09/the-lekkie-piccie-experience.htmlSiún Lennon joined LaoisToday in a full-time capacity after studying Journalism and New Media in the University of Limerick. She hails from Rosenallis and her interests vary from news, sports and politics. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Twitter By Siun Lennon – 4th July 2019 Facebook “With the wonderful conservation of the Old Fort Walls, the performance space and the wildlife-friendly planting, the new Fitzmaurice Place makes a great contribution to the culture and heritage of the town.“But this is just part of what is planned for the centre of Portlaoise It’s one piece of the jigsaw of what’s needed for the heritage-led regeneration of the town”.However there is an interesting and considerable history to the Old Fort in Portlaoise, which many people who pass by it’s walls may not realise.The Old Fort, located within the centre of Portlaoise, was built to keep out the O’Moore clan and septs of Laois, which the British settlers found to be ‘too warlike’ and unrelenting in 1547/48.Chairman of the Heritage Council of Ireland and former Portlaoise principal Michael Parsons spoke the origins of the Fort Protector.“Today we celebrate the vital story of Portlaoise, of Laois, and indeed of Ireland.“Fort Protector was the first plantation born in the English-speaking world. It played a central role in the the first plantation of Ireland, in Laois and Offaly.“The Fort was built to maintain the authority of the Pale in the middle of Ireland, and to supress the indepedent and warlike clans in the area, who were led by the O’Moores.“The Fort withstood various uprisings by the septs of Laois, led by the O’Moores and sometimes supported by the O’Connors of Offaly.”Mr Parsons went on to say that the O’Moores were finally ‘banished’ from Laois to Kerry in 1607, and the town of Portlaoise grew around the fort.“The Fort that was built here in 1547/48 was the forerunner of every British fortification and planted settlement in Ireland and through the later British empire.”President of Laois Heritage Society Teddy Fennelly also spoke at length about Laois’s colourful past.“The O’Moores and the O’Connors, and the other great clans, or septs as we call them, who ruled the land here, presented the biggest resistance to Tudor England’s ambitions of surpressing the Irish, and in pursuing their object in expanding control over the entire country,” said Mr Fennelly.Referring to the Old Fort walls, Mr Fennelly said: “The final conquest of Ireland started here – inside and outside of those walls. The British blueprint for colonisation started here.”“We are delighted to see the upgrade in this part of the town, especially in this historic part of Portlaoise.”For many years Fort Protector, the 16th century fort at the centre of the origin story of Portlaoise, lay at the back of the Main Street and at the centre of the old part of the town, forgotten by many, and in many ways “hidden in plain sight”.Laois Heritage Society had always known and valued the fort, and in 2015 with help from the Heritage Council and Laois County Council, they started work on a Conservation Plan for the Fort.The Fort Conservation Plan and the Vision Statement together laid the groundwork for a successful Historic Towns Initiative (HTI) application in 2018.The HTI project was underway when an application for Urban Regeneration Development Funding was successful in early 2019.This phase of work involved conservation of masonry of south wall and round baston of 16th century Fort Protector, removal of mass concrete remains of mill below Fitzmaurice Place and upgrading of the public realm (paving, lighting, seating, planting and layout) to architects’ specifications at Fitzmaurice Place.The project also included pollinator-friendly planting and landscaping with wildlife in mind, and the installation of a new performance space with lighting and power.Funding has been granted under Project Ireland 2040 (Urban Regeneration and Development Fund) for Phase II of this project, which involves conservation of the masonry of the Fort Wall on Tower Hill and Railway Street, and the extension of the public realm improvements around the remainder of the Fort Wall.Conservation of Old St Peter’s Church and graveyard on Railway Street are also included, as the heritage of the towns continues to play a major part in its regeneration.Photos of the official launch below were taken by Alf Harvey and Julie-Anne Miller.Teddy Fennelly, president of Laois Heritage; Angela McEvoy, senior planner LCC; Valerie McLoughlin, project engineer with Eireng Consulting Engineers at the formal opening of the Fort Protector/Fitzmaurice Place conservation project.Picture: Alf Harvey.Minister Charlie Flanagan with Councillors and officials at the formal opening of the Fort Protector/Fitzmaurice Place conservation project.Picture: Alf Harvey.Minister Charlie Flanagan with Councillors, officials and guests at the formal opening of the Fort Protector/Fitzmaurice Place conservation project.Picture: Alf Harvey.The project team at the formal opening of the Fort Protector/Fitzmaurice Place conservation project.Picture: Alf Harvey.Heritage people at the formal opening of the Fort Protector/Fitzmaurice Place conservation project.Picture: Alf Harvey.Minister Charlie Flanagan and Cathaoirleach Willie Aird perform the unveiling at the formal opening of the Fort Protector/Fitzmaurice Place conservation project.Picture: Alf Harvey.MIchael Parsons, chairman Heritage Council; Minister Charlie Flanagan and Jackie McCluskey at the formal opening of the Fort Protector/Fitzmaurice Place conservation project.Picture: Alf Harvey.The formal opening of the Fort Protector/Fitzmaurice Place conservation project.Picture: Alf Harvey.The formal opening of the Fort Protector/Fitzmaurice Place conservation project.Picture: Alf Harvey.Cathaoirleach Willie Aird MC speaking at the formal opening of the Fort Protector/Fitzmaurice Place conservation project.Picture: Alf Harvey.Some of the large attendance at the formal opening of the Fort Protector/Fitzmaurice Place conservation project.Picture: Alf Harvey. Last Friday June 28 marked the official launch of the Fort Protector Conservation Phase and Old Fort Festival at the newly revamped Fitzmaurice Place.The Old Fort Festival is a celebration of heritage, music, food and family entertainment based in and around the walls of the Old Fort Protector, Portlaoise.Speaking at the formal opening, Cathaoirleach of Laois County Council, Willie Aird said “This new public space for the people of Portlaoise will help bring life back to this part of town.last_img read more

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NSSC issues temporary CTO to stop potential scam

first_img The Nova Scotia Securities Commission (NSSC) issued a temporary cease trade order Monday against Stratus Financial Group International, Stratus Offshore, Magnus Torgenson, and John Westbrook — all of whom, it says, are not registered to sell securities in the province. The initial order expires after 15 days. While the regulator has not made formal allegations against the respondents, the temporary order indicates that it appears they have traded without registration in the province. The commission reports that it has received complaints from three investors saying that they were cold called by the companies’ representatives pressuring them to invest in natural gas futures and foreign exchange options. Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Man charged with violating OSC order Court orders probation for trading ban violation ASC sanctions violation of cease trade order Related newscenter_img Earlier this year, Stratus was permanently cease traded by regulators in New Brunswick after hearings before the Financial Consumer Services Tribunal, which found that they traded without registration, and also suggested they appeared to be a boiler room. Along with Stratus, which is based in San Jose, Costa Rica, it also cease traded Ken Powers, a self-identified representative of Stratus; along with London, UK-based, Sachs International S.A. (Sachs), and a senior adviser with Sachs, Charles King. “Investors who fall prey to the high-pressure, now-or-never script used by boiler room representatives are at significant risk of losing a lot of money.” said Heidi Schedler, enforcement counsel for the NSSC. “We’re concerned for the financial safety of Nova Scotians and want the public to know that they can always hang up the phone and take the time to make sure that whoever is contacting them is registered with a securities commission.” Share this article and your comments with peers on social media James Langton Keywords Cease trade ordersCompanies Nova Scotia Securities Commission last_img read more

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Dr. Tortello Urges Early Childhood Instructors to Adopt New Curriculum

first_imgRelatedDr. Tortello Urges Early Childhood Instructors to Adopt New Curriculum Advertisements Dr. Tortello Urges Early Childhood Instructors to Adopt New Curriculum EducationJune 3, 2009 RelatedDr. Tortello Urges Early Childhood Instructors to Adopt New Curriculumcenter_img RelatedDr. Tortello Urges Early Childhood Instructors to Adopt New Curriculum FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Special Advisor on Early Childhood Education and Parenting in the Ministry of Education, Dr. Rebecca Tortello, has called on Early Childhood instructors to adopt the concepts proposed in the newly revised curriculum.“We want our Early Childhood instructors to be able to become facilitators of the curriculum (and) to learn to facilitate teaching and learning, as opposed to standing up at a blackboard and encouraging rote learning,” she said.She was speaking at the launch of the inaugural Early Childhood Expo 2009, held today (June 3) at the Mona Visitors’ Lodge, University of the West Indies (UWI), Mona.Dr. Tortello said that the new curriculum, spearheaded by the Dudley Grant Memorial Trust, in collaboration with the Education Ministry through its Early Childhood Unit and the Early Childhood Commission (ECC), sought to implement a more interactive, child-centred, holistic style of teaching.Early Childhood Consultant, Joyce Jarrett, peruses a flyer advertising the Early Childhood Expo 2009, during the launch of the event today (June 3) at the Mona Visitors’ Lodge at the University of the West Indies (UWI) Mona. The expo will be held on June 7 at the Jamaica Pegasus Hotel.She said that even though the new curriculum focuses on important elements, such as health, safety and nutrition, the incorporation of play was the most revolutionary aspect of it.“Many scholars and psychologists have noted how important play is to the development of the child in every domain – affective, cognitive, social (and) emotional,” she explained.Dr. Tortello contended that children have not been fully exposed to experiencing different types of play – dramatic play, parallel play, outdoor play – largely because there are not many playgrounds.She said that the Ministry, through the ECC and the Dudley Grant Memorial Trust, were working to help Early Childhood institutions erect safe places for children to play, and to look at erecting some of these playgrounds around the island in easily accessible locations.She also noted that the Ministry has been focussing on emergent literacy, which deals with children entering primary school and being able to read.“Emergent literacy doesn’t mean that they can read when they enter primary school, necessarily, but it means that they are sensitised to recognise print (and) numbers in their environment; they know how to hold the book the proper way; they know how to answer questions about the story; they can think critically and creatively about what they’ve heard,” she said.Dr. Tortello added that it was important that students possess these skills when they enter Grade One, because studies have shown that, if they enter Grade One as non-readers, they are likely to remain non-readers in Grade Four.Spearheaded by the Dudley Grant Memorial Trust, in association with the Education Ministry through the ECC, the Expo is being held under the theme: ‘Stimulating Early Childhood Development in Jamaica’, and will feature innovations in Early Childhood education and development.The event will take place on Tuesday (July 7) at the Jamaica Pegasus Hotel in Kingston, and will run from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Established in 1989, the Dudley Grant Memorial Trust has responsibility for encouraging innovative approaches to early childhood teaching and learning, through its extensive research into the development and application of the newly revised early childhood curriculum.last_img read more

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Mental health support for small business

first_imgMental health support for small business The Morrison Government is putting the mental health of small business owners first with the with the launch of a coaching and support program.NewAccess for Small Business Owners will provide free, confidential and tailored mental health coaching to small business owners.The program is part of the Government’s $7 million BusinessBalance initiative, announced in the 2020-21 Budget. BusinessBalance provides immediate, short-term support of mental and financial wellbeing for small business as it recovers from the COVID-19 pandemic.Minister for Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business, Senator the Hon Michaelia Cash, said Australia’s small businesses are the backbone of our economy, and yet small business owners suffer more from depression and anxiety than the general population.“Despite collectively employing more Australians, small business owners have the fewest resources to deal with their own needs, including their mental health. The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated this, putting our small business owners under even more financial and emotional pressure,” Minister Cash said.“That’s why it is crucial to our economy that small business owners get the support they need towards recovery from COVID-19 and beyond.”Developed by Beyond Blue, in partnership with the Australian Small Business and Family Enterprise Ombudsman, NewAccess for Small Business Owners is designed to help small business owners who are feeling overwhelmed about everyday life issues, which may be caused by business challenges, staffing, relationships, health or loneliness. Coaches will have a small business background.BusinessBalance also includes the Counting on U program, delivered through Deakin University, which is a free and professional development program that builds the mental health knowledge of trusted business advisers.The advisers are trained in mental health first aid and relationship-building skills so they can recognise signs of mental and financial stress in small business owners and connect them to specialised services. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:AusPol, Australia, Australian, Deakin University, depression, employment, Government, loneliness, mental health, Morrison, Morrison Government, Ombudsman, professional development, Skills, Small Business, small business owner, universitylast_img read more

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Deposit taking measures protect financial stability and New Zealanders

first_imgDeposit taking measures protect financial stability and New Zealanders Hon Grant Robertson Cabinet has finalised a package of new measures to protect New Zealanders’ interests in the banking and financial system, including guaranteeing deposits of up to $100,000 per eligible institution.These measures, the final part of a comprehensive review of the Reserve Bank of New Zealand Act, have been the subject of extensive consultation. They will help protect New Zealand’s financial system and wider economy from damage that could be caused by excessive risk taking by the deposit taking sector and any resulting failures of institutions, Grant Robertson said.“While New Zealand’s financial system is sound and well positioned to withstand the stress posed by COVID-19, these reforms ensure the Reserve Bank is better equipped to protect and promote financial stability in the future.“Taken together, the recommendations will considerably strengthen New Zealand’s financial system safety net and contribute to a robust framework of protections for depositors. It also brings our protections into line with those in place overseas.“We originally proposed a $50,000 limit for deposit protection but after listening to feedback this has been increased to $100,000. This will fully protect 93 percent of depositors.“When enacted, these measures mean individuals will have up to $100,000 of their deposits in any eligible institution guaranteed in the event of the failure of an institution.“As well as instituting the deposit guarantee scheme, the measures we have confirmed today will improve regulation and supervision of deposit takers and strengthen New Zealand’s financial crisis framework.”Drafting of the legislation will now get underway, with the Bill expected to be introduced to Parliament towards the end of the year. The aim is to have deposit insurance up and running in 2023,” Grant Robertson said.The reforms will also include a new process for setting lending restrictions, such as loan-to-value ratios.“This will give the Minister of Finance a role in determining which types of lending the Reserve Bank is able to directly restrict. The Reserve Bank will then have full discretion to decide which instrument is best suited to use and how the restrictions are applied,” Grant Robertson said.“As with other prudential requirements, lending standards policies will be subject to more general requirements such as consultation with other government agencies and the public, and the Reserve Bank needing to have regard to the Minister of Finance’s Financial Policy Remit.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:banking, covid-19, Economy, failure, finance, financial crisis, Government, insurance, legislation, Minister, New Zealand, parliament, regulation, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, Robertson, runninglast_img read more

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WSU Vancouver to kick off Black History Month

first_imgWSU Vancouver to kick off Black History MonthPosted by ClarkCountyToday.comDate: Saturday, February 1, 2020in: Community Newsshare 0 Black History Month kicks off with ‘Oh Freedom: Commemorating the Spiritual and the Underground Railroad’ from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Tue., Feb. 4 VANCOUVER — Washington State University Vancouver recognizes Black history is American and world history every day throughout the year. During February, Black History Month, WSU Vancouver will create intentional space to honor the achievements, contributions and lived experiences of peoples of the African and Black diaspora.Wesley Williams IIWesley Williams IIBlack History Month at WSU Vancouver kicks off with “Oh Freedom: Commemorating the Spiritual and the Underground Railroad” from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Tue., Feb. 4 on campus in Firstenburg Student Commons, Room 105. This event is free and open to the public. RSVP at vancouver.wsu.edu/events.H.L. Wright IIH.L. Wright II“Oh Freedom” commemorates the powerful connection of the spiritual and the Underground Railroad through five dramatic movements. Carefully selected prose narratives from historical scholars, poems from specific time periods and spirituals that align with the text will give you the opportunity to commemorate the fusion of narrative and song to describe the evil, ugliness and authentic beauty of this significant time in U.S. and world history. Wesley Williams II is the creator and producer of “Oh Freedom.” He performs with H.L. Wright II.About WSU VancouverWSU Vancouver is located at 14204 N.E. Salmon Creek Ave. in Vancouver, east of the 134th Street exit from either I-5 or I-205, or via C-TRAN bus service. Find a campus map at vancouver.wsu.edu/map. Parking is available at meters and in the Blue Daily Pay lot for $4.If you have a disability that requires special materials, services or assistance, contact the Access Center at (360) 546-9238 or [email protected] as soon as possible to discuss your specific needs.As one of six campuses of the WSU system, WSU Vancouver offers big-school resources in a small-school environment. The university provides affordable, high-quality baccalaureate- and graduate-level education to benefit the people and communities it serves. As the only four-year research university in Southwest Washington, WSU Vancouver helps drive economic growth through relationships with local businesses and industries, schools and nonprofit organizations. Information provided by WSU Vancouver Communications.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Clark CountyVancouvershare 0 Previous : CCHM Speaker Series: “Buffalo Soldiers in Clark County’ launches 2020 schedule Next : It’s Love Your Pet Month at Beacock MusicAdvertisementThis is placeholder textlast_img read more

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University Of North Carolina Professor To Deliver Third Annual Robert C. Lester Lecture At CU-Boulder March 21

first_imgThomas A. Tweed, professor of religious studies and associate dean for undergraduate curricula at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is the guest lecturer for the 2001 Annual Robert C. Lester Lecture on the Study of Religion at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Tweed will present “On Moving Across: Diaspora, Religion and the Interpreter’s Position” on March 21 at 7:30 p.m. in Eaton Humanities, room 250. A reception will immediately follow the lecture and both are free and open to the public. “Professor Tweed’s visit fits the current research interests and teaching activities of the department very well. We have faculty members engaged in research and teaching on Buddhists, Muslims, Hindus, Latin Americans and other immigrant religious communities in America,” said Fred Denny, chair of the department of religious studies. “We also have a major interest in understanding and teaching about the ways in which diverse religions in America affect each other and the society in general.” Tweed received his graduate education at Harvard and Stanford and has authored or edited four books. His research has considered broader issues in the study of North American religions and most of his historical and ethnographic analysis has focused on religions in the United States, especially Roman Catholicism and Asian religions. The Robert C. Lester Lectureship on the Study of Religion was inaugurated in 1999 at CU-Boulder by the faculty of religious studies. Lester, professor emeritus of religious studies, joined the CU faculty in 1970 with a mandate to establish a program for the academic study of religion. The major in religious studies was approved in 1972. Lester directed the program until it attained departmental status in 1980, after which he was chair from 1980 to 1982 and from 1988 to 1991. He was honored with the University Medal in 1982. Lester is the author of “Ramanuja on Yoga, Theravada Buddhism in Southeast Asia” and “Buddhism: The Path to Nirvana” as well as numerous articles and book chapters on Hinduism. The department of religious studies offers comprehensive programs leading to bachelor’s and master’s degrees in religious studies. For more information, call (303) 492-8041 or visit the Web site at http://www.colorado.edu/ReligiousStudies. Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: March 8, 2001 last_img read more

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4 things to know about getting food this semester

first_imgSewall is now open Monday – Friday from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Published: Aug. 25, 2020 Students with meal plans may grab multiple meals in one visit – you will be able to swipe up to four times per visit at dining centers. Beginning Aug. 27: Alferd Packer Grill will be open Monday – Friday for breakfast from 8:30 a.m to 11 a.m. and from 10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m for lunch; Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. for brunch. Block meal plans will not be available for purchase.  Off-campus students can access retail markets, restaurants and cafes. Campus Cash and credit/debit cards will be accepted.  Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mailcenter_img Beginning Sept. 8: UMC Market will be open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.For updates on dining venues and hours visit the Campus Dining website.What if I don’t want to eat the same thing everyday? You don’t have to! Campus Dining Services has 14 different locations with different cuisines so you can switch it up. The C4C and Village Center have multiple stations with internationally inspired cuisine and The Alley @ Farrand has burger and pizza options. Order ahead at CU on the Run for a quick sandwich to go. Visit the Bakery or Starbucks for your morning coffee and pastry, or the WeatherTech Cafe for later night sandwiches and pizza. Our retail markets are great for grabbing quick snacks, beverages or everyday essentials. The Village Market also proudly serves Starbucks coffee. How can I order meals ahead of time?To order meals ahead of time for pick up, campus community members can use the Nutrislice app or the Nutrislice website to place orders at CU on the Run, the Alley @ Farrand, Sewall Dining Center, SEEC Cafe and WeatherTech Cafe. The Nutrislice app and website will allow you to view menus, filter menus based on dietary needs and preferences, place your order and schedule pick-up. You’ll then be able to pay with a meal plan, Campus Cash or a credit/debit card where accepted and pick-up your food to eat outside of the dining area. To download the app, search for Nutrislice through your phone or tablet’s application platform.For up-to-date information, visit the Dining Services web page or check out our list of Frequently Asked Questions.Categories:Deadlines & AnnouncementsCampus Community WeatherTech Cafe and WeatherTech Market are now open Wednesday – Sunday from 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. Students can use the new Nutrislice app and website to view menus and order ahead at select Campus Dining Services locations.I have a special diet – where can I get food? You can eat in any of our dining locations. Campus Dining Services has always been dedicated to accommodating various dietary needs and preferences, including allergen free options and vegetarian and vegan meals. You can use the new Nutrislice website to filter menus based on your needs. Our staff dietitian, Lisa Whelan, is on hand to answer any questions you might have about navigating our dining centers with any kind of dietary restrictions, eating healthy or the sourcing of foods served in our dining centers. Extended Dining HoursVillage Market is now open Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Campus Dining Services is excited to welcome you to campus! We have always prided ourselves on serving our students and campus community a variety of delicious and healthy dining options that meet the different needs and tastes of our diners. To ensure the health and safety of our campus community, we have made a few adjustments to our dining operations.What will eating on campus look like this year? Campus dining will operate a little different this semester: All dining centers, the Alferd Packer Grill in the UMC and our grab-n-go locations will be open to residence hall students only. All dining options will be grab-n-go only and some may require ordering ahead.last_img read more

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