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Sony, Microsoft unveil latest joint AI play

first_img Related Sony’s semiconductor division and Microsoft announced a collaboration to develop AI video analytics systems for enterprise and industrial use, a year after the two inked a gaming-focused partnership.In a statement, the companies explained they plan to combine Sony Semiconductor Solutions’ image and sensing chips with Microsoft’s cloud and AI platform to produce advanced video analytics systems.The companies plan to embed Microsoft Azure AI capabilities into Sony’s recently launched IMX500 vision sensor, designed for use with enterprise smart camera systems. An app providing Azure IoT software will be designed to work alongside the chip to provide analytics.“This integration will result in smarter, more advanced cameras for use in enterprise scenarios as well as a more efficient allocation of resources between the edge and the cloud to drive cost and power consumption efficiencies,” the companies added.In addition to product developments, Microsoft and Sony will also work with other partners on video analytics research at Microsoft’s AI and IoT innovation labs.The latest collaboration adds to a cloud gaming and AI partnership designed to support their respective content streaming and gaming plays.At the time the two said they also planned to explore the possibility of working together on intelligent imaging solutions, leading to the latest announcement. Subscribe to our daily newsletter Back HomeDevicesNews Sony, Microsoft unveil latest joint AI play Google taps retail with NYC store AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 19 MAY 2020 KDDI leans heavily on Samsung in expanded 5G range Chris joined the Mobile World Live team in November 2016 having previously worked at a number of UK media outlets including Trinity Mirror, The Press Association and UK telecoms publication Mobile News. After spending 10 years in journalism, he moved… Read more Devices center_img Tags MicrosoftSony Sony launches compact 5G Xperia Author Previous ArticleTelecom Italia opens talks to hack down Inwit stakeNext ArticleSunrise, Salt Mobile plot Swisscom fibre challenge Chris Donkin last_img read more

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Brookhaven Releases Minutes From Closed Door Meetings

first_img For Whom The Bell Rings The city of Brookhaven released all of the minutes from its City Council executive session meetings for the past seven months on Friday.The minutes, with a redaction for privacy, are now available through open record requests.It’s in response to a complaint that The Brookhaven Post, a news website, filed with the state attorney general’s office.The website claims Brookhaven City Council members violated the Open Meetings Act. During some meetings, they alleged there were discussions that should have been public ─ like how the council would handle emails regarding a sexual harassment claim against former Mayor J. Max Davis.He allegedly sprayed the backside of an employee with Lysol as a joke.City Attorney Chris Balch said he personally reviewed more than six months worth of executive session minutes and recommended the council not release the minutes since it is not required.“Council elected to release it based on their decisions to let the citizens of Brookhaven know what’s going on because of the allegations that we’re covering things up and not playing according to Hoyle,” Balch said.He said they elected to release the minutes by a vote of 3-1 because of the city’s Sunshine Resolution, which provides open access to information about how city governments operate. Share Legal Advocate Discusses Medical Abuse At Shut Down Georgia ICE Facility ‘It’s Fractured’: Georgia Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan On Healing Republican Party Add to My List In My List Related Storieslast_img read more

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Work starts on new Wythenshawe Bus interchange

first_imgConstruction of Wythenshawe’s 5m bus and tram interchange is about to start..It is funded by Transport for Greater Manchester (TfGM) and Manchester City Council. It will have a TfGM Travelshop, a highly-visible bus supervisor’s office and cycle parking. The development will also support the wider regeneration of Wythenshawe town centre, with the release of land occupied by the current bus station on Rowlandsway.last_img

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Van Driver Critical after Oregon Ambulance Crash

first_imgBEAVERTON, Ore. (AP) – A collision near Beaverton, Ore., involving a minivan and an ambulance has left the van driver hospitalized in critical condition. However, the ambulance paramedics and their 90-year-old patient fared much better.Washington County sheriff’s Sgt. David Thompson says 51-year-old Beth Caulfield of Beaverton was reported in critical condition Thursday night at a Portland-area hospital.He says two Newberg Fire Department firefighter-paramedics were treated at a hospital and released after the Thursday afternoon crash. Thompson says 90-year-old Mary Schollenberg was being transported in the ambulance for a broken hip. She did not suffer any major injuries from the crash.last_img read more

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Schools to reopen September 8, districts to develop plans

first_imgVermont Business Magazine At a press conference Tuesday in Montpelier, Governor Phil Scott addressed school reopening and announced he will issue an Executive Order to set Tuesday, September 8, as the universal start date for student instruction.This action gives schools an additional one to two weeks to prepare staff and test the systems they’ve built over the summer to provide the best possible start for students when they return. The local school districts are charged with setting the manner of education. This could entail full in-person education, a hybrid system that would include part-time at school along with distance learning, or full distance learning. Guidelines for sports will not be ready until August.“School districts, school boards, teachers and administrators should take this extra time to make sure they, and their hybrid and online solutions, are ready and effective so we can deliver for our children and build confidence in the public education system’s ability to be flexible and responsive – because faith in the system is key to returning to in-person instruction,” said Governor Scott.Governor Scott was joined by Education Secretary Dan French, Health Commissioner Mark Levine, MD, and Rebecca Bell MD, MPH, FAAP, pediatric critical care physician at UVM Children’s Hospital and the president of Vermont’s chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics to discuss school reopening plans and address health considerations that inform the recommendations for in-person instruction.Pediatrician Rebecca Bell, MD, provided information on the importance on in-person education for preschool to 5th grade children and students with special needs. ORCA Media screen grab. See video below. Bell’s remarks begin at the 41-minute mark.The group emphasized the benefits of in-person instruction for children, especially those 10 and under, and the safety of doing so based on the state’s health guidance and Vermont’s low disease prevalence. While the Governor encouraged districts to work towards expanding the number of in-person instruction days, he recognized that many are beginning with a hybrid approach, which will give those districts time to build confidence in their systems.Commissioner Levine acknowledged the uncertainty of this virus has created concerns and questions for teachers, administrators and parents, and noted, “As health commissioner, when I weigh the health risks against the educational, developmental, social and emotional risks for young children, I come to the same conclusion as the pediatricians and education experts: now is the right time for Vermont to re-start in-person learning.”An Executive Order will be signed and issued this week to officially set this universal start date.Teachers have been among the most skeptical of how schools will reopen but their union offered supported remarks in a statement released just after the governor made his announcement.The Vermont NEA said in a statement: Governor Phil Scott’s order to delay resumption of instruction until at least September 8 is a good first step in ensuring Vermont schools are safe for students, educators, parents, and communities, according to the state’s largest union.“Vermont’s educators stand ready to work with school boards, administrators, health experts, and parents to ensure the safe resumption of instruction,” said Don Tinney, a high school English teacher who serves as president of the 13,000-member Vermont-NEA. “With today’s order, the governor has paved the way for an orderly, phased-in approach to reopening our schools.”The union’s phased-in approach has four steps:Phase One: Allow teachers, paraeducators, and all other relevant school employees to have uninterrupted time together to prepare for the return of children to classrooms, plan for distance learning, conduct staff training, and coordinate pandemic preparedness. This first phase is also where local education associations and local boards should negotiate over changes to working conditions caused by the pandemic. This two-week phase would begin in late August and end on September 8.Phase Two: Allow teachers and other educators to meet with students and families either in-person or remotely, as public health conditions warrant. This time will be used for social-emotional wellness checks, basic needs assessment, an evaluation of families’ technology needs, explaining curricular programming and academic expectations, and reconnecting with students, families, and colleagues. This phase will last until school districts can verify that they are safely able to transition to the next phase.Phase Three: This phase is the resumption of teaching and learning, whether in-person, fully remote, or a hybrid approach. Districts can transition to this phase only after they adhere to locally approved plans and state mandates, and, critically, provide formal verification to the Agency of Education that they are able to meet important health, safety, and staffing standards.Phase Four: This phase is an ongoing assessment of where we stand and, using public health data and educational progress, adjusting plans as necessary.“Health and safety must be our first priority,” Tinney said. “By working together in a methodical, orderly way, I hope we can avoid the mistakes that would endanger our students, educators, parents, and communities.”  Click here to view the full press conference or see below(link is external).Transcripts Courtesy of Governor’s OfficeGovernor Scott Transcript: Seven weeks ago, Dr. Levine, Secretary French and I spoke at a press conference(link is external) and set a clear goal: To return to in-person instruction for our kids in the fall.At the same time, we recognized how unpredictable this pandemic is, and the anxiety it can and has caused. So, our planning included remote learning and hybrid models as alternatives.  These approaches were in our guidance for schools, issued on June 17(link is external), developed by a large group of health and education experts and stakeholders including experts from the Department of Health and Agency of Education, NEA members, the Superintendents Association, Principals Association, Vermont Council of Special Education Administrators, and most importantly, pediatric infectious disease experts.Our core principle throughout has been to give guidance that helps school districts find safe ways to provide every child with an education that is as good or better than before the pandemic.As you just heard from Dr. Levine and Dr. Bell, as well as other public and pediatric health experts, including some who are also parents of school-aged children, they encourage in-person instruction, especially for kids 10 and under. I often talk about the importance of “listening to the experts, and the science” so to be clear, Dr. Levine and Dr. Bell, alongside Dr. Kelso and Dr. Raszka, who spoke on this issue a few weeks ago(link is external), are experts on the potential for spread in our communities and in school settings. They also recognize the negative social and developmental consequences of not having in-person instruction.These experts have also looked at studies from countries that have put kids back to school, our experience with childcare centers and summer camps, and the capacity we have built to contain clusters and outbreaks.With this knowledge, they continue to recommend kids be in school in areas like Vermont, with a low number of cases, and who have the ability to quickly contain the outbreaks when they do occur.Even Dr. Fauci has recognized the importance of opening our schools in areas with low positivity rates.This is why we put an emphasis on opening for in-person instruction to the greatest extent possible, especially for younger students and those with special needs.But, at the same time, we have to recognize – and plan for – the reality that our data could change before the start of school and the other reality is, we’ll continue to see cases of COVID-19 in Vermont and will also see some in schools.We also know there is not a “one-size-fits-all” plan for our hundreds of schools because each are a bit different. As well, due to our state school structure we must also respect the local decision-making process.This is why the guidance was developed to encourage flexibility with three primary options: First, full remote learning, like what we did in the spring, but hopefully much better. Second, a hybrid model, offering a mix of in-person instruction and remote learning. Or third, full in-person learning.Now as district plans roll in, we’re seeing many, but not all, starting with the hybrid model with kids being in-person only a few days a week. But there are others offering full in-person instruction.While Vermont’s data, the science, and the expert advice would allow for more in-person instruction than many schools are currently planning, I understand the need for caution and the need for school staff, parents and children to ease into this to gain confidence.  Just like we’ve turned the spigot slowly in our economic restart, it makes sense for some to start with this more conservative approach.Beginning with a hybrid model gives school staff and parents time to test the waters and work through some of the stress and anxiety that exists in a situation like this, where we know things could change, and we need to be nimble.Because whichever option a district chooses, it will be new and different, like this hybrid model, and we want schools to take the time to get this right so students can hit the ground running.With that in mind, I’ll issue an Executive Order later this week, setting Tuesday, September 8 as a universal start date for students. We’ll also work with the Legislature to change the requirements of the school calendar to give districts greater flexibility.This will give schools one-to-two additional weeks to work with staff, test the systems they’ve built, and fine tune them if needed. School districts, school boards, teachers and administrators should take this extra time to make sure they – and their hybrid and online solutions – are ready and effective, so we can deliver for our children, and build confidence in the public education system’s ability to be flexible and responsive because faith in the system is key to returning to in-person instruction.Faith in our ability to contain clusters when they pop up is important too. That’s why we’ve worked hard to build up a testing and tracing system that can surround and contain clusters and outbreaks before they become widespread.Because, again, the reality is we’re going to continue to see cases and it’s possible some could involve a school, but we have an incredible and proven team that’s ready to act quickly to contain them.***Now, I want to be clear: None of this is ideal, but it’s our reality and I know anxiety is high, even while the health data and expert’s clearly support in-person instruction. And I can assure you, we will not hesitate to act to protect our students and school employees.  Fortunately, Vermont is in a much better position than most other states. In fact, we’re probably in a better position than any other state in the country right now to return to school – an opportunity to do what’s right for our kids and families because of how successful Vermonters have been in limiting the spread of this virus.While this pandemic has created countless challenges and obstacles, we owe it to our kids and their parents to provide them with the best possible education, preferably in-person, or a hybrid system that allows them to easily toggle between the two.Now, I know this won’t be easy. But I have faith in educators who have a big challenge before them but, also, a huge opportunity to help teach our kids about the value of being flexible, creative and resilient. And we know they are 100% committed to giving our kids the high-quality public education they deserve.Health Commissioner Mark Levine, MD, Transcript: Based on the trends we’ve been seeing for some time now, I continue to believe we’ve come to a point in our response to this virus that allows us to bring our children back to school – in a carefully considered, measured and safe way.I was just quoted in yesterday’s Vermont chapter of the AAP’s press release(link is external) calling for schools to prioritize in-person attendance for preschool through grade five and for students with special needs and stand by my statement of one week ago: “In Vermont, this is the right time to open schools. We have achieved a stage of viral suppression that will allow us to open schools comfortably.”To be clear, if we were in Arizona, Texas, Florida or countless other states, we would not be having this conversation. We would likely be planning a fully remote school year.At our press conference 10 days ago(link is external), Dr. William Raszka, UVM pediatric infectious disease specialist, and I again reviewed the data supporting our conclusions that: 1) younger children are less likely to transmit the SARS-CoV-2 virus, become infected, or develop severe disease; 2) that adults in a family are more likely to be the index case in an affected family, not the child; and 3) school-based studies from around the world have not shown significant transmission of COVID-19 within schools. Multiple European countries who have gotten disease transmission to low levels like Vermont have enjoyed great success in reopening their schools. And it is the youngest children up to age nine who are not only at lowest risk but stand to reap the most benefit from the in-person learning environment, as I am sure my pediatric colleague will speak more to.Of course, there are risks. As health commissioner, when I weigh the health risks against the educational, developmental, social and emotional risks for young children, I come to the same conclusion as the pediatricians and education experts: now is the right time for Vermont to re-start in-person learning.We in public health hear your fears and understand your concerns. Over the past few months, we’ve been learning from education leaders, school districts, administrators, teachers and staff – and we’ve been hearing from parents – about their specific concerns, pros and cons and considerations that must be made in planning for return-to-school, and have been adjusting our public health and educational guidance – which has been out for six weeks – accordingly.We know that one plan will not fit all, and schools are customizing their solutions to fit their specific needs. The three principles that have guided us in planning for return-to-school are to: 1) give every child a quality education; 2) allow for flexibility as the situation evolves, like every other aspect of this COVID pandemic; and 3) look for and share innovative solutions. When I say now’s the time, it is in recognition that our guidance was drafted based upon the health data as it currently looks, knowing it could change. I don’t mean that we will not see new cases, clusters or even limited outbreaks in our communities. But there are public health protocols in place for handling any such event – as we have demonstrated over the months with our capacity to limit the spread of disease through testing, tracing, interviewing and advising those who have been in close contact and possibly exposed to a person with COVID.When there are cases, the Health Department will inform communities about what is happening, without compromising the health privacy of individuals.And, as we are heading into flu season, there are bound to be rumors, misinformation and coronavirus scares swirling around in schools. Please know that the Health Department, the Agency of Education and your local schools districts are committed to telling parents and communities the truth about what is happening, and what actions schools, teachers, staff, parents and students should take in order to protect everyone in the community. And please, this year more than ever, take advantage of early immunization with flu vaccine for yourself and your family.The virus is not going away. But with the continued support of Vermonters and visitors, we can continue to keep transmission of the virus to a minimum – by wearing a mask when out and about, maintaining social distance from others not in our household, washing hands frequently, and staying home and away from others when we’re not feeling well. We must model this behavior and teach our children these practices – in school and at home.Dr. Rebecca Bell, MD, MPH, FAAP, Transcript: Yesterday the Vermont Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics put out a statement(link is external) calling on school districts to prioritize in person attendance for all students preschool through grade five and students of all ages with special needs.In the statement, we summarize the data around transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in children as well as the importance of in-person learning for children’s academic, social, and developmental needs. Our hope is that this summary of the current data can be useful for schools in their current planning for reopening and for schools who have already announced their plans as they periodically reassess the situation as the school year progresses.An enduring motto in my profession is that “children are not just little adults.” As we learn pediatric medicine, it’s tempting to think that children have the same anatomy and physiology as adults in just smaller packages. We learn instead that their physiology is unique in the way they respond to illness and that their bodies and minds have vastly different needs than adults, in times of illness and in health, hence the need for the field of pediatrics.All of that plays a role in what we’re talking about today: That we should be thinking about children and schools and COVID-19 in a different way than we’re thinking about other aspects of community reopening during this pandemic. And to get even more granular, we should think about younger children differently than we’re thinking about adolescents.Thankfully, young children who are typically the most susceptible to respiratory viruses seem to be the population that does the best with SARS-CoV-2. They are less likely to contract the virus, less likely to become seriously ill, and less likely to transmit the virus than adults or older adolescents. That combined with the fact that this is the same population that struggles the most with remote learning, makes prioritizing in-person education for our younger students a sensible goal here in Vermont.Children and families depend on schools for more than just education. We can and should have a conversation about the outsized role our public-school system plays in holding our communities together and whether we as a society place appropriate value on the work educators do (we don’t). But that is the reality we are currently faced with. As pediatricians, we miss working with educators to provide comprehensive services to families. We are worried about kids. I don’t have statewide data to share on the secondary impacts of this pandemic on kids and families. I can tell you from my experience and the experience of my pediatric colleagues that children and adolescents, especially the vulnerable, are really untethered right now. They are not doing ok. The loss of structure and routine, and consistent adult presence, and social and emotional connection has been really upending. I know that educators know this too, which is why they are working hard to get back to some semblance of routine and structure and connectedness this fall. We appreciate their efforts.If I could choose only one mitigation strategy with respect to school safety, it would be to keep community transmission low. What happens in the schools is a reflection of what’s happening in the community. The data we have now suggest that schools will most likely not be a main driver of transmission in this pandemic. They will instead mirror what’s happening in the community. We keep schools safe by keeping communities safe. So, while school officials are working hard on their plans to keep teachers and kids safe inside school walls, we have an even bigger burden to bear as members of the community in keeping positivity rates low. That means wearing a mask, following travel guidelines, keeping physically distant and staying home when sick.Lastly, I want to address the very real and valid reactions of confusion and distrust that exist from the mixed messages in response to this unprecedented and devastating pandemic. The national conversation around school reopening has raised legitimate concerns from teachers and families. That’s because much of the country is not at a place where they can safely reopen schools. But Vermont is uniquely poised to be moving towards in-person learning because our case positivity rates are so low and because we are using science to guide us. I ask Vermonters to take their gaze off the national scene and look towards our local leaders, those who know our communities best, and trust that they will provide the best guidance and most importantly, adapt the guidance in response to evolving evidence as needed.On a personal level, I am a pediatrician and a parent with two young children who are thriving now that they are back fulltime at their early childhood education center. I watched their center reopen, almost two months ago now, under the guidance of the Health Department and that process has been very reassuring to me. As the president of the Vermont chapter of the AAP, I have frequent meetings with national pediatric leaders and heads of other state chapters and those conversations have only reinforced my belief that the work that’s being done in our state, by our Health Department, has been done with thoughtfulness, with care, with intentional collaboration, with a willingness to adapt and change in response to local data, and always with an eye towards keeping our communities safe.To summarize:Kids are less likely to contract, get seriously sick from, and transmit the virus than adults. Younger kids even more so than adolescents. This is the same population that most benefits from in-person learning.Schools are a lot of things to a lot of people. Schools are where our children are educated but also where they receive nutrition, developmental and mental health support, and community connection. Kids are not doing okay without those things. Schools also play a critical role in addressing racial and social inequity.Vermont’s low rates of community transmission is exactly why we are talking about in-person learning. Keeping community transmission rates low is the key to keeping our schools safe.We all want to do what is best for children. As we continue to work collaboratively towards schools reopening, I hope that the consistently reassuring Vermont data can help schools in their reopening and periodic reassessment plans.Education Secretary Dan French Transcript: Coming into August, the anxiety levels around reopening schools have increased as school staff and parents alike contemplate the uncertainties around reopening schools for the fall semester.These uncertainties remain despite our planning at the state level and the hard work of implementation that is now occurring around the state in each school system.My household is not immune from this anxiety. As I work in a corner of a bedroom to plan and coordinate the state’s education response to this emergency, my wife, a veteran elementary school teacher, is at the dining room table making preparations for her classroom.I believe our uncertainty and anxiety about reopening schools is not caused by inadequate planning, but rather the fact that none us alone can fully control or predict how the virus will behave in the future. This lack of control, particularly for those of us accustomed to being in control, is unsettling.What we can do is pay attention to the science, keep our assumptions realistic and use our best judgment. To be successful, we must be flexible and be prepared to respond to what is happening, whether or not it fits into our plans, because our plans are just today’s best informed guess of what will happen in the future.That being said, we have learned a lot about this virus, and we know what works.We have learned that if everyone person does what they are supposed to do in terms of wearing a mask, washing their hands, staying home when sick and social distancing, that, together, we can have the opportunity to safely reopen our schools for in-person instruction.I say we can have the opportunity to reopen our schools because one of the main reasons we are able to contemplate reopening our schools in Vermont is that as a state, we have adopted a disciplined approach to managing the virus and have achieved a high level of its suppression.If these conditions were different, our plans to reopen schools would look totally different. Our plans put stock in our proven ability to continue to manage the virus together as a state.Our plans to reopen schools include:Measures to prevent the virus from entering the operational perimeter of a school district by mandating all students and staff complete a daily health check and requiring sick students and staff to stay home;Implementing stringent precautions inside a school such as the wearing of facial coverings to stop the spread of the virus if it does enter a school; andProvisions to manage symptomatic students and staff during the school day.These plans acknowledge we will likely have positive cases in our schools among students and staff. This is a hard reality to accept but it is the reality. If we can continue to maintain the high degree of suppression in our larger society, however, we can minimize the likelihood of positive cases emerging in our schools.The bottom line is that if the virus is in our communities, it will be in our schools. We all have to do our part to reopen schools by suppressing the virus in our communities. Reopening schools is not just the work of teachers and school administrators. To safely reopen our schools, everyone must wear a mask and do your part.We are building some flexibility into our instructional plans by allowing districts to utilize in-person instruction and remote learning and some combination of the two – what we are calling hybrid learning. This flexibility will be necessary to navigate changes in the public health conditions, but also necessary for our schools to reopen and to stay open.Based on my experience as a teacher, a principal and a superintendent, I know that school district operations are fragile from a logistical standpoint and highly dependent on human labor since education is fundamentally a humanistic endeavor. In spite of our best plans, schools or certain grades in schools might have to close for lack of staff such as teachers, bus drivers or paraeducators.The decision to give school districts the flexibility in choosing among in-person, remote or hybrid instruction is an operational necessity if we are going to maintain schools being open. And it is important that we strive to keep schools open since the stability of school activities are vital not only to our students but also to our communities.In the coming weeks, we will continue to focus our efforts at the Agency on supporting our school districts in this work. We will be minimizing the publication of new guidance in favor of supporting the implementation of the guidance we already have.We do have a few pieces of guidance that are in the works, notably guidance on sports which will be published in the coming week or so, and guidance on student supports, including guidance on special education and social and emotional support systems.Reopening our schools will require each community to follow state guidance and apply it in their unique settings to create local solutions that best meet the needs of their students. We cannot direct specific implementation solutions from the state level since we cannot anticipate all of the local factors.We can, however, trust in the professional expertise of our educators to do what is best for all of our students. At the state level, we will work closely with school districts to support them in this work, and to collect data on what is working well so we can identify opportunities to share these ideas more broadly across the state. And for our most vulnerable students, we will work with districts to ensure these students have the supports they need to be successful.This is uncharted territory, and I acknowledge there is a considerable amount of uncertainty and anxiety. I am confident we will be successful, however, if we can follow the science and trust in our own expertise and resourcefulness.Starting school after Labor Day gives us a bit of extra time to make these preparations. Let’s take advantage of this time to make sure the new school year can be as successful as possible.Click here(link is external), or see below, for a transcript of Governor Scott’s remarks.Click here(link is external), or see below, for a transcript of Commissioner Levine’s remarks.Click here(link is external), or see below, for a transcript of Dr. Bell’s remarks.Click here(link is external), or see below, for a transcript of Secretary French’s remarks.last_img read more

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Some details emerge on coronavirus cases, but many gaps remain

first_imgSep 26, 2012 (CIDRAP News) – A European report has filled in some details about the two severe illnesses linked to a novel coronavirus, but most of the major questions, such as where it came from and how it spreads, remained unanswered today.A 49-year-old Qatari man remained in a London hospital’s intensive care unit with a severe respiratory illness accompanied by renal failure. A 60-year-old Saudi Arabian man who had a similar illness and was infected with a virtually identical coronavirus died in June in his home country. No new confirmed or suspected cases were reported today.A risk assessment released by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) offered some new details on the cases, including that the Qatari patient had returned from a trip to Saudi Arabia more than 10 days before he fell ill on Sep 3, which seems to suggest that he wasn’t infected while in that country.A case definition released by the World Health Organization (WHO) yesterday lists a history of travel to Saudi Arabia within 7 days before illness onset, or close contact with a probable or confirmed case-patient in that same time frame, as a possible clue to the virus in a person who is hospitalized with an acute respiratory infection accompanied by fever and cough.A Sep 25 letter from the head of the United Kingdom Department of Health to UK health workers said the incubation period for the new virus is assumed to be 7 days, given what is known about other human coronavirus infections. The letter to UK National Health Service workers was written by Dame Sally C. Davies, chief medical officer.A then-novel coronavirus sparked the SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) outbreak in 2003, which involved more than 8,422 cases globally and killed 916 people, according to the ECDC risk assessment. Aside from the outbreak, human coronaviruses are mainly known for causing colds. Health officials have stressed that the new coronavirus is clearly different from the SARS virus.Both the Davies letter and the ECDC risk assessment said no suspected cases have been found among contacts of the Qatari patient or elsewhere. “Many of these contacts are already likely to be beyond the incubation period . . . when symptoms would have developed had they been infected,” Davies wrote.The ECDC said that as of yesterday it was not aware of “any increase in the number of patients with acute respiratory infections of unknown cause in intensive care units in Saudi Arabia or Qatar.”The ECDC statement filled in some new details on the 60-year-old Saudi Arabian who died. It said he fell ill on Jun 6, was hospitalized with severe pneumonia on Jun 13, and died on Jun 24.The fact that the two cases occurred 3 months apart and that time spent in Saudi Arabia is the only known link means that “independent non–human-to-human transmission must be considered” and that an animal source can’t be excluded, the ECDC said.In addition, it is likely that the novel virus caused both cases, but more evidence is needed to prove this, the agency said. It added, “It is not clear which laboratory tests are most applicable for detection of the novel coronavirus, and there is therefore an urgent need to validate the existing tests and to develop more specific ones.”Meanwhile, the UK Health Protection Agency (HPA) said today that the WHO “has convened relevant European laboratories to work collaboratively to produce clinically validated assays for real-time detection of the novel coronavirus.” The HPA also said that Ron Fouchier, PhD, of Erasmus Medical Center in the Netherlands, is expected publish the full genome of the virus from the Saudi Arabian man within a day or two.In other developments, the Hong Kong Centre for Health Protection (CHP) published some guidance related to the new coronavirus, including advice to schools and recommendations on personal protective equipment for helathcare personnel. Hong Kong served as the launching pad for the international spread of the SARS virus in 2003, after it emerged in mainland China in late 2002.See also: ECDC risk assessmentSep 25 Davies letter to NHS staffSep 26 UK HPA statement about development of molecular diagnostics for new virusHong Kong CHP guidance for schools and recommendations for healthcare workerslast_img read more

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Mercomar moves in San Lorenzo

first_imgThe turbine weighed 182 tons (165.1 tonnes) and measured 8.94 m x 5.3 m x 4.8 m; the generator tipped the scales at 134.1 tons (121.7 tonnes) and measured 8.9 m x 4.2 m x 3.6 m; while the condenser weighed 72 tons (65.3 tonnes) and had the dimensions of 11.6 m x 4.7 m x 4.8 m.All equipment was moved from Terminal Zarate using a range of hydraulic modular trailers and semi-trailers.www.robinsongroup.com.arlast_img

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TÜV Süd acquires SNC-Lavalin’s instrumented wheelset technology

first_imgEUROPE: TÜV Süd announced the acquisition of SNC-Lavalin’s IWT4 instrumented wheelset technology business on February 27, saying this would strengthen its position as a one-stop-shop for the independent assessment, testing and approval of rolling stock.The IWT4 instrumentation is applied to the wheelset without any structural modification, ensuring structural integrity is preserved. It was introduced in 2006, and is now used in the USA, China, Norway, Finland, India, Sweden and ‘many countries’ in central Europe. ‘IWT4 draws on over 50 years’ experience of producing instrumented wheelsets here in Sweden’, said Greg Riggall, General Manager of TÜV Süd’s rail business in Sweden. ‘After personally managing the development and commercialisation of the technology, I am thrilled that technology will continue to live on here in Stockholm under the TÜV Süd flag’.last_img read more

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Chinese enterprises in South Sudan donate food and relief items amid…

first_imgSouth Sudan confirms its fourth Covid-19 case South Sudanese Vice President Rebecca Nyandeng (L) and Hua Ning, Chinese Ambassador to South Sudan attended the handover ceremony of relief items donated by Chinese enterprises operating in the country, in Juba, capital of South Sudan, July 16, 2020. (Xinhua/Gale Julius)The Chinese Business Association in South Sudan (CBASS) donated food and relief items to the country as it battles the COVID-19 pandemic.Zhu Yan, the acting chairperson of CBASS, said the group provided 30 sets of tents, 200 mosquito nets, 100 bags of rice, 100 bags of wheat flour, and 2,000 liters of cooking oil to the office of Vice President Rebecca Nyandeng to help in the battle against COVID-19.He noted that Chinese traders have been supporting the government and people of South Sudan with relief assistance since the formation of their organization in 2015.“Under the leadership of the Chinese embassy, we will continue to strengthen the cooperation on infrastructure development, international trade, resources exploration, education, and medical industry,” Zhu said.“We encourage more Chinese enterprises to participate in the economic development of South Sudan and make better contributions toward economic development and bilateral communication between the two countries,” Zhu added.China has been at the forefront of Africa’s battle against the novel coronavirus that has killed more than 591, 000 people globally and over 14,400 in Africa.China has sent critical medical equipment and protective wear to more than 50 African countries to aid in their fight against the disease.The donations have been hailed as a show of the strong relations that the sides enjoy.Hua Ning, Chinese Ambassador to South Sudan said the latest donation will assist South Sudan to overcome the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.“We are glad to see that the business community here (South Sudan) is joining the efforts to combat COVID-19. With the joint efforts from the government, from the people and from the enterprises, we will overcome the difficulties and build a bright future for the country,” Hua said.“This is not the end for the Chinese government and Chinese business people to donate toward the fight against COVID-19. We believe that both the Chinese government and people will continue their support for South Sudan,” the envoy added.Related South Sudan confirms 72 more COVID-19 casescenter_img South Sudan reports fifth confirmed COVID-19 caselast_img read more

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College athletics: BPCC’s Falting named LSWA’s cross country Coach of the Year

first_imgKaty-Ann McDonald, LSU/10-26/20:36.4 Alex Eykelbosch, McNeese/SR/Lopez Classic/3-21/17:18.15 Hannes Burger, UL-Lafayette/FR/Florida Relays/3-28/3:50.30 Danielle Lorenz, UNO/JR/SLC Championships/5-3/148-7.0 Heptathlon 400 Meters RC Walbrook, LSU/FR/Miami Alumni Invitational/4-12/6183 Vojislav Gvero, UNO/FR/McNeese Relays/3-9/202-7.0 Hannes Burger, UL-Lafayette/FR/Mt. SAC Relays/4-28/14:29.01 Shot Put Freshman of the Year: Julia Palin, LSU – Fr., Norton, Massachusetts She won the NCAA indoors national championship in the long jump with a mark of 21-2.5 before following that up with an outdoors silver (22-0.25). She won silver in the long jump and high jump and bronze in the triple jump in the Southland championship outdoors meet. Rachel Misher, LSU/SR/NCAA East Prelims/5-24/53.14 Hollie Parker, LSU/10-26/20:48.2 Northwestern State junior Jasmyn Steels was named Field Athleteof the Year. Denzel Harper, LA Tech/JR/Texas Relays/3-27/25-5.5 Kiprotich Mitei, UL-Monroe/FR/SBC Championships/5-10/31:32.21 Cole McKnight, UL-Monroe/SO/Texas Relays/3-27/223-10.0 Adam Cortez, Southeastern/10-13/25:14.99 Northwestern State – Arrington, Carr, Flagler, Clarke/NCAA East Regionals/5-25/39.42 High Jump Leonard Ledgister, SUNO/FR/LSU Alumni Gold/4-20/51.82 Abigail O’Donoghue, LSU/SO/LSU Alumni Gold/4-20/5-11.25 LSU – Camel, Mosby, Flournoy, Terry/SEC Championships/5-9/3:02.09 Northwestern State – Jackson, Giles, Evans, Thompson/NCAA East Regionals/5-25/44.95 1500 Meters 800 Meters Tonea Marshall, LSU/JR/NCAA Championships/6-8/12.66 Bridgid Selfors, Tulane/SO/AAC Championships/5-10/38:22.97 Alissa Lander, McNeese/SO/SLC Championships/5-3/38:23.86 400 Meters Tyler Terry, LSU/JR/LSU Invitational/4-27/45.84 Long Jump Adam Wise, LSU/FR/LSU Alumni Gold/4-20/3:53.47 Frankie Griffin, UL-Lafayette/SO/La. Classics/3-15/5-9.75 200 Meters Runner, Newcomer of the Year: Arina Kleschukova, UNO – So., Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan Miguel Barrera-Lopez, McNeese/JR/J. Fred Duckett Twilight/4-20/14:39.07 MEN 1500 Meters JuVaughn Harrison, LSU/SO/NCAA Championships/6-5/26-11 Lebrun Nelson, UL-Monroe/SR/LSU Alumni Gold/4-20/51-0.25 Jaron Flournoy, LSU/SR/NCAA East Prelims/5-25/20.09 Julia Palin, LSU/10-26/20:21.4 Grace Walford, Southeastern/JR/SLC Championships/5-3/181-6 Men Triple Jump Tremayne Flagler, Northwestern State/SR/SLC Championships/5-3/13.87 Janar McNaughton, SUNO/SO/NAIA Championships/5-25/51.53 5000 Meters Discus Hammer Hannes Burger, UL-Lafayette/FR/SBC Championships/5-10/8:56.99 Tyler Terry, LSU/JR/Battle on the Bayou/4-6/20.50 Shaquille Singuineau, UL-Lafayette/McNeese Relays/3-9/54-6.5 Coach of the Year: Kent Falting, Bossier Parish CC McNeese – Smith, Smith, Brown, Syrie/Johnson NSU Invitational/4-12/40.32 Micah Larkins, Northwestern State/SR/LSU Alumni Gold/4-20/10.10 10000 Meters Falting, who is also the head cross country and girls track and field coach at Parkway, guided the Cavaliers to the NJCAA Region XIV title in their first year to participate in the meet. Ersula Farrow, LSU/SR/NCAA Championships/6-6/2:03.81 Arina Kleschukova, UNO/11-9/21:24.1 Decathlon SUNO – Campbell, Crooks, Ledgister, McNaughton/William Carey Last Chance/5-10/3:06.95 Lentz Similien, McNeese/SR/SLC Championships/5-3/6-8.0 Field, Freshman of the Year: Mondo Duplantis – LSU – Fr., Lafayette, Louisiana Emmanuel Rotich, Tulane/9-22/23:43.3 SUNO – Scott, Williams, Hinds, Bolton/NAIA Championships/5-25/45.46 Darko Rodakovic, McNeese/SR/Victor Lopez Classic/3-21/159-0.0 Ariyonna Augustine, LSU/FR/SEC Championships/5-9/11.39 Darryl Givens, UL-Monroe/SFA Kight Invitational/4-3/5752 Noel Baker, LSU/SO/Texas Relays/3-27/154-2.0 Rayvon Grey, LSU/JR/Texas Relays/3-27/26-5.0 — Triple Jump Hollie Parker, LSU/SR/LSU Alumni Gold/4-20/4:23.32 Eli Gaughan, LSU/FR/LSU Invitational/4-27/213-9.0 Carlos Zervigon, Tulane/JR/AAC Championships/5-10/31:30.64 Jake Norris, LSU/SO/SEC Championships/5-9/231-1.0 Cassandra Hill, LSU/JR/LSU Alumni Gold/4-20/11.53 Eric Hawkins, UL-Monroe/SO/SBC Championships/5-10/1:51.66 100 Meters Arthur Price, LSU/SR/NCAA East Prelims/5-26/13.59 Tommy Nedow, Southeastern/SO/Florida Relays/3-28/170-1.0 Sha’Carri Richardson, LSU/FR/NCAA Championships/6-8/10.75 Grant O’Callaghan, Southeastern/9-22/24:50      4×400 Relay Julia Palin, LSU/FR/NCAA East Prelims/5-25/34:34.20 Gladys Jerotich, McNeese/SR/LSU Alumni Gold/4-20/17:16.86 LSU – Marshall, Johnson, Misher, Richardson/NCAA Championships/6-8/42.29 Dominique Williams, UL-Lafayette/SO/Cole-Lancon Challenge/4-13/195-2.0 5000 Meters Akanni Hislop, LSU/JR/NCAA Championships/6-5/20.42 Ariyonna Augustine, LSU/FR/SEC Championships/5-9/23.40 Christian Boyd, LSU/SR/SEC Championships/5-9/50.49 200 Meters — Brittley Humphrey, LSU/JR/NCAA Championships/6-8//56.11 Mercy Abire, LSU/JR/Battle on the Bayou/4-6/20-10.75 WOMEN 110 Hurdles Ashley Davis, Southeastern/JR/SLC Championships/5-3/52-6.75 Emmanuel Rotich, Tulane/SR/Southern Miss Open/4-27/3:51.31 Courtesy of Kent Falting Sha’Carri Richardson, LSU/FR/NCAA Championships/6-8/22.17 Kyle Baudoin, UL-Lafayette/SR/La. Classics/3-15/17-0.0 Claire Meyers, UL-Lafayette/JR/LSU Alumni Gold/4-20/151-9 Rachel Misher, LSU/SR/Battle on the Bayou/4-6/23.56 The cross country team was also named an Academic All-Scholar Team by the NJCAA Cross Country Coaches Association. Sharon Jerono, UL-Monroe/JR/Southern Miss Open/4-27/10:28.32 Reagan Darbonne, Northwestern State/SO/NCAA Championships/6-6/13-9.25center_img 4×100 Relay Emmanuel Rotich, Tulane/SR/Payton Jordan Invitational/5-2/8:41.05 Jasmyn Steels, Northwestern State/JR/SLC Championships/5-3/42-0.5 Katy-Ann McDonald, LSU/FR/NCAA East Prelims/5-25/2:06.43 Lisa Gunnarsson, LSU/SO/SEC Championships/5-9/13-7.75 Javelin Ersula Farrow, LSU/SR/LSU Invitational/4-27/4:22.91 Mckenzie Melius, Tulane/SR/AAC Championships/5-10/10:27.88 3000 Steeplechase Southeastern – Coleman, Storr, Jones, Benson/Florida Relays/3-30/3:08.16 Kaitlyn Walker, LSU/SR/LSU Battle on the Bayou/4-6/5-9.25 MEN (8K) 4×100 Relay Jurnee Woodward, LSU/SO/SEC Championships/5-9/56.77 400 Hurdles Mondo Duplantis, LSU/FR/SEC Championships/5-9/19-8.25 800 Meters Kelsey Frank, Northwestern State/SR/LSU Alumni Gold/4-20/168-5.0 Emmanuel Rotich, Tulane/SR/AAC Championships/5-10/14:08.87 4×400 Relay Da’Quan Bellard, LSU/SR/Texas Relays/3-27/52-5.25 Faith Estelle, Southern/SR/SWAC Championships/5-3/185-4.0 Tommy Nedow, Southeastern/SO/SLC Championships/5-3/54-2.0 Alicia Stamey, LSU/10-26/21:12.6 Runner of the Year: Jaron Flournoy – LSU – Sr., Detroit Michigan Nominees were supplied and voted on by school track contacts whocould not vote for athletes from their schools. Damion Thomas, LSU/SO/SEC Championships/5-9/13.57 Coach of the Year: Dennis Shaver – LSU Rhea Thompson, LA Tech/JR/Bulldog Relays/3-22/46-10.75 400 Hurdles Eric Coston, LSU/SO/LSU Invitational/4-27/1:52.09 Runner of the Year: Emmanuel Rotich, Tulane – Sr., Sotik, Republic of Kenya Bossier Parish Community College’s Kent Falting has been named the Coach of the Year on the Louisiana Sports Writers Association’s All-Louisiana cross country team. Cross Country Special Honors Katy-Ann McDonald, LSU/FR/LSU Invitational/4-27/4:31.02 SUNO – Bolton, Smikle, Peart, Williams/NAIA Championships/5-25/3:38.22 Tulane – Harewood, Mitchell, Jones, Loyd/Southern Miss Open/4-27/3:41.59 Rebekah Markel, Tulane/SR/AAC Championships/5-10/14-1.75 JuVaughn Harrison, LSU/SO/NCAA Championships/6-7/7-5.25 Jaron Flournoy, LSU/SR/SEC Championships/5-9/10.12 Julia Palin, LSU/FR/LSU Alumni Gold/4-20/17:02.47 Pole Vault LSU – Vincent, Hislop, Mosby, Flournoy/NCAA Championships/6-5/38.37 Ersula Farrow, LSU/10-13/21:41.4 Grace McKenzie, McNeese/JR/Texas Relays/3-27/19-11.5 The men’s and women’s track teams were compiled based on the top qualifying times, distances andheights list posted by the United States Track and Field and Cross CountryCoaches Association. Rhea Thompson, LA Tech/JR/Johnson NSU Invitational/4-12/161-7.0 Larkins was credited with a10.10 in the 100. LSU’s Kary Vincent (10.07) and Jaron Flournoy (10.12) werethe other two selections in the 100. Runner, Freshman of the Year: Sha’Carri Richardson – LSU – Fr., Dallas, Texas Discus Kiya Oviosun, LSU/FR/NCAA East Prelims/5-24/53.06 Chandler Mixon, UL-Lafayette/SO/SBC Championships/5-10/6727 Lauren Clarke, Northwestern State/FR/Johnson NSU Invitational/4-12/41-9.25 Cross Country Best Times Cole Courtois, LA Tech/SO/CUSA Championships/5-9/17-3.0 Danielle Lorenz, UNO/JR/SLC Championships/5-3/49-1.5 Elias Keter, UL-Monroe/SR/Southern Miss Open/4-27/8:59.02 Field Athlete of the Year: Jasmyn Steels – Northwestern State – Jr., College Station, Texas 100 Meters Stacey Ann Williams, SUNO/FR/NAIA Championships/5-25/52.60 Hammer Alanna Arvie, McNeese/JR/Texas State Invitational/3-28/194-0.0 Shot Put Miguel Barrera-Lopez, McNeese/JR/SLC Championships/5-3/31:57.54 Mercy Abire, LSU/JR/Hurricane Invitational/4-13/42-0.5 Milan Young, LSU/SO/LSU Invitational/4-27/13.12 100 Hurdles Newcomer of the Year: Tyler Terry – LSU – Jr., Carrollton, Georgia Dorian Camel, LSU/FR/LSU Invitational/4-27/46.40 BPCC qualified for the NJCAA Division I meet, becoming firstBossier Parish team to participate in a national event since 1997. Nicholas Scott, Southern/FR/SWAC Championships/5-3/1:52.44 Malik Burns, Southeastern/JR/Florida Relays/3-28/54-1.0 Kristian Jackson, Southeastern/FR/Cole-Lancon Challenge/4-13/150-10.0 Damon Guidry, UL-Lafayette/JR/McNeese Springtime/4-6/7-0.5 10000 Meters Track and Field Special Honors Andre Girouard, LSU/JR/La. Classics/3-15/213-8.0 Coach of the Year: Dennis Shaver – LSU Long Jump Hollie Parker, LSU/SR/Miami Alumni/4-12/2:09.00 Freshman of the Year: Evans Kipchumba, Tulane – Fr., Eldoret, Kenya Grace McKenzie, McNeese/JR/Texas Relays/3-27/5609 Christian Miller, LSU/JR/SEC Championships/5-9/53-0.25 Louisiana Sports Writers Association and Staff Reports Alicia Stamey, LSU/SO/LSU Alumni Gold/4-20/11:17.24 Kary Vincent, LSU/SO/LSU Invitational/4-27/10.07 Harrison Martingayle, LSU/10-26/24:07.8 Adam Wise, LSU/10-26/24:35.8 Evans Kipchumba, Tulane/9-22/24:49.3 Micah Dye, UL-Monroe/SR/Southern Miss Open/4-27/160-4.0 Eric Coston, LSU/10-26/25:05.3 Hannah Bourque, LSU/10-26/21:02.6 Juliette Smith, UL-Lafayette/JR/SBC Championships/5-10/5072 3000 Steeplechase WOMEN (6K) Women Jasmyn Steels, Northwestern State/JR/NCAA Championships/6-6/22-0.25 High Jump LSU – Misher, Young, Woodward, Humphrey/NCAA East Prelims/5-26/3:33.84 Pole Vault Brittley Humphrey, LSU/JR/NCAA East Prelims/5-25/13.04 All-Louisiana Track and Field Best Times Northwestern State senior Micah Larkins, a former Haughton star who recently signed a professional contract, made the All-Louisiana Track and Field team in the 100-meter dash. Javelin Raymond Kibet, LSU/JR/NCAA East Prelims/5-24/46.49 Women Men Milan Young, LSU/SO/NCAA East Prelims/5-25/56.42 Coach of the Year: Yhann Plummer, XavierPerfect-Dating.comAre You Ready to Meet Cool Guys in Tung Chung?Perfect-Dating.com|SponsoredSponsoredUndoTheTopFiveVPNThe Secret Netflix Doesn’t Want You To Know To Unblock RestrictionsTheTopFiveVPN|SponsoredSponsoredUndoAspireAbove.comRemember Abby from NCIS? Take A Deep Breath Before You See How She Looks NowAspireAbove.com|SponsoredSponsoredUndoNews gadgetThis watch takes the whole country by storm! it’s price? Ridiculous!News gadget|SponsoredSponsoredUndoTheTopFiveVPNThe Trick Netflix Doesn’t Want You To Know To Unlock RestrictionsTheTopFiveVPN|SponsoredSponsoredUndoCelebsland.com9 Celebrity Before-And-After Plastic Surgery DisastersCelebsland.com|SponsoredSponsoredUndolast_img read more

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