Category: aofxjgovtzxx

Re-edited Carlton cinema plans set for premiere

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M&S to close six stores

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Jamaica’s COVID-19 recoveries reach 60%

first_imgRecord number of COVID-19 recoveries for JamaicaOn Wednesday Jamaica recorded the highest number of recoveries in a day since COVID-19 first visited the island’s shores in March. Twenty-six additional Jamaicans are recovering from COVID-19, putting the total number of recoveries at 171, up from 145 a day earlier. This 171 puts the island’s recovery rate at…May 21, 2020In “General”Jamaica reports first day with no new COVID-19 casesFor the first time in some 50 days, Jamaica has recorded no new positive cases of COVID-19 on the island even as recoveries rose to 118, up from 113 in the last 24 hours. The total number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Jamaica remains at 509. In addition to the…May 15, 2020In “General”Jamaica records Two COVID-19 deaths, 74 new positivesThe Ministry of Health and Wellness confirms two new COVID-19 related deaths. The deceased are a 90-year-old male of a Kingston & St. Andrew address and a 34-year-old female of a St James address, who’s death previously reported as under investigation. Both also had comorbidities and we express condolences to…September 11, 2020In “General”Share this on WhatsApp Jamaica’s COVID-19 recovery numbers reached 356 in the last 24 hours as 34 additional persons were released from care. The island now has a recovery rate of 60 per cent. You may be interested in… Six Eastern Caribbean countries deemed safe for travel – CDC Oct 16, 2020 The island’s testing numbers are now up to 13,407. In addition to the 590 confirmed positives, there are 12,784 negatives and 33 pending. Oct 16, 2020 Oct 15, 2020 91 imported cases;27 local transmission cases not epidemiologically linked; and 20 cases under investigation.Some 339 or 57% of the confirmed cases are females and 251 or 43% are males. They range in age from 2 months to 87 years. Oct 15, 2020 CMO says Saint Lucia at critical stage of COVID-19 outbreak St. Lucia records more cases of COVID More deaths from COVID-19 recorded in CARICOM countries,… They bring to 235 the number of persons linked to a workplace cluster and to 217 the contacts of confirmed cases. In addition, Jamaica now has: frequently wash and/or sanitise hands and surfaces;maintain a physical distance of six feet from each other; and avoid crowds. The Ministry of Health and Wellness continues to encourage the public to remain vigilant in the effort to contain the spread of COVID-19. Jamaicans are advised to: One of the cases is a male, age 69, from St. Catherine. The other is a female, age 23, also from St. Catherine. Both cases are related to the workplace cluster in St. Catherine. Members of the public are further advised to wear a mask when physical distancing cannot be maintained. Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… Also in the last day, Jamaica recorded two new confirmed positives, bringing the total number for the island to 590.last_img read more

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The Future of Maritime Security in the Indian Ocean

first_imgA shift in US foreign policy based both on changes to the threat landscape and improving domestic energy security could lead to an increase in threats to shipping within eighteen months according to David Hunkin of Dryad Maritime Intelligence.A US Navy search and seizure team assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Kidd (DDG 100) board the Iranian-flagged fishing dhow Al Molai (U.S. Navy photo)With the US strategic focus now firmly fixed on the Asia Pacific region and Iran ‘coming in from the cold’, it is only a matter of time before western navies begin withdrawing the warships that have been so successful in suppressing piracy. Then what? With no convoys and no rescue forces, the commercial shipping industry could be left to fend for itself.According to Edward L Morse, the Managing Director and Global Head of Commodities at Citigroup, “The US will become a net exporter of energy by 2020 and so for the first time in living memory, it will no longer have concerns over Gulf oil or threats to its supply.”Asia is the new US focus economically, politically and from a security perspective. Asia is where the next threats and opportunities for the US will arise. The Middle East is losing its importance and American and British armed forces are already withdrawing from the region much to the consternation of GCC states.Baroness Ashton’s recent visit to Iran, the first such visit since 2008, was a significant step in the normalisation of relations with this once pariah state. Having suffered years of suffocating sanctions, all the indications are that Iran is ready and eager to resume normal diplomatic ties with those whom they once saw as enemies.Businesses too are gearing up to return to Iran as they prepare for a huge market to re-open and to resume trading with a population that has become increasingly western facing in recent years. On current evidence, there appears to be genuine moves to re-engage and for Iran to make a meaningful return to the global stage and resume normal diplomatic and commercial relations with global trading partners.NATO and EU maritime forces have been highly successful in suppressing Somali piracy in recent years especially considering that it was not their primary role. It’s no secret that those maritime forces were deployed primarily to deter and be ready to defend against a miscalculation by Iran or a third party against a backdrop of an ambiguous nuclear ambition and a potential return to regional hegemony.For years, some of the most capable maritime platforms in the world were deployed east of Suez just in case Iran did the unthinkable. It could be argued that piracy was a helpful diversion, giving underemployed warships and aircraft a much needed and laudable role in defending commercial maritime trade whilst waiting for the apocalypse.But with the threat landscape changing, pressure is mounting to bring those forces home and over the next 18-months, it is expected that the naval presence east of Suez will be very different to what it is today.So what does that mean to the vital shipping that will still be plying the waters of the once “pirate infested waters” of the Indian Ocean? Well it could well lead to a return to the bad old days of piracy and, it could be argued, it may even be worse than before.Whilst progress has been made in Somalia, the business model of piracy has not been irreversibly broken as numerous NATO commanders have warned. Piracy has been contained rather than solved and so if that containment is removed, piracy will return.Not only could a reduction in naval forces herald a return of piracy, it would also most certainly result in a reduction of rescue forces. At present, should a ship’s crew retreat to a citadel as pirates take control of their vessel, rescue forces are only hours or days away.With a drawdown of maritime forces, such rescue could be weeks away or it may not even materialise at all and it is highly unlikely that parachuting special-forces into the middle of the ocean to retake a pirated vessel with no on-scene naval forces will be considered as a viable hostage rescue solution.So the nexus of reducing international tension and reducing economic significance seems inevitable. At some stage in the near future, naval forces will withdraw and Somalia will still be a largely lawless and ungoverned space and piracy may well return.Governments, international organisations, the shipping industry and the private maritime security industry have around 18-months to forge a solution, in order to avoid this prediction. Dialogue needs to begin now to agree how the vacuum left by redeploying military forces is going to be filled, most likely by a commercial solution or a mix of commercial and defence capabilities.The Indian Ocean has recent and painful history of expensive private security solutions and yet placing armed guards on ships is comparatively straightforward when compared to the complexity and scale of the ‘area security challenge’ faced by maritime forces.The solution can’t be the same commercially; industry needs to be innovative, imaginative and ultimately cost effective. Extreme caution should be exercised before revisiting the issue of ‘private navies’ however with many models already tried and failed due to the complexity and costs involved.Likewise, it is imperative that only stakeholders with the right maritime background engage in this discussion. The private maritime security industry became the new gold rush for former soldiers frustrated with earnings dwindling in both Iraq and Afghanistan.Whilst admirably entrepreneurial, most lack the experience and skills required to solve this complex multi-dimensional maritime problem. Whatever their background however, the dialogue needs to begin now to decide how the commercial sector can ensure that shipping is protected when the politicians no longer care and the warships have gone home.The clock is ticking but for once there is time to establish an effective a solution provided the reality and enormity of this situation is acknowledged and measures put in place to ensure the safety of those plying their lawful trade upon the Indian Ocean. [mappress]dryadmaritime, April 7, 2014last_img read more

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Global trade growth set to accelerate says DHL

first_imgCompared to the previous release in March, the overall GTB index rose by one point, now standing at 67 points. According to the GTB methodology, an index value above 50 signals a positive growth forecast.According to DHL, the increase is notable as it shows that the rising international trade disputes have had no impact on the data on which the barometer is based.The rise in the overall index was primarily driven by a slight increase for containerised ocean freight, which has now reached an index value of 64 points, compared to 63 in March. The index for global air trade remained unchanged at 70 points.Geographically, the global improvement was mainly driven by more optimistic outlooks for China and South Korea. The trade forecast for the USA has also improved slightly. The positive impact by these three countries was partially offset by reduced outlooks for India, Japan and the UK.Despite a strong decline by 5 points in the outlook for India, the country still has the highest forecast for overall trade growth with 79 points. In contrast, the UK has the least favourable outlook with now 57 index points, down 4 points compared to March.Germany, meanwhile, remains somewhat in between: a significant increase in airfreight by 3 points is offset by a 1 point decline in oceanfreight. This amounts to an unchanged overall forecast for Germany – which is still markedly positive with an index value of 64.The DHL Global Barometer is published four times a year. The next release date is September 26, 2018.www.dhl.comlast_img read more

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Cutting delay impact

first_imgPLANNING: Atos Origin claims a 2% cut in train delays can expected from the roll-out of its Integrale software, which predicts the outcome of action which could be taken in response to incidents disrupting services.Integrale links information from train operators with real-time train running data to supply fact-based decision criteria. It can look ahead to the next rostered turn for the rolling stock and crew, taking into account the need for refuelling and servicing. It can also match up train crew rosters and route knowledge if services are diverted or retimed, and will predict how many passengers could be left stranded by missing a connection, allowing decision makers to take the most appropriate course of action. Operators and infrastructure mangers can make multiple collaborative edits to a day’s timetable, so services can be re-planned around affected trains.last_img read more

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DB Schenker Polska places largest Vectron order

first_imgPOLAND: Siemens announced on December 5 that it had received an order to supply 23 Vectron electric locomotives to freight operator DB Schenker Rail Polska SA. According to the manufacturer, ‘this is the largest order that Siemens has received so far’ for its modular Vectron family.‘This is already the third order for our newly-developed locomotive platform’, said Joachen Eickholt, CEO of the Rail Systems Division at Siemens. ‘A particularly pleasing aspect is that we were also able to secure an option for a further 13 locomotives.’The value of the order is, according to Siemens, ‘in the high double-digit million range’. The locomotives will be equipped for operation under 3 kV DC only. Under the contract, DB Schenker Rail Polska will be able to order spares by internet for delivery within 24 h, ‘thus ensuring a high level of availability at the customer’s depot’.Deliveries of the new locomotives were due to commence ‘immediately’ for completion by 2015. The Vectron received certification for operation on the Polish network in September 2012.last_img read more

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Zambia president orders military to help fight cholera spread

first_imgZambian President Edgar Lungu reacts after participating in a discussion at the World Economic Forum on Africa 2017. Reuters/Rogan Ward Zambian President Edgar Lungu reacts after participating in a discussion at the World Economic Forum on Africa 2017. Reuters/Rogan WardZambian President Edgar Lungu has directed the military to help fight the spread of cholera, which has killed 41 people in the nation’s capital and made more than 1,500 others sick since late September.The outbreak began on September 28 but appeared to die down by October 20, with fewer than five patients reported weekly until November 5. The number of cases then surged, with 136 in the week beginning November 26, the World Health Organisation reported.Presidential spokesman Amos Chanda said in a statement late on Friday that the President believed emergency measures were needed to contain the waterborne disease, including the closure of some markets.The outbreak was initially confined to densely populated parts of Lusaka where poor sanitation can aid its transmission, but the disease had now spread to low density areas, Chanda said.“The president is deeply concerned at rampaging advance of the epidemic and has therefore called on the defense forces to join other stakeholders […] and thoroughly clean up Lusaka,” Chanda said.The outbreak was initially linked to contaminated water from shallow wells but investigations revealed that the spread was being propagated through contaminated food, he said.“In the last two weeks, three traders from Soweto market have died from cholera and 18 are currently under admission in cholera treatment centers,” Chanda said, referring to Zambia’s largest market.Chanda said all markets, bars, restaurants and other public places that pose a risk of further transmission of cholera would be closed until they met hygiene standards.Cholera is spread by ingesting fecal matter and causes acute watery diarrhea. It can be treated with oral rehydration solution but the disease spreads rapidly and can kill within hours if not treated.last_img read more

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Hundreds gather to watch court challenge to Zimbabwe vote

first_imgSupporters of the opposition Movement for Democratic Change party (MDC) of Nelson Chamisa remove an election banner with the face of Zimbabwe’s President Emmerson Mnangagwa in Harare, Zimbabwe, August 1, 2018. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko Hundreds gathered around screens outside Zimbabwe’s top court on Wednesday to watch a legal showdown between President Emmerson Mnangagwa and the opposition leader challenging his July 30 election victory.Supporters of the opposition Movement for Democratic Change party (MDC) of Nelson Chamisa remove an election banner with the face of Zimbabwe’s President Emmerson Mnangagwa in Harare, Zimbabwe, August 1, 2018. REUTERS/Siphiwe SibekoHundreds of thousands more turned on their televisions to follow live footage of the Constitutional Court considering Nelson Chamisa’s petition that the vote was flawed and should be overturned.Riot police blocked roads leading to the court in the capital Harare and vehicles carrying water cannon parked nearby.Chamisa, 40, says the first vote since the removal of Robert Mugabe in November was rigged by a biased electoral commission. The Zimbabwe Electoral Commission (ZEC) and Mnangagwa say there was no foul play.The nine judges could throw the case out, declare a new winner or order a fresh election within 60 days.Wednesday’s hearing has been cast as a major test of the independence of the highest court whose verdict is final.“The jurisprudential and political burden that weighs heavily on the shoulders of each of the Constitutional Court judges today is that they are about to adjudicate by far the most important case of their legal careers,” Welshman Ncube, a Chamisa ally and constitutional lawyer wrote on Twitter.Before the hearing started at around 10 a.m. (0800 GMT), Chamisa’s lawyers accused Zimbabwe’s Justice Minister Ziyambi Ziyambi of refusing to issue temporary work permits to three South African members of their team.The judges let the three keep working in the team in court. Ziyambi declined to comment when contacted by Reuters.The election had been expected to end Zimbabwe’s pariah status and launch an economic recovery, but post-vote unrest has left the country deeply divided and brought back uncomfortable reminders of its violent past.Mnangagwa has urged Zimbabwe to unite behind him but questions remain over the death of six people in an army crackdown on protests against the ruling party’s victory.Chamisa earlier this week said the high stakes court case was only one of the many routes he would take “to protect the people’s vote” and said if he lost, he would consider peaceful street protests against Mnangagwa.Related Zimbabwe court makes landmark inheritance ruling Zimbabwe’s opposition to challenge presidential election result in courtcenter_img Zambia court throws out election result challengelast_img read more

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Burundi arrests local administrators for robbing residents

first_imgLocal teacher helps spread Chinese language in Burundi Burundi arrests over 100 alleged rebel movement supporters Burundi arrests dozens in currency market crackdowncenter_img Police in Burundi have arrested 12 people, including local administrators, on charges of robbing residents returning from neighbouring Tanzania, a police spokesman said.The arrests in southern Makamba province took place two days after security minister Gervais Ndirakobuca warned police and administration officials against engaging in bribery and other corrupt practices.Police spokesman Pierre Nkurikiye said the 12 arrested included three administration officials he said had robbed citizens of their money after they returned from working in Tanzania.“They stripped their victims of their belongings and money. And those who escaped paid exorbitant amounts of money as transportation fees to reach their home villages,” he said in comments aired on state television.Burundi’s new president, Evariste Ndayishimiye, took office last month promising to unite the country and uphold citizens’ rights.Rights groups have accused local administrators, security services and the youth wing of the ruling party of torture, gang-rape and murder of political opponents.The government has dismissed the accusations.Relatedlast_img read more

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