Category: layaqimawkwf

Crypto firm strikes client disclosure deal with CRA

first_img Share this article and your comments with peers on social media The agreement follows the CRA’s filing of a federal court application seeking an order to compel disclosure from the firm on all accounts and trading activity, ostensibly to ensure compliance with tax laws.On March 19, a federal court judge issued an order requiring the company to provide the CRA with disclosure for a subset of its clients — including clients with accounts worth $20,000 or more at year-end between 2014 and 2020, and the 16,500 largest traders in terms of volume in those years.“Instead of providing the CRA with all client data dating back to 2013 as was initially requested, Coinsquare and the CRA have agreed that information relating to 90-95% of our clients will not be disclosed,” the company said in a statement.“Coinsquare negotiated to protect our client’s privacy, and limit any disclosure to only what was absolutely required by the CRA under Canadian tax law,” it said.“We believe this agreement is a partial but significant victory for Coinsquare and the digital asset industry in Canada,” the firm said. “We hope that our victory will set a precedent for other companies in the cryptocurrency industry to defend their clients’ privacy and to limit any disclosure to only what is absolutely required under Canada’s tax law.” Keywords Cryptoassets,  Tax auditsCompanies Canada Revenue Agency BoC digital currency would be greener than Bitcoin, deputy says Cryptoasset exchange Coinsquare Ltd. said it scored a “partial victory” in negotiations with the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) over the disclosure of its clients’ account history and trading data.The Toronto-based firm announced that it reached a deal with the CRA that requires it to turn over data on only its largest customers. Bitcoin surge doesn’t affect damages, B.C. court says James Langton Related news U.S. businesses may have to report crypto assets to IRS Bitcoin Electronic Crypto Currency Exchange Concept Illustration arrow/123RF Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

Read More

Better train services right on schedule as drivers sign up

first_imgBetter train services right on schedule as drivers sign up The Marshall Government’s commitment to deliver better services for train passengers is another step closer, with experienced private service provider Keolis Downer Pty Ltd set to operate the Adelaide Metropolitan Passenger Rail Network from the end of this month.In total, 83 train drivers have accepted an offer of employment with the private provider – with the deadline to accept a formal offer closing at midnight last night. Claims that only a handful of drivers would transfer were never accurate.Therefore, up to approximately a further 57 train drivers will be made available to Keolis Downer for a period of up to 18 months to ensure passengers continue to have access to all existing services.Treasurer Rob Lucas said this staffing approach was similar to the one taken by the former Labor government when then Treasurer Tom Koutsantonis privatised the Lands Titles Office in 2017 – in a $1.605 billion sugar-hit for government coffers.Under Labor’s deal, the new private provider – Land Services SA (LSSA) – required the State Government to make a significant proportion of their existing workforce (61 out of 160 people) available for up to an initial 2 years for the processing of land transaction services.“Our approach is entirely consistent with the one taken by the former Labor government – and then Treasurer Tom Koutsantonis and Transport Minister Stephen Mullighan – who made available an extra 61 government employees to the private provider for up to 2 years in addition to the 51 Transport Department staff who elected to move across to LSSA,” said Mr Lucas.“In fact, Mr Koutsantonis described his privatisation as ‘an absolutely outstanding result for the state’ and promised South Australians ‘will not notice any difference to the service following the transfer’.“In contrast, the Marshall Government still owns all the rail assets, including tracks, trains and stations and will continue to have control of fare price, revenue and standards for service levels.”“And it should be noted, some government employees within Rail Operations will continue to be required in the public sector, for example contract managers, because the rail assets will continue to be owned by the State.”Mr Lucas said the Government would be reimbursed by Keolis Downer the cost of utilising the additional drivers, who remain employed by the government. This contract will not only deliver better services but will also mean very significant savings to SA taxpayers. The Government’s estimate of $118 million over 12 years in savings remains.“We are committed to ensuring South Australians enjoy better train services through an improved system that, ultimately, increases public transport patronage,” Mr Lucas said.Background:Following a competitive tender process, Keolis Downer Pty Ltd, signed on to operate the Adelaide Metropolitan Passenger Rail Network from the end of January 2021.The EOI period for existing employees to indicate whether they were seeking an employment offer from the new service provider closed on Friday November 27. Employees had until midnight (December 31) to formally sign-up with Keolis Downer.Rail employees who have accepted an offer of employment from the new service provider and resign from the public sector are eligible for a $15,000 payment and 3-year employment guarantee. /Public News. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Adelaide, AusPol, Australia, deal, elected, employment, Government, Minister, public transport, revenue, SA, SA Government, South Australia, staffing, Transport, workforcelast_img read more

Read More

£23 million Seafood Disruption Support Scheme now open

first_img£23 million Seafood Disruption Support Scheme now open Seafood exporting businesses across the UK that have been affected by the challenges of adjusting to new requirements for exporting to the EU can apply from today for financial support from the UK Government.The UK-wide Seafood Disruption Support Scheme will provide up to £23 million of financial assistance to businesses that suffered a financial loss because of delays related to the export of fresh or live fish and shellfish to the EU during January 2021. The fund will be paid retrospectively to cover losses incurred between 1-31 January 2021.Alongside the Seafood Disruption Support Scheme, the UK Government has been offering targeted support to help exporters with new processes. This includes the Seafood Exports Working Group, meeting twice a week to troubleshoot issues raised by the industry; and a newly established Scottish Seafood Exports Task Force.Meeting for the first time this week, the taskforce will draw together government officials and industry representatives from the catching, processing and aquaculture sectors to specifically driving forward the seafood sector in Scotland.The fishing and seafood sector is also set to benefit from significant government investment with a £100m fund to help modernise fishing fleets, the fish processing industry, and rejuvenate a historic and proud industry in the UK, on top of the £32m that will replace EU funding this year.The Seafood Disruption Support Scheme, first announced on 19 January, has been made available in recognition of the unique circumstances currently affecting the seafood exporting sector at a time when the industry is facing lower market prices and demand due to the pandemic.The scheme, administered by the Marine Management Organisation (MMO) on behalf of Defra, is a UK-wide fund offering financial assistance based on a proportion of losses that can be verified up to a maximum of £100,000 per business.Fisheries Minister Victoria Prentis said:Seafood exporting businesses across the UK can apply from today for support from this £23 million scheme, reflecting the unique challenges faced by the sector.We will continue to work closely with the fisheries and seafood industry through our Seafood Exports Working Group to troubleshoot any issues that cause delays to the export of these highly perishable goods.UK Government Minister for Scotland David Duguid said:While recognising that huge efforts went into preparing for the required changes as we exited the EU, there are many who have incurred losses through no fault of their own. The UK Government is, therefore, stepping up with the Seafood Disruption Support Scheme.I have been engaging with the industry for many months and continue to work with all sections of the seafood sector in Scotland as we move to maximise future opportunities and adapt to new rules.Secretary of State for Wales, Simon Hart said:The Seafood Disruption Support Scheme highlights the UK Government’s commitment to Welsh exporters who are currently facing a uniquely challenging period.We want to back our fantastic Welsh businesses and I encourage all who are eligible to apply for this support.Qualifying businesses for the Seafood Disruption Support Scheme must be registered at Companies House or have evidence that they are a sole trader, partnership or other legal entity, and must meet the following conditions: having fewer than 250 employees, an annual turnover of under £36 million, and less than £18m on their balance sheet.Applicants must be able to evidence the expected value of the consignment. Shipments affected by export rules that prevent the movement of goods to the EU will be outside the scope of the scheme.The call for applications closes on 28 February 2021 and, if successful, payments are expected to be issued during March. Further eligibility conditions apply and are outlined in the full scheme guidance published on the MMO website.The Marine Management Organisation also offers a ‘one stop shop’ for export guidance; Defra and HMRC will also be offering targeted, proactive and hands-on support to fisheries exporters to help them successfully meet the new requirements. This includes new training package and focused workshop sessions. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Employees, EU, Europe, Fisheries, fishing fleets, Government, industry, Investment, Scotland, scottish, Secretary, secretary of state, UK, UK Government, Victorialast_img read more

Read More

Minister Bibeau announces support to help spur innovation for Quebec pork producers

first_imgMinister Bibeau announces support to help spur innovation for Quebec pork producers From: Agriculture and Agri-Food CanadaToday, while speaking at the Annual General Meeting of the Éleveurs de porcs du Québec, the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, the Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau, announced over $922,000 through the AgriScience Program for two Québec pork organizations, which will help advance innovation within the sector.Today, while speaking at the Annual General Meeting of the Éleveurs de porcs du Québec, the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, the Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau, announced over $922,000 through the AgriScience Program for two Quebec pork organizations, which will help advance innovation within the sector.Swine Innovation Porc is receiving up to $356,525 to improve swine health in Canada by developing a new vaccine against Streptococcus suis to reduce the use of antimicrobials and expand strain coverage.The Centre de développement du porc du Québec (CDPQ) is receiving up to $565,562 for a research project aimed at reducing nitrogen output while maintaining growth performance and meat quality.Quebec pork producers continue to adopt cutting-edge approaches and technologies to enhance their competitiveness and position themselves for a strong and vibrant future, while responding to the challenges brought by COVID-19.Quotes“Quebec’s pork producers work hard every day to take care of their animals and ensure we can continue to access their high-quality products. The investments announced today will help drive innovation for pork producers in Quebec through cutting-edge research and science. Now more than ever, it’s important to invest in the future and find new ways to advance innovation and sustainable growth, and these projects will do just that.”– The Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food“Disease related to Streptococcus suis is one of the most common infectious problems reported on Canadian swine farms. Outbreaks of S. suis can have detrimental economic impacts for producers, as it can result in decreased performance and increased pig mortality. Swine Innovation Porc would therefore like to thank the Minister and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada for its contribution of funding to support a project to develop a vaccine against S. suis. This project, led by Dr. Marcelo Gottschalk from University of Montreal, is an excellent example of how government, industry and the research community can work together to find solutions for industry’s challenges.”– Mr. Stewart Cressman, Chair, Swine Innovation Porc“Nitrogen excretion is a major concern for the sustainability of animal production. It is partly responsible for soil acidification, eutrophication and odours, and some nitrogen is also responsible for the production of greenhouse gases. One way to reduce the excretion of nitrogen is to optimize its use by animals. The CPDQ therefore wishes to thank the Minister and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada for their financial contribution to a project led by Marie-Pierre Létourneau Montminy of Université Laval, which aims to optimize nitrogen use by adjusting the provision of essential amino acids to pigs and broiler chickens to the animals’ needs.”– Laetitia Cloutier, agr, M.Sc., Senior Manager – Feeding and Animal Nutrition, Centre de développement du porc du Québec inc.Quick factsThe AgriScience Program, an initiative under the Canadian Agricultural Partnership, aims to accelerate the pace of innovation by providing funding and support for pre-commercial science activities and research that benefits the agriculture and agri-food sector and Canadians.The Canadian Agricultural Partnership is a five-year (2018-2023), $3-billion investment by federal, provincial and territorial governments to strengthen and grow Canada’s agriculture and agri-food sector.Founded in 2010, Swine Innovation Porc is a not-for-profit organization committed to facilitating research in the Canadian swine sector. Its nine members include the Canadian Pork Council and eight provincial pork producer organizations.The Centre de développement du porc du Québec (CDPQ) is a not-for-profit organization founded in 1992 under an initiative of the ministère de l’Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l’Alimentation du Québec. Its mission is to optimize research, innovation and knowledge transfer to grow a successful and sustainable pork sector. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Agriculture, Canada, community, Government, industry, innovation, Investment, mortality, nitrogen, nutrition, production, research, sustainability, sustainable, university, University of Montreallast_img read more

Read More

To perform with less effort, practice beyond perfection, says new CU study

first_imgContact: Alaa Ahmed, [email protected] Jim Scott, [email protected] Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Whether you are an athlete, a musician or a stroke patient learning to walk again, practice can make perfect, but more practice may make you more efficient, according to a surprising new University of Colorado Boulder study.The study, led by CU-Boulder Assistant Professor Alaa Ahmed, looked at how test subjects learned particular arm-reaching movements using a robotic arm. The results showed that even after a reaching task had been learned and the corresponding decrease in muscle activity had reached a stable state, the overall energy costs to the test subjects continued to decrease. By the end of the task, the net metabolic cost as measured by oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide exhalation had decreased by about 20 percent, she said.“The message from this study is that in order to perform with less effort, keep on practicing, even after it seems as if the task has been learned,” said Ahmed of CU-Boulder’s integrative physiology department. “We have shown there is an advantage to continued practice beyond any visible changes in performance.”A paper on the subject was published in the Feb. 8 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience. Co-authors on the study include postdoctoral fellow Helen J. Huang and Professor Rodger Kram, both in CU-Boulder’s integrative physiology department. The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health.The study involved 15 right-handed test subjects who used a handle on a robotic arm, similar to a joystick, to control a cursor on a computer screen.  The tasks involved starting from a set position to reach for a target on the screen and involved both inward and outward arm movements, Ahmed said.  As part of the study, test subjects had to exert more energy in some reaching movements when the robotic arm created a force field, making subjects “push back” as they steered the cursor toward the target.  With repeated practice of moving the robotic arm against the force fields, the subjects learned the task by not only cutting down on errors, but effort as well, according to Ahmed.The test subjects first performed a series of 200 reaching trials with no force field to push against, then two sets of 250 trials each when pushing back against the force field.  The experiment ended with another 200 trials with no force field, said Ahmed. A metronome was used to signal the test subjects to move the robotic arm every two seconds toward the target during the trials.Each of the test subjects wore a nose clip and breathed through a mouthpiece to chart the rates of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production, a measure of metabolism. The research team also collected surface electromyographic data by placing electrodes on the six upper limb muscles used during reaching tasks: the pectoralis major, the posterior deltoid, the biceps brachii, the triceps long head, the triceps lateral head and the brachioradialis.  “What is unique about our study is that we are the first group to measure metabolic cost in addition to muscle activity while performing a physical reaching task,” said Huang, who performed most of the research and was first author on the Journal of Neuroscience paper. “The results are very surprising and challenge the widely held assumption that muscle activity entirely explains changes in metabolic cost.”The study suggests that efficient movements ultimately involve both efficient biomechanics and efficient neural processing, or thinking. “We suspect that the decrease in metabolic cost may involve more efficient brain activity,” Ahmed said.  “The brain could be modulating subtle features of arm muscle activity, recruiting other muscles or reducing its own activity to make the movements more efficiently.”The results could be applicable, for example, to stroke patients who have to re-learn to walk, Ahmed said. “The rehabilitation process should not necessarily stop if the patient reaches a plateau in performance,” Ahmed said.  Continued practice reduces the metabolic cost of the task, an indication the brain still may be learning something,” she said.“Using the robotic system, we can understand the principles underlying the control of human movement and can apply those ideas to design rehabilitation programs that may allow stroke patients to re-learn their movements faster, to retain that learning and to transfer that learning to other tasks as well,” she said.So whether it is playing a musical piece over and over again even after you have the notes and timing down cold, or throwing a ball or swinging a racket after your coach tells you things look great, there appears to still be a benefit to practicing, Ahmed said.  “Just because someone can perform the task well doesn’t mean there is not added benefit to continued practice.”For more information on CU-Boulder’s integrative physiology department visit http://www.colorado.edu/intphys/welcome/index.html. Published: Feb. 9, 2012 center_img “The message from this study is that in order to perform with less effort, keep on practicing, even after it seems as if the task has been learned,” said Alaa Ahmed of CU-Boulder’s integrative physiology department. “We have shown there is an advantage to continued practice beyond any visible changes in performance.” Categories:AcademicsScience & TechnologyCampus CommunityNews Headlineslast_img read more

Read More

Education Ministry to use Technology to Reach Students in Remote Areas

first_imgAdvertisements RelatedEducation Ministry to use Technology to Reach Students in Remote Areas Education Ministry to use Technology to Reach Students in Remote Areas EducationOctober 5, 2012 RelatedEducation Ministry to use Technology to Reach Students in Remote Areascenter_img RelatedEducation Ministry to use Technology to Reach Students in Remote Areas FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Education Minister, Rev. the Hon. Ronald Thwaites, has said that within the next few months, his Ministry will be rolling out a pilot plan, to use computer technology to offer teaching instructions in the areas of mathematics and literacy to students in remote areas of Jamaica. He stated that Jamaica is blessed to have a quality technological platform to facilitate the move. “The plan is… to provide the very best pedagogy, the most replete instruction in social affairs to our students in the most remote areas in Jamaica, in areas of weakness in mathematics and literacy. This is going to open a whole new vista of education for our people, a virtual epiphany of new opportunity,” the Education Minister said. He was speaking at the launch of the ‘The Flow in My School Technology Competition’ on Wednesday (Oct. 3) at the Wyndham Hotel in New Kingston. The competition, organised by telecommunication company Flow, in collaboration with Hewlett Packard (HP), Microsoft, and Jamaica Observer, is open to primary and secondary schools islandwide, with the winning institution to receive an upgraded computer laboratory. The Education Minister commended the companies for their investment in education, noting that a “technologically savvy, well equipped, better educated, socially adept workforce” is going to yield better customers, very good users of their services and more satisfactory employees. The ‘Flow In My School Technology Competition’ seeks to highlight excellence and best practices in the use of technology in schools across the island. Schools are required to submit entries to showcase how they use technology to enhance the teaching and learning environments, as well as how they are celebrating the 50th anniversary of independence. Eligible institutions must register online by October 12.  “Schools are going to compete for the grand prize, which includes eight all-in-one HP computers, electronic whiteboards as well as individual electronic prizes for the teacher as well as the participating student,” informed President and Chief Operating Officer of Flow, Michelle English. “There is quite a lot on the line, so I am looking forward to seeing some very interesting submissions from the various schools,” she said. She further informed that special programmes will be designed for the semifinalists and winning entry “that we are going to be putting up on Flow TV and share with Flow viewers across the island.”last_img read more

Read More

Marking Memorial Day & End of Ramadan

first_imgHomeLifeEventsMarking Memorial Day & End of Ramadan May. 27, 2020 at 6:00 amEventsFeaturedNewsMarking Memorial Day & End of Ramadaneditor1 year agofront linehomelessM.T.O. Tamarkoz Associationmemorial dayRamadanCourtesy photoCourtesy photoCourtesy photoCourtesy photo12Courtesy photoCourtesy photo On Memorial Day, Monday May 25, M.T.O. Shahmaghsoudi Schools of Islamic Sufism in 35 cities and nine countries around the world celebrated the end of Ramadan – a month of daily fasting and prayer – by delivering thousands of food and personal care packages to veterans and COVID-19 front line families in need, VA hospitals, and the homeless. As part of M.T.O.’s global COVID19 Initiatives, all M.T.O. centers around the world held food drives and distributions on the same day, in Canada, the United Kingdom, Spain, Germany, France, Denmark, Sweden, Australia, New Zealand and in 18 cities throughout the United States. SMPD officer Mashhoud Salehian spoke at the Los Angeles event.The M.T.O. Tamarkoz Association offers ongoing free online mediation and relaxation programs in response to the COVID-19 crisis. These programs are offered daily on Instagram and are conducted in English, Spanish, Hebrew, French, German, Farsi, Arabic, Urdu and Italian. Visit https://www.instagram.com/tamarkozapp for more information. M.T.O. Shahmaghsoudi School of Islamic Sufism is an international non-profit organization that spans five continents. The teachings of the school bring the message of knowledge, love, peace, tranquility and strength. Visit www.MTO.org for more information.Tags :front linehomelessM.T.O. Tamarkoz Associationmemorial dayRamadanshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentBig Oil loses appeal, climate suits go to California courtsLetter to the Editor – From the Greatest Generation to nowYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall6 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson17 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter17 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor17 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press17 hours agoNewsWedding boom is on in the US as vendors scramble to keep upAssociated Press17 hours agolast_img read more

Read More

O2/3 Ireland merger decision due from EC in November

first_img Luz verde a la fusión entre Telefónica y Liberty Global en el Reino Unido Previous ArticleOfcom unveils UK “white space” trialistsNext ArticleMopay strikes billing deal with Telefonica Digital Author The European Commission is to make a decision about whether to approve the €850 million tie-up between 3 Ireland and O2 Ireland by 6 November.The purchase agreement for Hutchison 3G UK to acquire 100 per cent of Telefonica’s Irish business was signed in June. The acquirer will pay €780 million in cash on completion, and a further €70 million dependent on meeting certain financial goals.When the deal was announced, Telefonica said the sale is part of its “ongoing policy of proactive management of its asset portfolio with the aim of increasing the company’s financial flexibility”.According to GSMA Intelligence, O2 Ireland had an estimated 1.5 million connections at the end of the third quarter, putting it in third place behind Vodafone (2.1 million) and Eircom’s Meteor (1.1 million).3 Ireland is currently placed fourth with 539,000 connections, meaning the combined business would approach the size of Vodafone, with more than 2 million connections and a 39 per cent market share.With the deal reducing the number of mobile operators from four to three, 3 may need to offer concessions to the European Commission if competition concerns are raised.3 UK has previously said the deal will give it “scale and financial strength necessary to compete even more aggressively in the market to the benefit of consumers”, and leaves it “optimally positioned to become the number one player in the Irish market by providing the best value and service to its customers”.Telefonica is working to reduce its debt including the sale of its Atento call centre business, floating part of its O2 Germany unit, and partnering with Central American investment fund Corporacion Multi Inversiones in this region. Tim joined Mobile World Live in August 2011 and works across all channels, with a particular focus on apps. He came to the GSMA with five years of tech journalism experience, having started his career as a reporter… More Read more Home O2/3 Ireland merger decision due from EC in November Related AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 03 OCT 2013 center_img Telefónica refuerza la seguridad de las cadenas de bloques Tim Ferguson Telefonica bolsters blockchain security Español Tags 3FinancialHutchisonIrelandO2RegulatoryTelefonicalast_img read more

Read More

Nokia, Elisa forge Finnish private network pact

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore3 17 FEB 2021 Previous ArticleITC to probe Ericsson, Samsung patent rowNext ArticleBlog: MWC Shanghai to provide China 5G showcase, Barcelona blueprint Nokia and Elisa joined forces to develop private mobile networks for Finnish enterprises, in an effort to boost digital transformation of the business sector.In a statement, the vendor said the tie-up will “drive industrial-grade private mobile network deployment” covering 5G technology, along with market development to accelerate organisations’ digitalisation efforts.The companies will deploy mission-critical private networks based on new and existing radio network infrastructure.Efforts will be initially focused on the maritime and ports sectors, mining, manufacturing, logistics and utilities.Nokia said the aim is to bring “automation, safety and productivity gains” for businesses by deploying IoT, machine learning and AI on private networks.In its own statement, Elisa highlighted the role of customer-specific mobile networks to guarantee “the bandwidth, data transfer speed and short delay agreed for the use of the organisation”.Elisa’s EVP of corporate customers Timo Katajisto said the collaboration will “take private network implementations to a new level”.Raghav Sahgal, president of Nokia Cloud and Network Services, added the pair will drive mobile networking growth “and establish Finland as a leader in this field”.The collaboration is part of a long-term partnership between the companies. Subscribe to our daily newsletter Back Tags Home Nokia, Elisa forge Finnish private network pact Related Nokia scores Philippines 5G deal with Dito Yanitsa joins Mobile World Live as a Reporter based in London. She has more than 5 years’ experience at various media outlets in her home country Bulgaria. She started her career as a political reporter, followed by taking editor roles… Read more Yanitsa Boyadzhieva ElisaNokiaprivate 5G networks Nokia makes AI move with Microsoft Author ZTE pushes flexibility, simplicity in private 5G networkslast_img read more

Read More

Judge Upholds Congress’ Change to Wolf Status

first_img Email HELENA – The way Congress went about removing endangered species protections from the Northern Rockies gray wolf undermines the rule of law, but it did not violate the Constitution, a federal judge ruled Wednesday.U.S. District Judge Donald Molloy reluctantly upheld a budget rider passed by Congress in April that stripped wolves of federal protections in Montana, Idaho and parts of Washington, Oregon and Utah.The provision was inserted by Republican Rep. Mike Simpson of Idaho and Democratic Sen. Jon Tester of Montana. The measure marked the first time since the passage of the Endangered Species Act in 1973 that Congress forcibly removed protections from a plant or animal.Molloy, who twice blocked attempts to lift federal protections for the predators before Congress’ action, did not hide his distaste for the provision.“The way in which Congress acted in trying to achieve a debatable policy change by attaching a rider to the Department of Defense and Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011 is a tearing away, an undermining and a disrespect for the fundamental idea of the rule of law,” Molloy wrote in his order.But, he added, past rulings by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals requires him to interpret the rider as not violating the separation of powers, the constitutional principle ensuring none of the three branches of government tramples on the independence of the other branches.Conservation groups had challenged the rider’s constitutionality, arguing that it violated the separation of powers because its only aim was to countermand Molloy’s past rulings without making any changes to the Endangered Species Act.But the judge ruled against them, upholding the congressional rider because of what Molloy called “magic words” included in it.The budget rider directed the Interior secretary to remove wolf protections “without regard to any other provision of statute or regulation that applies to issuance of such rule.”The use of that exact phrase amends the Endangered Species Act by implication, Department of Justice attorneys argued, even if the rider didn’t reference the specific law.Molloy said the 9th Circuit has upheld that interpretation in the past so he must abide by it, even though he clearly disagrees with the appellate court.“In my view, the 9th Circuit’s deference to Congress threatens the Separation of Powers; nonspecific magic words should not sweep aside constitutional concerns,” Molloy wrote.It was not immediately clear whether the conservation groups planned to appeal Molloy’s ruling. Kieran Suckling, the executive director for the lead plaintiff in the case, the Center for Biological Diversity, said an appeal to the 9th Circuit is likely.Molloy’s order lays out a road map for a possible appeal, with the judge saying he believes Congress acted unconstitutionally but case law forces him to rule otherwise, Suckling said.“He did everything but buy us a bus ticket to San Francisco,” Suckling said, referring to the appellate court’s location. “That gives us hope that this isn’t dead yet.”Congress’ actions turned over wolf management to the Northern Rocky Mountain states except for Wyoming. There are an estimated 1,651 in Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Oregon and Washington.Idaho and Montana are planning to hold wolf hunts this fall to reduce the populations of the predator in those states.Tester said in a statement that now that the court has made its ruling, it’s time to move ahead.“Returning Montana’s wolves to Montana management was the right thing to do, and we did it in a responsible way with utmost respect to existing law and to our Constitution,” he said.Wolves in Wyoming were not included in the budget rider due to concerns among federal officials over a law allowing the predators to be shot on sight across most of the state.But earlier Wednesday, the state and the U.S. Department of Interior reached an agreement over how to end federal protections for wolves there.Wyoming would commit to maintaining at least 10 breeding pairs and 100 wolves outside Yellowstone National Park. There are now about 340 wolves in the state, of which 230 are outside the park. Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox.last_img read more

Read More