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45 Riders Will Contest the 11th Annual Mongol Derby

first_imgThere are crazy things to do – and then there’s the Mongol Derby. Featured in the Guinness Book of Records as the world’s longest and toughest horse race, this is the 11th year that 45 men and women from the four corners of the earth will race 1,000km across Mongolia on semi-wild horses, next month.They range from a 56-year-old Texan cowboy to a helicopter pilot from Alice Springs, a paleo-botanist from The Netherlands and a management consultant from South Africa, via a host of saddle-hardened (they’ll need to be) girls and boys from the racing world. All think they are fearless and ready for the most extreme adventure of their lives – we’ll see… Some will crash and burn.2019 MONGOL DERBY DETAILSAugust 4-6: Pre-race trainingAugust 7: Start gun of the 2019 Mongol DerbyAugust 16: Final riders expected to finish2019 MONGOL DERBY COMPETITORSAUSTRALIASam Chisholm, 31, Alice SpringsSam is a helicopter pilot who grew up riding horses on a cattle station in the Northern Territory. Sam has ridden a motorcycle from Argentina to Alaska and did the Mongol Rally in 2015 with two mates. He’s “on a mission to finish the race and locate the car they blew up on the Steppe in 2015.”Justine Hales, 43, MelbourneA Kiwi in Oz who has ridden her whole life, Justine has worked in horse racing for 23 years and been associated with some brilliant horses during that time. She works for Ciaron Maher Racing currently. “I am looking forward to the challenge of the Derby, but I have big boots to fill after Annabel Neasham and Adrian Corboy’s win last year.” She is raising funds for the Peter Mac Foundation for cancer research.Sally Conway, 22, Taroom, QueenslandSally grew up riding horses and working on her family cattle farm. She has always had a passion for riding and adventure, but over the past five years, Sally has been exposed to the consequences of unrecognised mental illness and has developed a burning desire to do something to improve the mental health and mental awareness of Australians, particularly those living in rural and remote areas. She therefore saw the Mongolian Derby as her chance to take a stance. She has never competed in an endurance race and knows she won’t be the best rider on the steppe. But, “I know why I am riding, and who I am riding for; I think this will give me the strength I need.”Jesse Byrne, 36, Bunbury, Western AustraliaJesse’s father was a racehorse trainer and he has been working in the racing industry, riding work and breaking-in lots of young racehorses since he left high school. He isn’t here for the beer – he says he is “hoping to be one of the first competitors to cross the line.”Lucinda Kyle, 29, QueenslandWhen she was 15, Lucinda bought an ex-racehorse and a saddle. “I ate dirt a lot,” she admits. After school she spent four years travelling in North America and Australia, working with racehorses at the track and on studs. She has spent the past five years on cattle stations in Western and Central Queensland as a ringer, and breaking-in and training her own/station horses to compete in campdrafting. “Riding in the Derby would be the adventure of a lifetime, a true proving ground doing what I love amongst a rich culture that would be a privilege to explore.” She is riding to raise awareness of ovarian cancer, “a silent disease that a close friend is battling.”Sarah Brown, 34, Western AustraliaSarah has had a strong passion for horses from a young age, she spent her teenage years competing and working in many equestrian disciplines. She has looked after and ridden thoroughbred racehorses the world over. Now farm manager at Amelia Park farm in WA, she has taken on the task of the Mongol Derby as a challenge to herself. When Sarah is not working at the farm or training for the Derby she loves nothing more than spending time with her dog Bronson and sinking bush chooks (We have no idea what this means…).DUBAIPip Chisholm, 43 (originally from Australia)Pip loves horses, travel, nature, adventure and challenging herself. The Derby feeds all her passions and she is excited to go to Mongolia. She is Australian but lives in Dubai, learning the ropes of endurance riding.GERMANYRendel Rieckmann, 31, MunichRendel is interested in “exploring different cultures and testing the limits of the physical exploration combined with great horses.” After three years of flirting with participating in the Mongol Derby, the first move was done late 2018 and wedding will be in August 2020. “Let’s see if the 20 years of horse riding experiences on all sorts of continents and mainly dressage and showjumping are enough for a happy ending,” he says.Jacqueline Knöpfel, 33Jacqueline has been riding since she was five years old, and has trained in many aspects of horse care and equitation. For almost a year she worked in Iceland and led riding tours, and also trained horses there. “I love travelling with my horses, and have already spent more than 1,000km in the saddle at a time. The last occasion was in 2016, when I rode from Switzerland to East Germany.”HUNGARYZsófi Homor, 22Zsófi has been riding since she was four. She left the mother country a couple years ago and started riding all over Europe, trying different disciplines and experiencing different cultures. After being an exercise rider in Ireland and a guide in Iceland, she decided to combine her two passions and ride fast but small horses. The Derby seemed like a good opportunity to do so.ITALYNaomi Crombeen, 27, Castiglion Fiorentino (originally from Belgium)Originally from Belgium, Naomi is currently living in Italy where she runs a farm and breeds Haflinger horses. She says: “I’ve always been super-fascinated by the Mongolian culture and their horses”, and is also hoping that passing some time in the middle of some other crazy fellow Derby riders will make her feel less out of place than usual.THE NETHERLANDSMargreet Voermans, 43Margreet started riding when she was four years old and competed in dressage and jumping until she went to university. Eight years ago she moved to Colombia and started to play polo over there. This year she is back in The Netherlands and is training on endurance horses for the Derby.Aly van der Meulen, 27, BlijaFor the past few years Aly has travelled the world working with horses, mostly as a trail guide in South Africa, the USA and Iceland. She has her own horse travel agency offering rides all over the world, which she loves trying out. “The Derby seemed like the ultimate challenge for someone who loves trail-riding and exploring new cultures on horseback. And a good reason to get in shape!”Linda van Gorkum, 29Linda describes herself as “just an ordinary girl living an extraordinary life, always looking for new adventures, doing the unexpected and stretching comfort zones.” She has loved horses all her life and her recent interest in endurance riding and other sports makes competing in the Mongol Derby a perfect fit.Esther Leenen, 38, SomerenSolo backpacker who has travelled all of the world’s continents. Esther had her first riding lesson when she was nine years old, did dressage and showjumping during her teenage years and switched to endurance in 1998. Besides endurance riding she organises several multi-day endurance events. She also worked in tourism for many years and graduated as a Geography teacher. Is riding the Derby as a personal challenge and is “looking forward to meeting communities where WIFI and modern technology is not first priority”.Anne Binnendijk, 27, ‘s-HertogenboschAnne is riding in the Derby “to seek limits, go on an adventure, see what the world will bring and most importantly, do this on horseback!” Anne is also riding for Assistance Dogs worldwide, as they have their own Assistance Dog (who sadly has to stay at home, after research).Michael Field, 55 (originally from the UK)Mike has done competitive sports all his life. In his youth he competed at county and national level in cross-country running, and later on he played rugby in England, France and Germany. On retiring from rugby he went back to riding horses. He has hunted a lot in the UK and Ireland. Mike now lives in The Netherlands where he competes at low-level dressage, show jumping and eventing competitions with his horse. Mike works for the Faculty of Archeology in Leiden specialising in (paleo) Botany. In Mongolia Mike hopes to ride lots of nice horses and also to see some of the local flora. Mike is raising money for the Greyhound Trust. He is riding in the race for the challenge and is doing it this year before he gets too old.NEW ZEALANDElise Searancke-Stables, 19, WaikatoAppropriately for someone with her surname, Elise has worked with horses all her life, finding her passion in showjumping and racing. For Elise, the Derby is the ultimate adventure combining her love of horses with exploring new, wild places.SOUTH AFRICAJulia Conway, 27, Robertson (originally from Australia)Julia grew up in central Victoria, Australia and like most here, is lucky enough to have ridden her whole life. After school she joined the Royal Australian Navy for a gap year and then went on to study Podiatry. She now lives in South Africa with her partner and lives her dream of riding “from dawn til dusk”. Julia is riding to satisfy the adventurist within her, to see the country and meet the incredible Mongolian people and horses.Wiesman Nel, 40Born and raised on a family farm in Moolmanshoek, Wiesman grew up with horses, exploring wherever he could. As a student he spent his time doing ultra-marathons, adventure races and mountain runs but always longed to be back on a horse. He now competes in endurance riding at national level. He wants to “challenge his passion for extremes and horsemanship” and his mission is “to do this with some passion, some compassion, some humour and some style.”Sampie Mokoakoe, 42Sampie has worked at the Moolmanshoek Private Game Reserve for the past six years as a horse trainer, which includes conditioning of young horses. He assists in guiding the extreme horse trails that they host in Lesotho and the Wildcoast. He is passionate about running and does mountain runs and ultra-marathons as well as endurance riding.Vasin Govender, 51The idea of doing the Mongol Derby started a year ago while Vasin was having a tequila (or two) on an extreme trail ride in the Mountain Kingdom of Lesotho. Exploring the rugged and wild mountains of Lesotho on horseback over five days, climbing almost 9,000m was the ultimate rush. Relatively new to riding, five years ago he traded in his MTB’ng and dirt-biking hobbies for horses. He retired at 50 as a management consultant and just started a new financial venture, www.hardpear.com.SPAINMiguel Escalada Lopez-Ibor, 26, Madrid, SpainMiguel has been riding most of his life in different disciplines. Living in the concrete city, he always craved travelling long distances on horseback. He’s a firm believer that since the Adventurists are organising the Derby, “it will surely be lively, and definitely tough. What else would one need?” He fell for Mongolia while doing the Mongol Rally in 2015 and always wished to return to the steppe.SWEDENAnnette Kriller, 54 (originally from Germany)Annette has always wanted to travel on horseback and saw a perfect opportunity with the Mongol Derby. She participated in 2017 but didn’t finish, because she got bucked off and required radiographs after 850km, which gave her the perfect excuse to come back and try again. Loves to sit on a fast horse all day long and is really looking forward to going back to Mongolia with its splendid horses and friendly people.UKFrancis Delaey, 51, London, England (originally from Belgium)An equestrian at heart, Belgian-born Francis has been riding since childhood. For the past 15 years he has moved with his spirited Hanoverian mare from Moldova to Azerbaijan, Belarus and now the UK. Having recently retired his four-legged friend, he was in desperate need of a new equestrian adventure and “could not resist the calling of the Mongolian steppes”.Holly Rivett, 30, Ayr, ScotlandA sports and remedial massage therapist who has been passionate about horses from an early age, Holly has enjoyed training her own horses to compete in dressage and eventing, winning many rosettes and trophies along the way. She also trains in Taekwondo, currently working towards 2nd degree black belt, and feels that the strength and fitness elements of both taekwondo and horse riding are a great compliment for each other. She is eager to test her horsemanship and endurance skills on the Mongolian Steppe during her adventure this August.Alanna Watt, 24, Berkshire, EnglandAlanna breaks-in and exercises young racehorses at Ben de Haan Racing for high-profile trainers and the Hong Kong Jockey Club. “The Derby has been a dream of mine for many years; it a serious challenge of so many elements that I want to conquer. What attracts me most of all is the pure wilderness and freedom of people and horses. Magnificent,” she says.Katie Angus, 32, Oxfordshire, EnglandKatie currently works at a small trekking centre in the Cotswolds, so there couldn’t have been a better time to attempt the Derby as she has a stable yard for full of horses and ponies to train on! When Katie is not working she is out training and competing in triathlons and open-water swimming events, which is what inspired her passion for pushing herself to her limits. The Derby is “the ideal way to test my endurance limits and stubbornness, to never not finish a race, in the sport I love the most.”Ava Drake, 21, Essex, EnglandAva describes herself as “a determined, enthusiastic and outgoing young lady who watched a documentary of the Derby on Horse and Country TV as a little girl and made a promise to herself to give it a go one day.” She has been riding for as long as she can remember, and owns a beautiful thoroughbred mare who has certainly been put through her paces while training for the Derby. She will be riding with her friend Aly from Holland, and thinks together they will make a great team.USAMolly Pearson, 32, Oakland, CaliforniaMolly used to do handstands on horses in sparkly full body spandex. She’s never done endurance riding before, so she thought she’d take it up by tackling 630 Mongolian miles. She’s addicted to Burning Man, dark chocolate, and the great stories that come from failed Tinder dates.Katie Hasse, 29, Upperville, VirginiaKatie has evented to CCI3*-L competitor, and is a USDF silver medallist with an occasional foray in to the show hunter and foxhunting world. She recently took up endurance riding on her thoroughbred because no one told her that was a bad idea. She also typically has 10 rescue dogs living in her house.Linda Vegher, 40, Boston, MACreative director who was fortunately reminded last March on a picture perfect foxhunting day — four hours galloping like mad across all kinds of the most beautiful Virginia countryside — that this in fact is what feeds her soul. From then on, she made a personal pact to keep it up as long as she physically could, “the constant adrenaline rush on the back of a horse.” She grew up eventing, but really is a jack of all trades from steeplechase / flat track exercise-riding, foxhunting, jumpers, hunters, cutting, mounted archery, polo, etc. but has always loved travel and other sports especially if it involves embracing nature. The nomadic Mongolian culture, between the horses and the falconry, strikes a double personal cord being raised with a master falconer father, which usually involved some bird of prey sitting on the coffee table in the living room during her childhood.Benjamin Materna, 34, CaliforniaBen is an “established professional in the renewable energy field – currently managing Microgrid Deployment for Tesla.” He’s riding in the Derby “to explore the massive growth opportunity of the challenges it presents.” He adds, “I am also riding for all those who can’t.”Sam Franklin, 22, Mobile, AlabamaHaving grown up riding at summer camp, Sam developed a love for horses and adventure. The beginning of August 2019 marks two years since he was involved in an accident which resulted in a broken back. Sam decided what better way to celebrate a new chance at life than to ride 1000km across Mongolia!Frank Winters, 56, Gruver, TexasA modern-day cowboy by trade, long days in the saddle are routine, but that Mongolian saddle is not! He competed in the rodeo circuits long after he became a grandfather and sees the Mongol Derby as just another challenge to overcome. “What do you mean with why I’m running the Mongol Derby? It looks like fun!” For someone who was riding bucking horses in a rodeo at 53, it very well may be. He has never held a job that didn’t involve horses. His kids, grandkids, friends and neighbors will be cheering him on and preparing for his inevitable hospital stay.Erin Nagle, 26, CaliforniaGraphic Designer by day, extreme athlete by night, Erin has been riding every horse she can get her hands on for as long as she can remember. She has given most disciplines a shot but has found her current sweet spot in polo. Each year she takes on a new physical challenge — last year was body-building, this year, the Derby. It will be an excellent test of her horsemanship and character, the ultimate adventure. If nothing else, her ruthless determination will get her across the finish line.Kelsey Eliot, 26, Dryden, NYKelsey has been trail-riding since she was eight, has guided riding tours in Iceland, took up arena polo three years ago, and recently began endurance. She is a firm believer that “life begins at the edge of your comfort zone.”Patti Long, 44, Dade City, FloridaPatti grew up on a cattle ranch in Florida and is an accomplished multi-discipline rider. She has been foxhunting for the majority of her life and she has served as a whipper-in for the Two Rivers Hounds and is currently whipping-in for the South Creek Foxhounds. She is an equine reproductive technologist. Patti will be riding for Moffitt Cancer Center Foundation.Abbi Bell, 29Abbi is another who has been riding horses since she was a small child. “As is often the case, I was assumed to be going through a ‘phase’ that ultimately developed into a lifetime passion.” She comes from a background of mixed-discipline training, has experience in breeding sport horses and is always committed to furthering her riding and education of the equine industry.Taggert VinZant, 24“I’ve spent the majority of my life following the directions that I was pulled in by other people,” admits Taggert. “This past year I’ve reclaimed my own direction in life and started chasing new adventures.” He has been riding as long as he has been walking, and hasn’t been far from a horse’s back since he was three years old. From barrel-racing as a child to eventing as a teenager and then exercising racehorses as an adult, Taggert’s life has been filled with time in the saddle. As a young adult, he moved to Aiken, South Carolina, to train with a 4* event rider. From there he started his own sport horse training operation and also started riding at the track. At his peak, he was sitting on 14 horses each day, starting before the sun rose and finishing after it set. Now, while he rides primarily for pleasure, his day job continues to put him on farms as an equestrian-focused filmmaker. Last August he spent two weeks in the deserts of Nevada helping build the city that is Burning Man. “I even battled other burners in the gladiator-style Thunderdome of Black Rock City. I want to continue choosing adventure for my life; this feels like my next chapter.”Ella Mildon, 23After spending 10 years in the eventing world and sitting on countless types of horses – from rescues, to ponies, to imported warmbloods – Ella is looking for an opportunity to travel and further expand her equine experiences! For the past few years she has been self-employed, specialising in rescues and focusing on her own personal goals.Robert Long, 70The oldest competitor in this year’s Mongol Derby, Robert says that horses have driven his entire life. He started on ponies, and then broncs his dad bought him to train and sell. These revenues helped him fund university tuitions and expenses. He matriculated to riding and training mules for packing and hunting, and worked with young Appaloosas for sporting show. He currently helps young Quarter Horses to be versatile ranch and competitive cow horses. “I have gained an innate ability to select and partner with a horse, thus forming a team worthy of the challenge,” he says. He is riding “to accept the challenge of selecting and managing a good horse across a historical, storied and difficult landscape. To interact with the legendary and best horsemen of all time. To test my skill, my nerve and my mental fortitude. To experience and compete in the ultimate horse event that will exceed all my past experiences. And I’d hate to think I can’t….”Catherine Kennedy, 30Catherine is a dual citizen of the United States and the United Kingdom and has been riding horses since she was five. While she currently competes in eventing, Catherine also has experience in reining, cutting, western pleasure and hunter/jumpers. Catherine has been dreaming of the Derby for years and can’t wait to explore Mongolia.Rachel Roman, 27Rachel is an “adventure-seeking, nature-loving athlete-in-training” based in the Pacific Northwest. She grew up on the Eastern Shore of Maryland and has spent her whole life on or around horses. What started with a pony in the backyard turned into a lifelong passion for equestrian work – no matter the place, she has always found a way to connect with the broader equine community.When not in riding boots, Rachel spends the majority of her time outdoors. She got her first taste of true wilderness during a National Outdoor Leadership (NOLS) course, spending three months in the Southwestern US climbing mountains, rafting rivers and going 22 days without a shower. But these days she is just trying to find ways to fit in adventures amidst an average 9-5 “adult” life. This race is an opportunity to combine two of her biggest passions in life and find out if she still has that adventurist spirit that can keep her smiling through the longest and toughest horse race in the world. Tags: Mongol Derby, We’ll send you our regular newsletter and include you in our monthly giveaways. PLUS, you’ll receive our exclusive Rider Fitness digital edition with 15 exercises for more effective riding. Subscribe to the Horse Sport newsletter and get an exclusive bonus digital edition! More from Horse Sport:Christilot Boylen Retires From Team SportAfter an exemplary career as one of Canada’s top Dressage riders, seven-time Olympian Christilot Boylen has announced her retirement from team competition.2020 Royal Agricultural Winter Fair CancelledFor only the second time in its history, The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair has been cancelled but plans are being made for some virtual competitions.Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Statement on 2020 EventAs the Province of Ontario starts to reopen, The Royal’s Board and staff will adhere to all recommendations put forward by government and health officials.Government Financial Assistance for Ontario FarmersOntario Equestrian has recently released this update of several financial assistance packages available, including those for farm business. Email* SIGN UP Horse Sport Enewslast_img read more

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OK Ambulance District Credit Card Used for Illegal, Questionable Expenditures

first_imgAmong the items found to have been purchased by the ambulance district credit card were jewelry, baseball-related items, and phone accessories from Amazon. These items were delivered to the home address of Scott Augustine, the district’s administrator at the time. Augustine, who has since been relieved of his position, did not respond to requests for comment. However, he remains employed by the district as an emergency medical technician. Auditors also criticized the district for incurring debt by taking out three loans and having a negative $57,362 cash balance at the end of fiscal year 2018, the end of the audit period; those actions violated state law and the Oklahoma Constitution, according to auditors. According to a report from The Oklahoman, a state audit conducted by State Auditor & Inspector Cindy Byrd’s office revealed that the Greer County (OK) Special Ambulance District (GCSAD) made several questionable credit card and cell phone purchases and also took part in illegal deficit spending. The GCSAD serves Mangum and the surrounding communities.center_img Auditors also questioned more than $2,600 in cell phone purchase orders, stating that the documentation on the cell phone statements indicated the unauthorized cellphone charges and phone equipment charges resulted from usage of family members of the administrator. A copy of the audit was emailed Monday morning to the offices of Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter and to the Greer County District Attorney’s Office for possible legal action.last_img read more

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UWF men’s golf heads to George Mason for Patriot Intercollegiate

first_img Share UWF men’s golf heads to George Mason for Patriot Intercollegiate West Florida looks to continue early season success in Virginia September 25, 2015 PENSACOLA, Fla. – The University of West Florida men’s golf team returns to action on Sunday when the team partakes in the Patriot Intercollegiate hosted by George Mason University. West Florida heads into the tournament after a first place finish at the Jay Jennison Memorial earlier this week. Sophomore Henry Westmoreland (Wacissa, Fla./Florida State University School) took home first place overall, while sophomore Chandler Blanchet (Gainesville, Fla./Buchholz HS), junior Esteban Castro (Bogota, Colombia/IMG Academy), and freshman Bryce Geraghty (Gulf Breeze, Fla./Gulf Breeze HS) had top-12 finishes as well.”Coming into this week, we are looking to build on the confidence we gained from last week” said Head Coach Steve Fell. “Being the only Division II team in a Division I field is a different challenge but the way we prepare and go about things doesn’t change from tournament to tournament. If we play like we are capable of we should have a good chance to win.” This marks the first time UWF will participate in the Patriot Intercollegiate. 17 teams make up the field, with West Florida being one of four non-Division I teams. The other 16 teams participating in this year’s Patriot Intercollegiate include George Mason, Bethune-Cookman, Binghamton, Delaware, Eastern Kentucky, Fairleigh Dickinson, High Point, James Madison, La Salle, Longwood, Marshall, McDaniel College, Navy, Saint Joseph’s, Towson, and Villanova. Live stats will be available through Golfstat.com. For information on all UWF athletics, visit www.GoArgos.com. #ARGOS#Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

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Extraordinary Evidence

first_imgA Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… richard macmanus Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Tags:#web center_img Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… It’s Day 8 and my word count is 14,778. Here’s the latest. I took yesterday off. Have got a bit of flu, but the show must go on. I’m trying not to take my novel too seriously, having a bit of fun with it. Today I came up with the concept of “space blogs”. Heh.Extraordinary Evidence is now the working title of my novel. I will probably change it later, because it’s been used quite often. It comes from the late great Carl Sagan. I read his novel Contact in the early 90’s I think and obviously it is an inspiration for my current project. As Mr Sagan said in this interview: “…Precisely because of human fallibility, extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence.”last_img read more

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Life Is Like a Circle: Part Three

first_imgIn part one of this series, we talked about organizing the harassment investigation based on the complaint, the individual who made the outcry, and company policy. We also addressed the order in which interviews should be conducted and the importance of a complete and thorough conversation with the complainant. This is a time for the complainant to do the majority of the talking, while the interviewer spends most of his time listening for facts, biases, and assumptions. Once the complete story has been related, it is only then that the interviewer uses probing questions to enhance the level of details of the story.In part two of the series, we addressed the confidentiality of the investigation, its timeliness, and the preservation of evidence. Then we went on to discuss the strategy and preparation to begin the interviews with the victim, witnesses, and alleged harasser.In this article, we will focus on the actual interview process and how it differs between the parties involved. The interviews themselves help the investigator establish the facts, potential witnesses, and evidence that may corroborate the different parties’ statements.- Sponsor – The ComplainantThe first interview to be conducted is a thorough conversation with the complainant. The complainant may or may not be the victim—it could also be another individual who heard the victim’s outcry. Victims, for any number of reasons, may be reluctant to make a complaint against another employee or a supervisor. However, once the complaint has been made, it must be investigated in a timely manner. If the individual who heard the victim’s outcry comes forward, he or she should be carefully debriefed in great detail not only focusing on the statements made by the victim but also examining the victim’s demeanor and relevant facts concerning the work environment. This interview generally begins with rapport building between the interviewer and subject before asking the open-ended question, “Tell me in as much detail as you can, what happened?”This interview should also ultimately provide a context for the investigation relating to the personalities and general environment of the workplace. Without a context for the event, the investigator in future interviews may not ask the right questions or may make erroneous assumptions about day-to-day events.If the complainant is the victim, the interviewer should start after establishing rapport with an open-ended question that directly addresses the individual’s complaint. This may be an emotional time for the victim as they struggle with anger, shame, uncertainty, or any other number of emotions. The interviewer needs to be supportive, and one of the best ways to do this is to be a good, nonjudgmental, empathetic listener. Open-ended questions let the victim relive the event in their own words without contamination by the questions, biases, or assumptions that the investigator may have made or had.The Cognitive InterviewOften the victims may have suffered a pattern of harassment, which will require the interviewer to break the interview into portions that can address each of the incidents in the pattern. One of the best ways to address this type of interview is to use a cognitive interview, which encourages the victim or witness to provide a detailed account of each event.The cognitive interview starts out with rapport building and then moves on to instructing the witness or victim on what is expected of them in the conversation. Generally, the interviewer will ask the individual to be as detailed as possible in their recollection of events reporting even the smallest details. They could also be told to step into their memory remembering things that they saw, heard, felt as they went through the experience. The interviewer will also let them know that they may be asked the same question more than one time. The witness or victim should understand that asking a question multiple times is not because the interviewer doesn’t believe them, but he simply wants to encourage them to go into more detail or clarify their previous statements.The interviewer then opens the interview with an open-ended question that encourages the subject to give a narrative answer: “Tell me in as much detail as possible, what happened from beginning to end?” The interviewer should just listen to this untainted narrative from beginning to end without interruption. Once the interviewer has the subject’s untainted story, he can divide the story into sections to develop details, facts, and evidence that may support or disprove the account.The interviewer now selects a portion of the story to begin further development, which is best done in a chronological order since this does not disrupt the memory but enhances recall. The interviewer asks the subject, for example, “Tell me in as much detail as possible what you saw, heard, and felt between meeting him in the hall and walking to the elevator?” The interviewer now carefully listens for additional information, facts, biases, or assumptions as the individual adds more detail to the story. As the interviewer listens to the retelling of this section, he may ask more open-ended questions to continually expand the person’s narrative. An open-ended question relating to some detail might sound like this: “Now you said he ‘seemed excited.’ Tell me more about that?” Notice that the interviewer did not add any information to the question but used a quote from the individual’s statement to ask for clarification and expansion.The interviewer continues to explore each subsequent section or incident of the victim’s story in the same way saving any closed-ended questions until the very end to avoid contaminating the person’s story. A closed-end question is asking for a specific piece of information: “When your boss said, ‘I’m going to ruin your career,’ was Janet in the room?” The closed-ended questions supplies a specific answer, not the important narrative the open-ended question achieves.Once the victim and witnesses have been interviewed, the investigator should examine each of the individual’s narratives against the evidence, context of the event, and statements for consistency. Research has shown that the Cognitive Interview helps the interviewer judge an individual’s truthfulness. The truthful individual’s story generally has a wealth of detail mixed with emotions. The story makes sense in its structure and has a logical portrayal of events. The deceptive story is much more likely to be bare-bones lacking in detail, illogical in nature, or told in a way that leads the interviewer away from pertinent events. At the end of the day, it will be the investigation that supports a particular individual or conclusion. There may be verifiable facts, supporting witnesses, or even in some situations recordings of the incident.The HarasserUsually the harasser will be the final person interviewed in the investigation. The interviewer has now had an opportunity to evaluate the victim’s and witnesses’ accounts and investigate and establish certain facts, and believes the investigation warrants an in-depth conversation with the alleged harasser.There obviously may be some variations based on whether the harasser is aware of the complaint or specific company policy or political issues to taking certain courses of action, but regardless the conversation with the alleged harasser should be a detailed inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the events.The Cognitive Interview is often an appropriate way to introduce the topics under investigation and obtain the alleged harasser’s explanations or view of the situation. Once the interviewer has a complete explanation of the situation from the alleged harasser, he can begin to use evidence or statements made from other parties that contradict the individual’s story. The interviewer obtains and carefully examines each of the subject’s responses to these contradictions locking down in detail each of his statements. The individual’s responses to the contradiction should be noted and placed within quotation marks in the interviewer’s notes and final report.Depending on company policy and the general investigative practices of the organization the deceptive subject may be confronted to obtain an admission to the allegation. The transition to an introductory statement, which discusses who the interviewer is and what he does, the types of cases investigated, and how investigations are conducted, makes a smooth transition to offering a showing of understanding of how people make errors in judgment. Using third-person stories, the interviewer offers the subject an opportunity to save face and admit his indiscretion without being subjected to ridicule. This conversational approach allows the interviewer an opportunity to understand the subject’s decision-making and feelings relating to the event. The interviewer, after obtaining the admissions to the incident, may take a witnessed written or recorded statement to document the individual’s statements.Unlike a traditional theft investigation where there may be video or solid documentation of the fraud, a harassment interview requires more detailed attention to victim and witness interviews to bring the case to a successful conclusion. Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

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IDC Predictions for the CIO 2015 Agenda

first_imgIDC has release their predictions for how they see the agenda will be changing the role of the CIO over the next five years, including a prediction that by 2020 nearly two-thirds of them will be out of a job.Michael Rosen, Adjunct Research Advisor with IDC, said that “the transformations brought about by the 3rd Platform are having significant effects on how the business uses IT, how IT is delivered, and how the IT organization is structured.”By 2015, 60 percent of CIOs will use DevOps.By 2016, 80 percent of CIOs will deliver new architectures to enable innovation and better decisions.By 2016, 80 percent will replace current IT assets with cloud platforms.By 2016, 70 percent of CEOs will have security as a top 3 priority.By 2016, 65 percent of global strategy will require IT as a service.By 2017, 80 percent of CIO time will revolve around analytics, security and new revenue streams via digital services.By 2017, 35 percent of vendor relationships revolving around third party platforms will fail.By 2018, 50 percent of CIOs will favor an open standards approach.By 2018, 30 percent of CIOs will have an analytics strategy.By 2020, 60 percent of CIOs in global organizations will be supplanted by the Chief Digital Officer (CDO)last_img read more

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How U.S. Policy Creates Barriers for Cloud Providers

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting joe brockmeier 1 Related Posts Tags:#Analysis#cloud As cloud storage competition heats up, providers in the United States may want to start lobbying for better data protection laws if they want to remain competitive. The current state of U.S. law, particularly the Patriot Act, has companies outside the U.S. understandably nervous about hosting data on American soil.The issue has come to the fore thanks to the “2012 National Trade Estimate Report on Foreign Trade Barriers (NTE)” report. Part of the report focuses on “barriers” to trade complaints that U.S. companies have “voiced concerns” that the Australian government is “sending negative messages about cloud computing services to potential Australian customers in both the public and private sectors, implying that hosting data overseas, including in the United States, by definition entails greater risk and unduly exposes consumers to their data being scrutinized by foreign governments.”The report goes on to claim this isn’t the case, but even Microsoft has said that it cannot provide guarantees against data being handed over to U.S. authorities.Furthermore, the report complains that the Australian Parliament is considering draft legislation that prohibits “the overseas storage of any Australian electronic health records.”Australians aren’t unique in worrying about the Patriot Act. The members of the European Union (EU) are also concerned and are trying to pass legislation that would override the current EU/U.S. Safe Harbor provisions. The possible remedies considered by the EU could result in major fines for companies in breach of the directive.Removing BarriersOrganizations outside the United States are understandably concerned about hosting their data in the U.S, and thus may not do as much business with U.S.-based companies. If the new European Data Protection Directive goes forward it might ease concerns. But it could mean stringent penalties for U.S.-based companies if they do comply with requests from law enforcement. And it could mean legal unpleasantness if they don’t comply with requests from U.S. law enforcement.To put it another way, the tension between U.S. laws and interests overseas puts U.S. companies between a rock and a hard place.None of this is helped by whining U.S. trade representatives complaining about “trade barriers” that are nothing more than prudent reactions to overreaching U.S. laws. What’s called for is a second look at U.S. law – and a repeal of the parts (if not all) of the Patriot Act that give foreign organizations (and U.S. citizens, for that matter) cause for concern.The other alternative is to cede business to companies outside the U.S.The flip side of all of this, of course, is a business opportunity for companies based outside the U.S. and for companies that provide “bring your own storage,” options like ownCloud or client-side encryption offerings like SpiderOak Blue.The real barrier to trade here is not from outside, it’s one the U.S. government has erected and that U.S.-based companies are likely to pay the price for.Image courtesy of Shutterstock.center_img 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…last_img read more

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Now On Tap Is The Latest Smart Upgrade For Google Now

first_imgWhat it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Related Posts Tags:#Google#Google I/O 2015#Google Now The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologycenter_img With Cortana expanding to iOS and Android, and Apple working on upgrades to its own personal assistant, Google Now can’t take anything for granted. At Google I/O in San Francisco today, we got a preview of Now on Tap, a new feature arriving with Android M.As the name suggests, it works with a tap-and-hold on the Home button. The clever part is that Google Now can scan whatever’s on screen—whether a chat conversation or a Web page—and bring up relevant information.See also: Here’s What’s New In Android MOne example shown on stage was a movie mentioned in an email: Now on Tap brought up reviews, information and a trailer with one push. In another example, tapping on a photo of Hugh Laurie on a website brought up background information about the actor.Now on Tap was also able to scan a thread inside a third-party chat app and create a reminder to pick up dry cleaning, because that’s what the conversation was about. Another demo showed a Skrillex song in Spotify (not a Google app of course); asking “what’s his real name?” brought up the correct answer.In short, it makes Google Now better able to identify key items of interest within apps, parse natural language and prompts, and then take action on them. This is on top of other recent improvements to Google’s digital assistant: it now works with third-party apps and is expanding its reach into more areas.“Too often, you have to leave what you’re doing just to look for what you need somewhere else on your phone,” explains the official blog post. “With Now on Tap, you can simply tap and hold the home button for assistance without having to leave what you’re doing — whether you’re in an app or on a website.” No effort is needed on the part of developers provided their apps are indexed by Google.Aparna Chennapragada, Google Now’s product director, emphasized the three pillars of Google Now: Context, Answers and Actions. It’s clear that in the digital assistant race, Google is keen to stay ahead of the competition. Now on Tap is going to arrive with Android M in the third quarter of 2015.Screenshots of Google I/O taken by ReadWrite Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces david nieldlast_img read more

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Trial against juvenile today as HC denies early hearing on his minor

first_imgSrinagar: The trail against a juvenile accused in the horrific rape-and-murder case of an eight-year-old nomadic girl at Kathua last year will begin on Monday as the Jammu and Kashmir High Court refused to entertain a plea for an early hearing of a petition challenging his status as a minor, officials said.The trial will now begin before the Juvenile Justice Board at Kathuua in the Jammu region. The Juvenile Justice Board had initiated the trial on July 15, but the crime branch said it was not ready to proceed as the status of the accused as a minor was yet to be decided. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’The crime branch said that the police had approached the High Court challenging an order of the chief judicial magistrate last year in which the accused had been declared as a juvenile. Hearing the petition, Justice Dhiraj Singh Thakur said, “No case for preponement is made out. Let the matter be considered on its due date.” The matter is listed for August 5. The crime branch had approached the High Court praying for an early hearing as the Juvenile Justice Board had started proceedings after “framing memorandum of allegation” (framing of charges) on July 8 against the “delinquent juvenile”. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&KThe Board had directed the crime branch prosecution to present its evidence in the case. “If further proceedings in the matter before Juvenile Justice Board are not stayed at this stage, the revision petition will render infructuous defeating the very basic question of determination of juvenility of the delinquent accused,” the crime branch petition said. On July 15, the special public prosecutor had informed the Board that the High Court was yet to pass its verdict on the crime branch’s plea against the decision of a Kathua court which accepted the claim of the accused that he is a minor. The crime branch also annexed a report of the medical board of the Government Medical College, Jammu, which said the accused was “not less than 19 and not more than 21” years of age. The Board, however, after hearing the special public prosecutor, had given two weeks’ time to present the evidence as there was no stay by the high court on holding of trial. The main trial in the case was shifted to the Pathankot Sessions Court on the directions of the Supreme Court last year. The Pathankot Sessions Court had on June 10 this year sentenced Sanji Ram, dismissed special police officer Deepak Khajuria and Parvesh Kumar to life imprisonment. It also handed five-year sentences to three police officers.last_img read more

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Vigil on Parliament Hill marks 11 years of Sisters in Spirit movement

first_imgAnnette FrancisAPTN National NewsMore than 200 people gathered on Parliament Hill to honour Indigenous women who have either been murdered or have gone missing.Tuesday also marks the 11th anniversary of the vigil which is now held across the country.Under a clear blue sky, those gathered paid tribute to Inuit artist Annie Pootoogook.See more stories on SIS and Missing and Murdered Indigenous women here: #[email protected]last_img

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