Category: fufditohscol

Scientists tackle our addiction to salt and fat by altering foods’ pore size, number

first_imgPinterest Share Share on Facebook Regarding salt, Lee said, “Six in 10 American adults either have high blood pressure or are on the borderline of this diagnosis largely because they eat too much salt. Overconsuming salt is also associated with the development and severity of cardiovascular and bone diseases, kidney stones, gastric cancer, and asthma.”Because 70 percent of the salt Americans consume comes from processed foods, Lee began to study the relationship between the microstructural properties of these foods and the way salt is released when it is chewed.“Much of the salt that is added to these foods is not released in our mouths where we can taste it, and that means the rest of the salt is wasted,” he said. “We wanted to alter porosity in processed food, targeting a certain fat-protein emulsion structure, to see if we could get more of the salt released during chewing. Then food manufacturers won’t have to add as much salt as before, but the consumer will taste almost the same amount of saltiness.”Increasing porosity also changed the way the foods broke apart when they were chewed, exposing more surface area and increasing saltiness, he said.“When foods crumble easily, we further reduce the amount of salt that is needed. Changing the number or size of pores in the food’s surface can help us to accomplish this,” he said.Takhar said that his porous media approach to understanding the behavior of water, oil, and gas during frying will help create strategies that optimize the frying process, reduce oil uptake, and produce lower-fat foods.The articles Takhar publishes in academic journals feature page after page of complex mathematical equations that describe the physics involved in the transport of fluids and in textural changes in foods. These equations then guide the simulations that he performs in his laboratory.“Frying is such a complicated process involving more than 100 equations. In a matter of seconds, when you put the food in the fryer, water starts evaporating, vapors form and escape the surface, oil penetration starts, and heat begins to rise while at the same time there’s evaporative cooling off at different points in the food. Some polymers in the food matrix may also change their state, and chemical reactions can occur. It’s not an easy set of changes to describe,” he said.Within 40 seconds of frying, the texture of gently fried processed foods like crackers is fully developed, the scientist said. “That’s the cracker’s peak texture. Any longer and you’re just allowing more oil to penetrate the food.“A lot of frying research has focused on capillary pressure in the oil phase of the process, but we have found that capillary pressure in the water phase also critically affects oil uptake,” Takhar said.Capillary pressure makes overall pore pressure negative, and that negative pressure tends to suck oil from inside. His simulations show when that pressure is becoming more negative.“The trick is to stop when pore pressure is still positive (or less negative)–that is, when oil has had less penetration. Of course, other variables such as moisture level, texture, taste, and structure formation, must be monitored as well. It’s an optimization problem,” he noted.When this exquisite balance is achieved, lower-fat, healthier fried foods are the result, he added. LinkedIncenter_img Two University of Illinois food scientists have learned that understanding and manipulating porosity during food manufacturing can affect a food’s health benefits.Youngsoo Lee reports that controlling the number and size of pores in processed foods allows manufacturers to use less salt while satisfying consumers’ taste buds. Pawan Takhar has found that meticulously managing pore pressure in foods during frying reduces oil uptake, which results in lower-fat snacks without sacrificing our predilection for fried foods’ texture and taste.Both scientists are experts in food engineering and professors in the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences’ Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition. Email Share on Twitterlast_img read more

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Expert panel begins review of WHO’s pandemic response

first_imgApr 12, 2010 (CIDRAP News) – A committee of experts appointed by the World Health Organization (WHO) convened today to begin evaluating the agency’s and the world’s response to the H1N1 influenza pandemic, with WHO Director-General Margaret Chan urging the group to pull no punches.”We want a frank and critical assessment,” Chan said in prepared remarks. “WHO is not defining or restricting the scope of specific issues that may arise. If our member states have questions or concerns, we want to hear those questions and concerns raised.”The start of the review comes almost a year after the novel H1N1 virus emerged and in the wake of considerable criticism that the WHO and many governments overreacted to the virus. Some critics have charged that the response was improperly influenced by drug companies hoping to profit from the epidemic—a charge that the WHO and public health authorities strongly reject.As the panel convened a 3-day meeting in Geneva, the WHO released the names of its 29 members, who the agency said are some of the leading experts in their fields and combine scientific expertise and public health experience. Numerous developed and developing countries are represented.At today’s opening session the group elected Harvey V. Fineberg, president of the Institute of Medicine in the US National Academy of Sciences, as chair, and Babatunde Osotimehin of the University of Ibadan, Nigeria, as vice chair, the WHO reported.The panel will review the pandemic response in the context of a broader examination of the functioning of the International Health Regulations (IHR). The regulations, designed to guide responses to potential international health threats, took effect in 2007 and are due for a review this year. The panel’s official name is the International Health Regulations Review Committee.On the basis of the committee’s findings, Chan will present an interim report to the World Health Assembly next month and a final report to the assembly in May 2011, the WHO said.The committee’s three stated goals are to review the functioning of the IHR; to assess the ongoing global response to the H1N1 pandemic, including the WHO’s role; and to identify lessons for improving preparedness for future pandemics and other emergencies.Dr. Keiji Fukuda, director of the WHO’s influenza program, told the committee today that the agency’s six-stage pandemic alert system caused confusion, since the H1N1 virus turned out to be far less deadly than the H5N1 avian flu virus, according to a Reuters report. The H5N1 virus had long been seen as the most likely cause of the next pandemic.”The reality is there is a huge amount of uncertainty [in a pandemic],” Fukuda said. “I think we did not convey the uncertainty. That was interpreted by many as a nontransparent process.”According to a Canadian Press report, Fukuda said the review committee will not second-guess the WHO’s decision last June to declare the H1N1 epidemic a pandemic. Given all the scientific and clinical information, “We have never had a moment’s doubt of whether this is a pandemic or not,” he said.Chan underlined this view in her remarks: “The pandemic’s spread was rapidly global,” she said, noting that 213 countries and territories have reported cases.The WHO’s declaration of the pandemic was controversial at the time as well as afterward. Because the idea of a pandemic was strongly associated with the H5N1 virus, many feared that declaring H1N1 a pandemic would cause undue fear. But the WHO said the pandemic declaration was not meant to convey anything about the severity of the illness, only that the virus was capable of spreading globally.The members of the review committee are not WHO staff members and are not paid by the WHO for their participation, the agency said. They were chosen from the roster of experts under the IHR structure or other WHO committees.Because the group is considered a WHO expert committee, the agency said, it must follow WHO regulations, which include rules designed to prevent conflicts of interest.”The Secretariat [of the WHO] has been especially vigilant in seeking out possible conflicts of interest among committee members,” Chan said in her speech.See also: Apr 12 WHO statement on the review procedurehttp://www.who.int/csr/disease/swineflu/frequently_asked_questions/review_committee/en/Text of Margaret Chan’s speech to the review committeehttp://www.who.int/dg/speeches/2010/ihr_20100412/en/index.htmlWHO review committee rosterhttp://www.who.int/ihr/r_c_members/en/index.htmllast_img read more

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TCHS: Public Lecture On White Sisters Legacy

first_imgShe serves on the board of the Historic Santa Fe Foundation, is vice president of the Historical Society of New Mexico, a member of the City of Santa Fe Public Safety Committee and a fellow of the Society for Applied Anthropology. The Historical Society of New Mexico is a 501c3 non-profit organization makes grants to local historical societies in the state to help their programs and to provide speakers for meetings. The Taos County Historical Society announces its 2 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 7, 2019 public lecture “The Legacy of El Delirio: The White Sisters’ Remarkable Legacy” presented by Nancy Owen Lewis, Scholar in Residence at School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe. The lecture is sponsored, in part, by the Historical Society of New Mexico and its Speaker’s Bureau. The program takes place in the Kit Carson Electric Cooperative Boardroom, 118 Cruz Alta Road in Taos. The talk is free and open to the public. Courtesy/TCHS They entertained numerous writers, such as Agatha Christie. Their enduring legacy, which includes Santa Fe’s first animal shelter as well as their estate – bequeathed in 1972 to the School for Advanced Research – is examined in their illustrated presentation by Nancy Owen Lewis. TCHS News:center_img Owen Lewis has a doctorate in anthropology from the University of Massachusetts and is a scholar-in-residence at the School for Advanced Research. She has conducted extensive research on the White sisters, as discussed in A Peculiar Alchemy: A Centennial History of SAR, co-authored with Kay Hagan (SAR Press). Her other publications include the award-winning Chasing the Cure in New Mexico: Tuberculosis and the Quest for Health (Museum of New Mexico Press). She has published five articles on the health seeker movement, including “High and Dry in New Mexico: Tuberculosis and the Quest for Health,” which received the 2013 Gilberto Espinosa Award from the New Mexico Historical Review. In the mid 1920’s, Elizabeth White and her younger sister Martha came from New York City to Santa Fe, where they built a fabulous estate called El Delirio or the Madness. It boasted a swimming pool and tennis courts, the first in Santa Fe, as well as a state-of-the-art kennel for their Irish wolfhounds and Afghans. Inspired by their education at Bryn Mawr College, the White sisters lobbied for the protection of Pueblo land, promoted Indian art and gave fabulous parties. Elizabeth White. Courtesy/TCHS photo Courtesy/TCHS The Taos County Historical Society is a 501c3 non-profit organization with a purpose “…preserving the history of the Taos area…”. For additional information on membership in the society, visit www.taoscountyhistoricalsociety.org.last_img read more

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Can Smithfield project revive Stoke-on-Trent’s fortunes?

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Hamptons Trunk Show

first_imgThe UJA-Federation of New York is committed to solving pressing problems faced by the community, with over 50,000 donors who pool their resources. It’s been bringing the Jewish community together for 100 years, responding to crises at home, in Israel, and nearly 70 other countries.According to the UJA-Federation of New York website, it’s the world’s largest local philanthropy. Together with hundreds of nonprofits, UJA touches the lives of 4.5 million people each year. Since 2007, the UJA invested more than $81 million in urgent relief to those affected, with 30 relief missions for Hurricane Irma and Maria in Puerto Rico, the Caribbean, and Houston. It additionally distributed $1.6 million in disaster relief funds and hand-delivered $4 million worth of donated humanitarian supplies.The 2018 report reads 9.6 million meals were served in NY; 577,000 elderly cared for in NY, Israel, and the former Soviet Union; 16,000 kids across the state participated in Jewish summer camp; 440,000 mental health counseling sessions were provided in NY; 17,000 local college students stayed connected to the Jewish community through 15 campus Hillels; and 100,000 New Yorkers received free legal services.Adrienne Tanner, executive director of UJA Women at UJA-Federation of NY, said, “We’re responding to rising anti-Semitism here in New York by ensuring security enhancements for Jewish organizations and synagogues throughout local communities.”All of this generosity is compounded with a new angle, fashion. On Thursday, August 1, from 10 AM to 4 PM, the UJA-Federation of NY will host the annual Hamptons Trunk Show at Bridgehampton Historical Society. The trunk show began 13 years ago in a private home with only seven vendors. It has since grown to include over 60 vendors and nearing 1000 people in attendance.“We love working with designers who share our passion for philanthropy and our mission to care for those in need. Aligning ourselves with generous yet hugely talented designers who our guests will enjoy is a great synergy,” said Tammy Brass, director of UJA Women at UJA-Federation of NY.Returning names include Jennifer Miller, Lissa Fine Jewelry, and Jodi Rose. New vendors this year expected to be a big hit include Modern Wick, Ever After, and Tenet. It’s a place for designer clothing, jewelry, accessories, and home decor surrounded by music, refreshments, and all in a tented outdoor space.Tanner continued, “The fashion industry in general has been a tremendous supporter of UJA, hosting private events and engaging with our work to help Holocaust survivors and help send kids to Jewish camp. The trunk show combines the best of fashion and philanthropy by exposing designers to UJA supporters and using a portion of proceeds to help people in need.”Twenty percent of proceeds of all sales benefit the UJA-Federation of NY. The event is rain or shine. Bridgehampton Historical Society is located at 2368 Montauk Highway. Registration at the door is $60, $30 of which is tax-deductible.The UJA’s next event scheduled is Supplies for Success on August 22 at the Bridgehampton Community House, where hundreds of volunteers will fill new backpacks with school supplies for low-income children on the East End. Anyone interested in learning more can email suppliesforsuccess@ujafedny.org. For more information on how to donate or volunteer, visit www.ujafedny.org.nicole@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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Chesterfield Special Cylinders

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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Russia and Baltics Port Expansion Summit Approaches

first_imgThe expansion and upgrade of Russian as well as Baltic ports will play a vital role in the future development and improved trade of the region.With many expansion projects going on the region, the Russian and Baltics region sees huge potential for investors and suppliers. Investment figures of up to RUB 26 billion have been published.The Russia and Baltics Port Expansion Summit (5th and 6th December 2013, Saint Petersburg) will bring together government officials, port and transport authorities, associations, logistics providers, investors, consultants and industry experts to discuss the current status and future direction of the ports industry in Russia and the Baltics region.Major issues to be addressed at the 2013 event are:– Outlook of the ports sector: future opportunities and projects;– Guaranteeing investments and funding;– Introduction to the Russian and Baltics market : How to nagivate through the market;– Dealing with complex rules and legal requirements;– Import regulations and custom clearances explained;– Tackling protection mechanisms holding back international sales;– Improving the efficiency of port operations and vessel management;– Planning capacity increase;– Introducing new port technology.More info[mappress]Press Release, November 13, 2013last_img read more

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How low can you go?

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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Mipim blog: Do Scotland’s cities get the profile they deserve?

first_imgAt the time of writing there are 47 delegates listed as attending Mipim from Scotland of which more than half are exhibitors. By contrast Manchester has 174 delegates of which 149 are exhibitors. So are the Scottish cities competing well enough on the world stage, post referendum and during the new city devolution debate? It seems that everywhere we look the city agenda is centre stage. For example BCO has just announced its programme for Chicago 2015 and again cities are to the fore. How does all this sit with the Scottish Cities Alliance which states on its website “Cities are revealed by study after study as being the key to driving economic growth”?The Scottish Cities Alliance is once again featuring this year at Mipim after an inaugural visit last year and a strong presence at Mipim UK in London in October. Scotland appears to have finally got rid of the Tunnock’s Caramel Wafers and Shortbread to entice delegates during previous attempts at Mipim. This was replaced last year with a fresh new approach but is the Scottish property industry supporting it enough? The number of delegates would suggest not. The other key player in this debate is the Core Cities Group. It represents the councils of England’s eight largest city economies outside London along with Glasgow and Cardiff. Their statement is that “these cities drive local and underpin national economies”. This group is really pressing the city agenda. Scotland appears to have finally got rid of the Tunnock’s Caramel Wafers and Shortbread to entice delegates during previous attempts at MipimAt the recent Core Cities UK Devolution Summit in Glasgow it is clear the debate is gathering real momentum. This debate is being fuelled by a desire to have some form of fiscal autonomy among the core Cities Group. Their proposals are covered in a report “Restoring Britain’s City States”. The iquestion now is: how fast can this happen? In our Glasgow office we are seeing staff travelling from the smaller cities such as Perth and Stirling to find employment. Is this just a micro map of the real issue in the UK economy that it is still centred on London. We have to find ways of generating places in these cities that populations want to live and work in. All of the cities outside of London offer greater work life balances that cannot be achieved in London. This in an era where it is nearly impossible to step onto the London property market ladder and yet the ability to function in a plethora of careers through technology now exists. So Scotland and perhaps the regional cities need to try even harder at Mipim.And one last word for the Scottish Cities Alliance… Please do not drop the IRN BRU.  It is still an essential requirement for Mipim as the best hangover cure.Richard Blair is a board member at AHR, and works between Glasgow, Manchester and Londonlast_img read more

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LOC opens in Mumbai

first_imgLocated in the district of Vile Parle East, the new office is close to Mumbai’s international and domestic airports, as well as many of LOC’s key shipping and energy clients.Paul Miles, regional head of the Middle East, India and Caspian for the LOC Group, and Mark Lomas, director of LOC Middle East and India, will oversee the management of LOC Mumbai during the initial stages.LOC has also recruited marine engineer Rohan Murray and Valentine Dias as a marine consultant.”LOC has been very active in India for a number of years and we are very optimistic that this office will grow in the current expanding market,” said Miles.www.loc-group.comlast_img read more

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