Category: tpborlpufejx

Centre Point for sale for £85m

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North-west supplement: Introduction

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Sophie B. Riffs With G.E. At Guild Hall

first_imgIt’s such a cliché to say that someone “broke the mold,” and it doesn’t even apply to Sophie B. Hawkins — best known for her ‘90s hits “Damn, I Wish I Was Your Lover” and “As I Lay Me Down.” Because there is no mold to break. Hawkins, who will appear with G.E. Smith on Friday, July 27, as part of Smith’s “Portraits” series at Guild Hall, along with legendary folk guitarist and musician Trevor Hall, is utterly original.It might be easy to peg her as a two-hit wonder for some, but then they don’t know Hawkins. Her first album, Tongues and Tails, featured not only a bevy of beautifully-crafted songs but also the noises of trains, other languages, whispers, rhythmic beats, animal calls; a compendium of sounds which created a mish-mosh of intrigue. It was so much more than what the 1992 hit single promised, which was perhaps a few frothy pop confectionaries. She continued in her own style with other albums, telling her powerful stories in her raw and pure voice.Hawkins composes, sings, plays percussion along with piano and guitar (and even a little cello), and is known for her colorful paintings depicting both the figurative and abstract. “I always have been most inspired by emotions expressed in images and stories told symbolically,” she said, though musically “I did flip out for Billie Holiday, David Bowie, and sometimes Bob Dylan. I liked different things about each one, but now I would say I love an artist like Nick Drake the most.”Hawkins is also the mother of two young children, having had the foresight at the age of 30 of freezing her fertilized eggs for a later date.But first, let’s talk about her new stuff, and what she’ll be bringing to Guild Hall. How is it valid, how does it connect to her life today?“I’m so glad you asked that,” Hawkins began, as we chatted at the home of Smith and his wife, Taylor Barton, who is producing the “Portraits” series. “First of all, when I was writing these new songs, I was experiencing a personal tsunami. I didn’t ask for it. It wasn’t coming from me, but it was happening to me.”Her son, Dashiell, was five, when Hawkins, a long-time denizen of the West Coast, decided to move back East. “Back to the Upper West Side,” she said, near where she went to high school. “And then all of these songs started pouring out of me. I was gigging around and basically finding my feet again — this single mother wanting to record, wanting to begin again.”The new album carries Hawkins’ signature style, painting beautiful scenes of love, heartbreak, self-awareness, and everything in between. “I’m Better Off Without You” is an empowering tale about betrayal and the strength that comes from it. She explained, “The worst thing that could happen, the thing I most feared, actually set me free.”“Love Yourself,” which she rehearsed with Smith that afternoon in Amagansett, is a wonderful lesson of self-acceptance, in which Hawkins learns to enjoy the peace of just being herself. “Consume Me In Your Fire” is a raw poem about being drawn to the fire and letting yourself burn, not worrying about anything else, because it’s all transitional.After moving back to Manhattan, she then got pregnant with Esther at 50 years old. These were, of course, both planned pregnancies, but Hawkins swears that she heard Esther calling to her to come into being before she even made the decision to have another baby. “She was talking to me,” Hawkins said, becoming emotional. “The same with Dashiell. I heard his soul literally speaking to me for a year before I got pregnant. I had been so insecure about being a good mother, but he reassured me. And then he just came. It was no effort at all. The same with Esther.”She had initially frozen the embryos “for stem cell research, ostensibly,” she said. “So I could donate them to someone who had an accident, a spinal injury.” And she didn’t plan on getting pregnant at first. “My career has always been like climbing up a hill, backward,” she said. “I’d been fighting against the currents forever. But nothing makes me happier than my kids.”Working with G.E. Smith on stage gives Hawkins a chance to “introduce the new stuff. I feel like this is going to be a turning point for me creatively,” she said. So how has her sound evolved?“I’m not sure my sound has evolved,” she said, “but I’m definitely saying different things as I live, as I grow. I would say I include more parts of myself each passing year, and I’m more comfortable with all parts. There is a beauty to my old songs, an austere purity, and there is a comforting acceptance in the new songs. I think the emergence of my mother self has given the music a more roomy, perhaps less urgent, but equally as passionate quality.”And she’s really looking forward to her Guild Hall performance with Smith. “I worked with G.E. 20 years ago, and I adored his playing of course, but more so his presence,” she said. “He is generous, alert, like a child, and yet wise. I suppose he’s grown into his wisdom. I look forward to being present with him onstage. It will be a surprise for both of us. I know he can explore with me in the moment, and that’s what we’ll do.”Tickets for G.E. Smith’s “Portraits” with Sophie B. Hawkins and Trevor Hall can be purchased on the www.guildhall.org website, or by calling the Guild Hall box office at 631-324-4050. The performance, which starts at 8 PM, is also eligible for student rush tickets.bridget@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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Riley Ridge regresa a la senda – EXCLUSIVA

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Airgas enters hydrogen agreement

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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GE Oil & Gas Completes Assembly of Subsea Trees for Gorgon Project

first_imgGE Oil & Gas announced it has completed the assembly of the final group of subsea production trees for the Chevron-operated Gorgon Project, one of the world’s largest natural gas projects located off the coast of Western Australia.Subsea trees are a key component of a subsea gathering system, consisting of various assemblies of valves, spools and fittings, used to monitor and control the flow of production wells. They also manage the fluids and gas that are injected into subsea wells.At twice the capacity of those previously manufactured by GE, the 20 subsea trees are the first 7-inch, full bore trees that GE Oil & Gas has ever produced. The trees were specifically designed to manage production from the high rate gas field in the Gorgon development.The trees were designed, assembled and prepared for shipment in Aberdeen and Montrose in Scotland. The controls modules incorporated within the tree were designed, manufactured and assembled in Nailsea in the U.K., while GE’s operation in Norway provided the connection systems.The final shipment of trees has now begun its journey to Western Australia and upon arrival, it will be transported to GE’s Jandakot services and training facility in Perth for pre-installation testing before being deployed in the Greater Gorgon fields where it will operate at depths of up to 1,350 meters (4,429 feet).The Gorgon Project involves the development of the Greater Gorgon Area gas fields, including the Gorgon and Jansz-Io fields, located between 130 and 220 kilometres off the northwest coast of Western Australia. The Gorgon Project also is the largest single resource project in Australia’s history.GE’s subsea trees supply contract is part of a series of agreements with Chevron, valued at a combined $1.7 billion, to deliver subsea production equipment and advanced turbomachinery as well as long-term services to support the Gorgon Project.GE Oil & Gas’ Subsea Systems business has reliably served the offshore market for more than 50 years and is at the forefront of global subsea field development, with advanced system integration capabilities and more than 7,000 systems installed worldwide.Press Release, September 05, 2013last_img read more

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What the High Court victory means for BSF

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

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BIM: Start at the end

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

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Crown advocates struggling – report

first_imgThe quality of Crown advocacy has deteriorated, inspectors reported last week.HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate said themes highlighted for improvement in a 2012 review remain, particularly in relation to contested advocacy, ‘with Crown advocates struggling to cross-examine effectively and having a tendency to present rather than prosecute cases’.Since 2012, it said: ‘There has been no substantial improvement in performance and where any action has been taken to address [recommendations] there is no demonstrable business impact.’last_img read more

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Double-tracking progress in Sumatra

first_imgINDONESIA: Minister of State-Owned Enterprises Dahlan Iskan attended celebrations on the island of Sumatra on June 10 to mark completion of 22 km of double-tracking between Niru and Prabumulih on the 370 km Palembang – Bandar Lampung line.In addition, 11 stations have been opened along the route, five in Lampung province and the remainder in South Sumatra. In part, the investment in stations is intended to help manage strong seasonal demand for passenger services, especially during the Eid al-Fitr holiday. The line is typically served by two PT KAI long-distance passenger trains each day, and also carries large volumes of coal traffic. PT KAI President Ignasius Jonan indicated that a further 266 km of railway in southern Sumatra would be double-tracked to increase capacity for both passenger and coal traffic, and suggested six more stations could be opened. In the north of the island, a groundbreaking ceremony held on May 22 marked the start of double-tracking on the 26 km line between Medan and Kuala Namu international airport. Due for completion by the end of this year, the work is expected to cost 150bn rupiah. Subsequent phases envisage grade separation of the route to remove 12 level crossings in the city of Medan by 2017 at a cost of 3·9tr rupiah.last_img read more

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