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LETTER: Thank you for preserving the Jersey City middle school sports…

first_imgCommunityJersey City Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter TAGSjersey city board of educationletters to the editorproject a-team SHARE By John Heinis – October 19, 2019 12:27 pm 0 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Twitter Community CarePoint Health reaches deal for Cigna Health Insurance to join their network Bayonne In a letter to the editor, Jersey City teacher and coach Melissa Bengen expresses her gratitude for public school officials doing their part to preserve middle school sports.Dear Editor,I am a Jersey City Public School teacher and coach. Over the last 3 years or so I have been vocal at public board meetings about the back and forth threat of not funding our middle school sports program, Project-A-Team.My last 3 seasons as a coach have been disrupted by budget threats that have postponed and almost canceled entire seasons. The inconsistency is detrimental to our kids.Organized, competitive sports programs are essential parts of a school community and are building blocks for school pride and camaraderie amongst students.Students who struggle academically usually excel in other areas such as the arts or sports. Opportunities to shine in school should not be taken away from our kids due to funding.Teachers that coach students build strong relationships that spill over into the classroom-where it matters most.I would like to thank our superintendent Mr. Walker, and current board members for their commitment to saving the athletic programs, especially Project-A-Team.Sincerely,Melissa Bengen LETTER: Thank you for preserving the Jersey City middle school sports program Previous articleIn Hoboken’s 2nd Ward, Martinez-Debenedetto reveals open space waterfront planNext articleNJCU-run Jersey City special needs school plans to expand facility 50% by end of 2019 John Heinis Hoboken man killed in motorcycle crash on N.J. Turnpike in Kearny, state police say Bayonne Bayonne 2-alarm fire leaves six people displaced, one suffers minor injuries, fire chief sayslast_img read more

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Bayonne BOE prepared to utilize online classes in the event of…

first_img TAGSBayonne Board of Educationclass dojocoronavirusgoogle classroomjohn niesz SHARE Bayonne BOE prepared to utilize online classes in the event of coronavirus outbreak Bayonne man pepper sprayed, arrested after punching cop in the face, authorities say By John Heinis – March 10, 2020 5:07 pm 0 Bayonne BayonneEducation Facebook Twitter Previous articleVia CEO: Jersey City’s new public bus service has ‘fastest growing launch’ in the countryNext articleSecaucus woman gets nearly 6 years for enslaving Sri Lankan national for 9 years John Heinis RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR CarePoint Health reaches deal for Cigna Health Insurance to join their network Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Bayonne The Bayonne Board of Education is prepared to utilize online classes in the event of a coronavirus outbreak, according to a letter from Superintendent of Schools John Niesz. By John Heinis/Hudson County View“We are prepared and ready for a quick and immediate response should the Department of Health require our schools to close in the event of a COVID-19 outbreak in our community. There is no such notification at this time,” Niesz wrote in a letter addressed to the Bayonne community today.“However, we would like our community to know we are prepared and every day we are monitoring the current COVID-19 situation …The Bayonne School District will utilize an online learning platform of Google Classroom or ClassDojo. We will be sending access instructions this week should it be necessary.”He reiterated that this was all part of a proactive readiness plan, which includes using an EPA registered disinfectant for all “touch point areas” of the schools, a hydrogen peroxide-based surface cleaner for “heavily soiled and greasy surfaces,” as well as sprayers and pressurized cleaning guns to disinfect certain areas.Niesz also noted that a claim made by a student who came to school with a facemask on, claiming that he was in a location where a family member contracted COVID-19, had been proven to be false.Additionally, they will be following the same protocols as the Jersey City Public Schools for a student that comes to school wearing a facemask: they will assumed to be ill and sent home.The JCPS are holding a half-day for students tomorrow so that staff can further discuss coronavirus preventative measures and the Hudson County Schools of Technology will do something similar on Thursday. Bayonne Bayonne man busted with cocaine, heroin, semi-automatic handgun after fleeing from copslast_img read more

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Coronavirus updates: France to require masks in offices following ‘upsurge’ in cases

first_imgOvidiu Dugulan/iStockBy MORGAN WINSOR, ABC News(NEW YORK) — A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 781,000 people worldwide.Over 22 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some national governments are hiding or downplaying the scope of their outbreaks. Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than 5.4 million diagnosed cases and at least 171,823 deaths. Here’s how the news is developing Wednesday. All times Eastern:7:15 a.m.: Pope warns against vaccine priority for the richPope Francis said Wednesday that a COVID-19 vaccine should be “for everyone” and not made a priority for the rich.“How sad it would be if for the COVID-19 vaccine priority is given to the richest,” Francis said during his weekly general audience at the Vatican, which was held virtually due to the coronavirus pandemic.“It would be sad,” he added, “if the vaccine became property of such and such nation and not universal for everyone.”The pope noted how COVID-19 “has uncovered the plight of the poor and the great inequality that reigns in the world.”“The pandemic is a crisis. You don’t come out of it the same — either better or worse,” he said. “We must come out better.”6:34 a.m.: India records 1,092 more deathsIndia’s health ministry recorded 1,092 additional coronavirus-related deaths in the past 24 hours, bringing the nationwide toll to 52,889.The latest single-day rise in fatalities is lower than India’s record of 2,003 deaths reported on June 16.The country of 1.3 billion people has the world’s fourth-highest death toll from COVID-19, behind the United States, Brazil and Mexico, according to a real-time tally kept by Johns Hopkins University.More than 2.7 million people in India have been diagnosed with COVID-19 since the pandemic began — the third-highest count in the world.5:39 a.m.: ‘We are not seeing a surge in community cases,’ says New Zealand PMNew Zealand reported six new cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday, five of which were locally transmitted and are linked to a cluster of cases in the country’s most populous city.The national total now stands at 1,299 cases, 96 of which are active, according to data published on the health ministry’s website.New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said the latest figures were “encouraging.”“At this stage, we are not seeing a surge in community cases,” Ardern said at a press conference Wednesday. “We have not seen any new cases outside of that identified Auckland cluster.”Health officials are still investigating how the outbreak in Auckland started after the country went 102 days without any local transmission. The new cluster of cases was discovered there last week, prompting authorities to impose a two-week lockdown in the region and to reschedule national elections.4:45 a.m.: France will require face masks in offices starting next monthFrance’s labor ministry announced Tuesday that face masks will be required in enclosed shared office spaces starting Sept. 1, citing an “upsurge” in COVID-19 cases.Mask will not be mandatory in individual offices so long as only one person is present, the ministry said.The wearing of face masks is already compulsory in public indoor spaces across France. Several cities, including Paris and Marseille, have imposed mask requirements in some outdoor areas, such as popular beaches.There were 2,238 new cases of COVID-19 identified in France on Tuesday, according to the health ministry, which is requiring on-the-spot tests for travelers coming from over a dozen nations with active virus circulation, including the United States. 3:50 a.m.: US reports more than 1,300 new deaths in a single dayThere were 44,813 new cases of COVID-19 identified in the United States on Tuesday, according to a count kept by Johns Hopkins University.Tuesday’s tally is well below the country’s record set on July 16, when 77,255 new cases were identified in a 24-hour reporting period.An additional 1,324 coronavirus-related deaths were also recorded Tuesday — a nearly threefold increase from the previous day but still under the record 2,666 new deaths that were reported on April 17.A total of 5,482,602 people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with COVID-19 since the pandemic began, and at least 171,823 of them have died, according to Johns Hopkins. The cases include people from all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C. and other U.S. territories as well as repatriated citizens.By May 20, all U.S. states had begun lifting stay-at-home orders and other restrictions put in place to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus. The day-to-day increase in the country’s cases then hovered around 20,000 for a couple of weeks before shooting back up and crossing 70,000 for the first time in mid-July.While week-over-week comparisons show that the nationwide number of new cases has continued to decrease in recent weeks, the number of new deaths has increased, according to an internal memo from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, obtained by ABC News on Tuesday night. Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Assistant, Associate, or Full Professor (wot) in Radiology, Cardiothoracic Imaging

first_imgPosition DescriptionThe Department of Radiology in the School of Medicine at theUniversity of Washington in Seattle is seeking applications for onefull-time faculty position at the level of Assistant Professor,Associate Professor, or Full Professor without tenure, commensuratewith experience, to join faculty members in the CardiothoracicImaging section with an anticipated start date of September 1,2021.  School of Medicine faculty members have an annualservice period of 12 months (July 1-June 30).The section seeks an individual who will engage in scholarlywork, teaching, and clinical service in a mixture of pulmonary andcardiac imaging.  The successful candidate will work withcardiovascular MRI and CT, chest CT and chest radiographs.The Cardiothoracic Imaging section currently has six facultymembers with a range of expertise in pulmonary and cardiac imagingand provides pulmonary, vascular, cardiac CT and MR diagnosticinterpretations.  The section maintains close relationshipswith internal medicine, pulmonology, oncology, bone marrowtransplantation, cardiology, and cardiac and thoracic surgeryservices at all hospital sites; the University of WashingtonMedical Center Montlake and Northwest campuses, Harborview MedicalCenter, and Seattle Cancer Care Alliance.  CardiothoracicImaging has an active fellowship program and faculty areresponsible for the instruction of cardiothoracic imaging fellows,in addition to medical students and diagnostic radiologyresidents.The University of Washington (UW) is a leading referral centerfor interstitial lung diseases, lung transplantation, thoracicsurgery, thoracic oncology, structural and congenital heartdisease, interventional cardiology and hematology. Cardiothoracic Imaging conducts conferences for inpatient internalmedicine services, pulmonary medicine, interventional cardiology,oncology, and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Institute, apremier transplantation center.UW is listed as one of the nation’s top public educational andresearch institutions, and the School of Medicine has been rankedsecond in the world, among the top two recipients of federalresearch grants.  Our hospitals consistently rank among thevery best.  The Department of Radiology is internationallyrecognized as dynamic, progressive, and high impact, consummatewith UW Medicine’s ranking as one of the nation’s leadinghealthcare delivery enterprises.  All UW faculty engage inteaching, research, and service.Seattle is a cosmopolitan city that ranks among the top urbanareas for quality of life.  It is a hub for aerospace,technology, and maritime industries, and is a headquartered by someof the world’s largest companies.  Seattle is alsofamily-friendly with nationally ranked schools.  The proximityof water, forests, and mountains attract nature lovers and outdoorenthusiasts.  Our faculty enjoy outstanding benefits, strongsupport for professional growth, and an environment noted fordiversity, community involvement, intellectual excitement, andartistic pursuits.  QualificationsCandidates should meet the following requirements:D., or foreign equivalent, in medicine and eligibility for fullmedical licensure in Washington StateBe board certified or board eligible in diagnosticradiologyCompletion of an ACGME-accredited residency in diagnosticradiology and have completed a fellowship training incardiothoracic imagingDemonstrated record of scientific presentations orpublicationsIn order to be eligible for University sponsorship for an H-1Bvisa, graduates of foreign (non-U.S.) medical schools must showsuccessful completion of all three steps of the U.S. MedicalLicensing Exam (USMLE), or equivalent as determined by theSecretary of Health and Human Services. InstructionsPlease upload the following required forms as part of theapplication process:  Updated CV and a Letter of Interest orCover Letter.  In your cover letter, please includeinformation about your experiences with and/or commitments todiversity, equity, and inclusion.  Apply online throughInterfolio here: https://apply.interfolio.com/85069Address inquiries to:Karen Ordovas, M.D., MASProfessor, Department of RadiologyUniversity of Washington1959 NE Pacific StreetSeattle, WA 98195Email:  [email protected]center_img Equal Employment Opportunity StatementUniversity of Washington is an affirmative action and equalopportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receiveconsideration for employment without regard to race, color, creed,religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, marital status,pregnancy, genetic information, gender identity or expression, age,disability, or protected veteran status.Commitment to DiversityThe University of Washington is committed to buildingdiversity among its faculty, librarian, staff, and studentcommunities, and articulates that commitment in the UW DiversityBlueprint (http://www.washington.edu/diversity/diversity-blueprint/).Additionally, the University’s Faculty Code recognizes facultyefforts in research, teaching and/or service that address diversityand equal opportunity as important contributions to a facultymember’s academic profile and responsibilities(https://www.washington.edu/admin/rules/policies/FCG/FCCH24.html#2432).last_img read more

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Coordinator of Case Management

first_imgOther Duties and Responsibilities Essential Functions Position StatusExempt Job Summary Supervisory Relationships Posting NumberS00281P Please provide contact information for three references in therequired “Other” document.Elmhurst University is a leading institution of higher educationthat seamlessly blends liberal learning and professionalpreparation to help students reach their full potential. ElmhurstUniversity offers more than 70 undergraduate majors, 15 graduateprograms, degree-completion programs for busy adults, and theacclaimed Elmhurst Learning and Success Academy for young adultswith developmental disabilities. Elmhurst University is one of theTop 10 Colleges in the Midwest, according to U.S. News & WorldReport; and U.S. News, Money and Forbes magazines consistently rankElmhurst as one of the Midwest’s best values in highereducation.Recruiting and retaining a diverse workforce is a criticalcomponent of the University’s mission, vision and core values. Ourcommitment stems from the belief that an institution of higherlearning is enriched by the presence of diversity. ElmhurstUniversity is an EO Employer. Elmhurst University prohibitsdiscrimination and harassment of any type and affords equalemployment opportunities to employees and applicants without regardto race, color, national origin, gender, sexual orientation,religion, age, creed, ancestry, veteran status, marital status,disability, or any other characteristic protected by law. Working Conditions/Physical Requirements Salary Grade Under the direction of the Director of Student Support Services andIntervention and of the Assistant Dean of Students & Title IXCoordinator, the Coordinator of Case Management works to addressthe needs of students who struggle with mental health andbehavioral issues, social adjustment matters, academic stress,financial and housing insecurity, and other life challenges. TheCoordinator also investigates and adjudicates low-level allegedviolations of the University’s Community Standards and serves as aTitle IX Investigator. This position collaborates with internal andexternal resources to offer individualized student support. Preferred Qualifications • A Master’s Degree in Student Personnel, Counseling, HigherEducation Administration, or a related discipline.• At least two years of graduate assistant experience with casemanagement/student conduct or other related student affairs areas,or one year of professional experience.• Demonstrated experience with and sensitivity to individuals ofdiverse cultural backgrounds and a commitment to a diversecommunity.• Ability to handle a significant caseload and manage multipledeadlines.• Ability to function within a team environment and collaboratewith others.• Excellent verbal, written, and technological communicationskills.• Willingness to work flexible hours (evenings and weekends on alimited basis).• Ability to interpret federal and state nondiscrimination laws,including Title IX, VAWA, Clery, FERPA, and any other applicablelaws.• Outstanding customer service skills.• Exercise superior judgement managing highly sensitive andconfidential communications.• Knowledge of student development theory, and an understanding ofcurrent trends in case management and student conduct. Closing Date Posting Date03/19/0021 Employee is subject to indoor work, protected from weatherconditions. Work is sedentary in nature and involves exerting up to10 lbs. of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of forcefrequently/constantly in order to lift, carry, push, pull orotherwise move object. Minimum Qualifications • Work in conjunction with the appropriate University entities tocomply with the Clery Act, FERPA, Title IX, the Drug-Free Schoolsand Communities Act, and the Higher Education Act.• Serve as a designated Campus Security Authority ( CSA ), asdefined by the Clery Act, and ensure the appropriate, timely, andaccurate reporting of any crimes on campus, and serve as a MandatedReporter under Title IX regulations.• Sustain strong collaborative relationships with campus partnersin the Office of Student Affairs, Academic Affairs, Access &Disability Services, Wellness Center, Athletics, Housing andResidence Life, Public Safety, the Title IX Coordinator and otherareas to provide a comprehensive network of support for students inneed.• Serve on University and divisional committees as assigned.• Maintain professional conduct and ethical behavior at alltimes. Work Hours Open Until Filled Posting Text Reporting Relationship(s)Director of Student Support Services and Intervention Case Management (60%)• Provide case management and organization for student of concerncases, including coordinating and tracking action plans andcontinuity of care as needed.• Assist referred students in making use of University and/orcommunity services and resources to meet specific needs related toacademic stress, legal issues, mental health services, financialsupport agencies, food services, etc.• Serve as a point of contact for campus community members who areseeking consultation and advice about our services for students whoseem to be experiencing distress.• Maintain case management database and records of interactionswith students via Maxient.• Gather initial information, determine behavioral interventions,and develop and communicate recommendations in response to studentneeds.• Establish assessment and evaluation procedures for casemanagement.• Communicate sensitive and confidential matters regarding complexcases within the guidelines of FERPA .Student Conduct (40%)• Maintain student conduct files in accordance with Universitypolicies via Maxient.• Review and assign student conduct incidents and adjudicatelow-level alleged violations of the Student Code of Conduct.• Ensure cases are resolved in a manner consistent with the goalsof the Division of Student Affairs and the University.• Facilitate trainings, workshops, and presentations regardingstudent conduct, conflict resolution, and student wellbeing asneeded.• Mediate conflict among members of the community as concernsarise.• Participate as a Title IX Investigator to investigate reports ofsexual harassment, sexual assault, dating and domestic violence,and stalking. Direct Link to this Postinghttps://elmhurst.simplehire.com/postings/1302 Special Instructions to Applicants Applicant DocumentsRequired DocumentsResumeCover LetterOther DocumentOptional Documents Supplemental QuestionsRequired fields are indicated with an asterisk (*).last_img read more

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Alphabet could use Hudson Yards as template to finance Toronto megaproject

first_imgSidewalk Labs CEO Dan Doctoroff with a rendering of Alphabet’s project in Toronto (top) and Hudson Yards (bottom). (Credit: Sidewalk Labs and Twitter)Alphabet, Google’s parent company, may look to Hudson Yards as a model for how to finance an 800-acre urban hub along a downtrodden part of Toronto’s waterfront.Sidewalk Labs, a Google sister company, is exploring options that could include selling bonds backed by tax revenue and development charges from the commercial site, Bloomberg reported. The model could be similar to part of the $25 billion plan for Hudson Yards: Investors funded about $3 billion worth of special-purpose Hudson Yards Infrastructure Corp. bonds that went to the development of the 7 subway line and other infrastructure.“We devised this approach, which said, we’ll go to bondholders and get them to put up the money on the hope that there would be development in the area,” CEO Dan Doctoroff told Bloomberg. “We will devote all of those incremental tax revenues and some other related revenue streams to the payment of debt service on the bond.”ADVERTISEMENTDoctoroff, who spearheaded Hudson Yards’ development as a deputy mayor, says the area has the same need for a light-rail link to the Toronto development. The bonds would be issued by a special purpose corporation, he said.The company is controversially also weighing a proposal to take a cut of property taxes, development charges and increased land values in the project to help cover infrastructure costs that could total $4.5 billion over the next 30 years.Sidewalk Labs plans to submit an official proposal in the next three months or so, the report said. It includes first revitalizing a 12-acre neighborhood, called Quayside, which would include a new Google campus.The firm has held some “very preliminary” conversations on financing with several pension funds across Canada and is working with a number of investment banks. [Bloomberg] — Meenal Vamburkar This content is for subscribers only.Subscribe Nowlast_img read more

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ASP Scan (Weekly) for Dec 15, 2017

first_imgOur weekly wrap-up of antimicrobial stewardship & antimicrobial resistance scansStudy: No benefit from adding rifampicin to S aureus bacteremia treatmentThe results of a large randomized trial show that adjunctive rifampicin provided no overall benefit over standard antibiotic therapy in adults with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia, UK researchers reported yesterday in The Lancet.For many years, the researchers explain, it’s been hypothesized that adding rifampicin to the standard treatment for S aureus bacteremia (either an anti-staphylococcal penicillin or a glycopeptide if the bacteria are resistant to methicillin) might improve outcomes for the infection, which is one of the most common and serious community- and hospital-acquired infections worldwide. That belief has led to widespread use of rifampicin for treatment of S aureus bacteremia, even though the evidence to support the benefit is weak.To test the hypothesis that adjunctive rifampicin is beneficial for S aureus bacteremia patients, the researchers conducted a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of adults with S aureus bacteremia treated at 29 UK hospitals from December 2012 through October 2016. The participants were randomized 1:1 to receive either rifampicin or a placebo for 2 weeks, plus standard antibiotic therapy as chosen by the attending physician. The primary outcome was bacteriologically confirmed treatment failure or disease recurrence, or death (all-cause), from randomization to 12 weeks.Of the 758 eligible participants, 370 received rifampicin and 388 received a placebo in addition to standard therapy. Standard antibiotics were given for a median duration of 29 days, and 619 participants (82%) received flucloxacillin. By week 12, bacteriologically confirmed treatment failure or disease recurrence, or death, had occurred in 62 participants (17%) in the rifampicin group compared with 71 patients (18%) in the placebo group (absolute risk difference -1.4%, hazard ratio 0.96). While there was a small but significant reduction in disease recurrence associated with rifampicin, that effect had no impact on short-term or long-term mortality. In addition, patients treated with rifampicin had more adverse events than those treated with placebo (17% vs. 10%) and were more likely to have drug interactions that complicated their treatment (6% vs. 2%)”In summary, adjunctive rifampicin did not improve outcomes from S aureus bacteraemia, with the exception of a modest reduction in disease recurrence,” the authors conclude. Dec 14 Lancet studyDec 14 Lancet commentary Irish study finds VRE contamination common in the ICUIrish researchers report that intensive care unit (ICU) environmental contamination with vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in areas near patients is common, even in non-outbreak settings, according to a study yesterday in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.In the single-center study, conducted in the ICU of an 820-bed teaching hospital in Dublin, investigators took samples from the ICU environment and patients during seven sampling periods from October 2012 through June 2014. The aim of the study was to identify potential reservoirs of VRE, investigate the clinical and molecular epidemiology of VRE outside of outbreaks, and assess the role of active surveillance cultures (ASCs) in identifying VRE patients in this setting. Ireland has the highest rate of VRE bloodstream infections in Europe at 45.8%.Of 289 sampling occasions involving 157 patients and their bed spaces, VRE isolates were recovered from patient bed spaces, clinical samples, or both on 114 of 289 sampling occasions (39.4%). The patient and their bed space were positive for VRE on 34 of 114 VRE-associated sampling occasions (29.8%). Thirty of the 157 patients (19%) were VRE-colonized.Of 1,647 environment samples, 107 sites (6.5%) were VRE positive, with significantly greater VRE recovery from isolation rooms than from the open-plan area (9.1% vs 4.1%). The most frequently VRE-contaminated sites were the drip stand, bed control panel, and chart holders, which together accounted for 61% of contaminated sites. The use of ASCs resulted in a 172% increase in identification of VRE-colonized patients. Molecular typing revealed two environmental clusters, one involving three patients and generally greater heterogeneity of patient isolates compared to environmental isolates.The authors conclude that better infection control policies that limit environmental transmission of VRE in the ICU are needed. Dec 14 Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol study Palestinian study finds good response to ICU stewardship interventionA prospective audit-and-feedback antimicrobial stewardship program (ASP) in a Palestinian ICU found a high acceptance rate for the ASP team’s recommendations, according to a study this week in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.The ASP program was begun at the Palestinian Medical Complex in September 2015. The investigators analyzed data from the 4 months before and the 4 months after implementation.They found that, of 176 recommendations made by the ASP team, 78.4% were accepted. The most often accepted interventions were dose optimization (87%) and de-escalation based on culture results (84.4%). In addition, interventions were associated with a 24.3% reduction in antimicrobial use, shorter length of stay, and significantly reduced duration of therapy. Dec 13 Br J Clin Pharmacol study More cases of puppy-linked Campylobacter reported in several statesOriginally published by CIDRAP News Dec 13The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in an update on an ongoing outbreak of multi-drug resistant Campylobacter infections linked to puppies sold in pet shops today, confirmed 30 new cases reported since the last outbreak update published on Oct 30.As of yesterday, officials have reported that 97 people in 17 states have laboratory-confirmed infections or symptoms consistent with Campylobacter infection. A total of 22 people have been hospitalized, but no deaths have been reported. The first cases were reported to the CDC in June.The vast majority of patients (98%) reported contact with a puppy in the week preceding illness. Ninety percent of people interviewed said they had contact with a puppy from a Petland store, or had contact with a person who became sick after contact with a puppy from a Petland store. Twenty-one ill people worked at a Petland store.Using whole genome sequencing, the CDC identified multiple antimicrobial resistance genes and mutations in most isolates from 35 ill people and 9 puppies, including resistance to azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, erythromycin, nalidixic acid, telithromycin, and tetracycline.Dec 13 CDC update Clinicians call for more inclusive trials for new antibioticsOriginally published by CIDRAP News Dec 12A letter today in the Journal of Infectious Diseases argues for relaxed criteria for patient exclusion in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for new drugs to treat multidrug-resistant infections.The letter, written by two Israeli clinicians, describes three patients with severe infections caused by carbapenem-resistant bacteria that presented during a single day at a hospital in Haifa. None of the three patients, the authors note, was eligible for an ongoing RCT at the hospital to assess the antibiotic cefiderocol—a novel siderophore cephalosporin in late-stage development—versus the best available therapy for bloodstream and other severe multidrug-resistant infections. All were treated with colistin as the only covering antibiotic.These cases, the authors argue, point out a paradox. While it’s estimated that more than 700,000 patients die each year from infections caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens, and plenty of patients with carbapenem-resistant infections are described in epidemiologic studies, finding patients for drug approval RCTs is difficult. That’s because RCTs are often biased toward uncomplicated patients with a low risk of death, and the patients with the types of conditions described in their letter—neutropenia, severe sepsis, and organ failure—are often excluded from such studies. Yet these are the patients who may have the greatest need for new treatments.While efforts to improve testing and approval requirements of new drugs for unmet needs have been commendable, the authors write, “We would like a discussion about the changes in regulatory guidance to the industry that would relax criteria for patient exclusion to ensure that the patients in [an] RTC resemble a bit more the patients in need of the antibiotic under study.”Dec 12 J Infect Dis letter Commentary: Vaccines needed in the fight against AMROriginally published by CIDRAP News Dec 12Vaccines could and should play a key role in stemming the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) crisis, according to a commentary today in Nature.The commentary, co-authored by the chief scientist at GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines and professors from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, calls for a global strategic effort to prioritize development of a portfolio of vaccines to target AMR.Their reasoning is based on several factors. For one, they argue, vaccines almost never prompt bacteria to develop resistance. In addition, scientists have had much more success over the last 30 years developing new vaccines than they’ve had discovering new antibiotics. Since the 1980s, 22 new vaccines have been deployed in the clinic, while no new truly new class of antibiotics has been discovered or engineered. And vaccine technology continues to evolve.Given this reality, and the fact that several current vaccines—such as the pneumococcal and influenza vaccines—have already helped directly and indirectly reduce the need for antibiotics, the authors say vaccines must be considered an essential element of the fight against AMR, along with new antibiotics, diagnostics, surveillance, and stewardship. Launching an effort to develop a portfolio of vaccines against AMR, they say, will require policymakers and stakeholders to raise awareness about the potential of vaccines to combat AMR, to persuade governments and drug companies of the cost-effectiveness of investing in vaccines, and to prioritize which bacterial strains should be targeted.”Over the past few years, key institutional stakeholders — notably the [World Health Organization], the [United Nations General Assembly], the World Bank, the G20 group of countries, the European Union and the UK and US governments — have called for researchers to develop new antibiotics to expand our arsenal in the war against superbugs,” the authors write. “We appeal to these organizations to call now for a multi-layered strategy that prioritizes the development of vaccines to target resistant strains.”Dec 12 Nature comment Interventions to reduce overtreatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria notedOriginally published by CIDRAP News Dec 11A paper today in JAMA Internal Medicine proposes an evidence-based implementation guide to help reduce inappropriate treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB).Despite efforts to reduce the practice, treatment of ASB—defined as isolation of bacteria in an uncontaminated urine specimen in the absence of urinary tract infection symptoms—remains prevalent across settings and frequently leads to inappropriate antibiotic prescribing. A multicenter retrospective review of three US hospitals found that 38% of in patients with ASB were treated with antibiotics the day of a positive urine culture report, and 43% were treated by the fourth day.To come up with an implementation guide that could help clinicians reduce ASB overtreatment, a team of researchers from Johns Hopkins, Sinai Health System, and the University of Toronto first reviewed the evidence behind supporting reduced treatment of ASB. Based on that evidence, they determined that efforts to reduce inappropriate treatment of ASB in low-risk populations (excluding pregnant women and patients undergoing invasive urologic procedures) can reduce preventable harm from unnecessary antibiotic exposure.The team then looked at safety and quality outcomes data for different interventions aimed at reducing ASB treatment. From those data, they determined that the most successful interventions used a multimodal approach that combined the following elements: education, audit and feedback, withholding routine urine culture reports, and clinical decision support tools and protocols.”While the interventions described in this guide have proven efficacy in certain settings, we acknowledge the importance of context and encourage teams to select and adapt specific interventions that best suit the needs and resources specific to the institution,” the authors write. “In reality, a bundle of interventions may be needed to address different contributors to the problem specific to the local setting.”Dec 11 JAMA Internal Med paper New National Academies publication details AMR workshop proceedingsOriginally published by CIDRAP News Dec 11The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NAS) have released a new document summarizing the presentations and discussions at a 2-day workshop on antimicrobial resistance (AMR) held earlier this year.The workshop, held Jun 20 and 21 in Washington, DC, brought together experts in infectious disease, microbiology, and human and animal health to explore the issue of AMR through the One Health lens, which views the health of humans, animals, and the environment as interconnected. The workshop was convened to examine short-term actions and research needs that are feasible and cost-effective and will have the greatest effect on reducing AMR.Among the topics explored were the implications and effects on human health of the movement of resistance genes across different ecosystems; the expected effect of new US regulatory policies regarding the use of antibiotics in food animals; the role and effectiveness of antibiotic stewardship programs in reducing and preventing AMR, and the importance of data availability and data sharing for evaluating stewardship strategies; strategies for maintaining the effectiveness of existing drugs, for developing new drugs and diagnostics, and for implementing disease prevention steps; and the need for national and international collaboration.The document contains the opinion of the presenters, but it does not reflect the conclusions of the Health and Medicine Division of the NAS.Dec 8 National Academies proceedings of AMR workshoplast_img read more

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Santa Fe Wins Multiple Condé Nast Traveler 2019 Readers’ Choice Awards

first_imgAn internationally beloved travel destination, Santa Fe has finished in the top five in the “Top 10 Small Cities in the U.S.” category for several years, making it one of the most awarded cities. “Santa Fe is truly honored to be recognized by Condé Nast Traveler and its prestigious readers once again as one of the top 10 cities in the country,” TOURISM Santa Fe Executive Director Randy Randall. “Our city continues to evolve so we can continue to provide visitors with new ways to be immersed in Santa Fe. With legendary history and culture, an expansive art scene, accommodations with world-class status and most importantly, countless memorable experiences for visitors, The City Different lives up to its name. We are proud to continue winning national recognition as a top destination.” The full list of winners can be found here. SANTA FE News: Top 20 Hotels in USA/Southwest & West1st – Inn of the Five Graces2nd – La Fonda on the Plaza9th – Eldorado Hotel & Spa12th – Rosewood Inn of the Anasazi Santa Fe hotel The Inn of Five Graces ranked as the #1 hotel in the category of “Top 20 Hotels in USA/Southwest & West” and #4 on the list of “Top 10 Hotels in the USA.” In addition to the win for Inn of Five Graces, multiple hotels and resorts throughout The City Different were award winners. Honors for Santa Fe area properties include: The Condé Nast Traveler Readers’ Choice Awards are the longest-running and most prestigious recognition of excellence in the travel industry and commonly known as “the best of the best of travel”. Top 30 Resorts in USA/Southwest & Texas7th – La Posada de Santa Fe, a Tribute Portfolio Resort & Spa11th – Ojo Caliente Mineral Springs Resort & Spa30th – Four Seasons Resort Rancho Encantado Santa Fe “We are honored to have been selected in Condé Nast Traveler’s prestigious Reader’s Choice award again this year,” said The Inn of Five Graces co-owners Ira and Sylvia Seret. “Together with our son Sharif Seret, we have poured our love and creativity into The Inn of the Five Graces to create a little jewel in the Land of Enchantment. It means a great deal to us that readers have recognized the hotel in this way. We are hidden away on a historic street near the center of town, and one of the things that makes our hotel so special in addition to our outstanding staff and unparalleled service, is the artisan work from Silk Road countries that runs through every aspect of our property — it’s our signature Seret aesthetic. Santa Fe celebrates artists, and so do we. Over and over again we hear from guests what a unique and special experience they have when they stay with us.” SANTA FE ― Condé Nast Traveler announced Tuesday the results of its annual Readers’ Choice Awards. Top 10 Hotels in USA4th – Inn of the Five Graces Santa Fe placed #2 in the category of “Top 10 Small Cities in the U.S.”. The 2019 Readers’ Choice Awards published on Condé Nast Traveler’s website at www.cntraveler.com/rca and will be celebrated in the forthcoming November issue of Condé Nast Traveler US and UK print editions. To determine results, more than 600,000 Condé Nast Traveler readers across the globe submitted a recording-breaking number of responses rating their travel experiences to provide a full snapshot of where and how people travel today.last_img read more

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When Stars Collide

first_imgAmerican Red Cross supporters will come together on Thursday, August 1, at Calissa in Water Mill, for the inaugural “When Stars Collide” summer fundraiser. Funds raised will help the Red Cross provide urgent humanitarian relief, globally and locally, to communities impacted by disasters large and small, here on Long Island and across the country.“The American Red Cross is such a vital and powerful community partner to Long Island and to communities impacted by disaster around the country,” said Neela Lockel, the CEO of American Red Cross on Long Island. “The scope and impact of our work touches so many lives each and every day.”“When Stars Collide” is sponsored by The Independent and Simple Vodka. It’s hosted by the Young Professionals of Long Island, an American Red Cross volunteer, donor, and networking group.The American Red Cross on Long Island, made up of more than 1000 volunteers, responds to more than 200 local disasters a year in Nassau and Suffolk counties, providing emergency assistance in the form of shelter, food, financial assistance, relief supplies, emotional support, and more. When the need arises, many of these same volunteers deploy far from home to lend a hand following large-scale disasters outside our region.The Red Cross also works to build resilient and strong communities by installing thousands of free smoke alarms in at-risk neighborhoods, by teaching water safety and first aid, and by empowering families with vital disaster-preparedness skills. Additionally, the Red Cross collects lifesaving blood and provides unwavering support to Long Island service members and their families. The event will be held from 6 to 8 PM. Tickets to the event are $75 and include cocktails, provided by Simple Vodka, and bites by Calissa. For tickets and more info, visit www.redcross.org/[email protected] Sharelast_img read more

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