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Donegal woman bags €52,000 on Winning Streak

first_imgA Donegal-based businesswoman got the chance of a lifetime to spin the wheel on RTE’s Winning Streak last Saturday– to win a whopping  €52,000!Getting to spin the famous wheel on the Winning Streak game show never came into the mind of Annmarie Doherty, who lives in Greencastle, Co. Donegal – it was enough for her to just appear on the show.  But the Derry native won a massive €30,000 on the wheel to add to the €22,000 in cash she won earlier in the show.Annmarie plans to buy a new car with her winnings as her old one recently failed the NCT. She said she will also treat her husband, Michael, who will soon be turning 50, and their twin boys Finn and Loughlin (14). Annmarie Doherty from Greencastle, Co. Donegal, pictured at the presentation of the Winning Streak winners’ cheques with Marty Whelan, Winning Streak game show co-host; Annmarie Doherty, the winning player; Niall Andrews, Head of Sales and Operations at the National Lottery and Sinead Kennedy, Winning Streak game show co-host. Pic: Mac Innes Photography.Leading up to the programme, Annmarie was a mixed bag of nerves and excitement. Annmarie picked up her winning ticket from GALA Express, Drung, Quigley’s Point, Co. Donegal.She said she was overwhelmed by the many well-wishers in her community and the number of texts and messages from far and wide wishing her luck.Annmarie told hosts Marty Whelan and Sinead Kennedy how she and Michael were childhood sweethearts who lost touch. But they reconnected in their twenties when they were living and studying in Trinity College in Dublin where Michael was studying Computer Science and Annmarie Business and Economics. Annmarie also has a Master’s Degree in Woman Studies from UCD.The couple, now married for 25 years, have pooled their expertise and run their own business a   Motarme –  a business-to-business technology marketing firm. Before that Annemarie worked for a range of Chambers of Commerce and also in marketing and public relations for Local Enterprise Boards. She was also the former President of the Donegal Women in Business Network. A grand total of €184,000 was won on this week’s episode of the Winning Streak National Lottery game show.Donegal woman bags €52,000 on Winning Streak was last modified: January 14th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Enjoy Independence Day Holiday: No Weekly Web Design and Development News Roundup

first_imgI’m enjoying the Independence Day holiday this week with my family, so there is no weekly roundup of web design and development news.I’ll be back next week with my curated list of the latest news.To stay current on what’s happening, I suggest you check out this week’s Web Design Update by Laura Carlson. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Like this:Like Loading…RelatedEnjoy Thanksgiving Holiday: No Weekly Web Design and Development News RoundupI’m enjoying the Thanksgiving holiday this week with my family, so there is no weekly roundup of web design and development news. I’ll be back next week with my curated list of the latest news. To stay current on what’s happening, I suggest you check out this week’s Web Design…In “Web design & development links”Enjoy Your Thanksgiving Holiday: No Weekly Web Design and Development News RoundupDue to the Thanksgiving holiday, there is no weekly web design and development roundup this week. To stay current on what’s happening, check out Laura Carlson’s weekly web design update.In “Web design & development links”Enjoy Thanksgiving Holiday: No Weekly Web Design and Development News Roundup  There is no weekly roundup of web design and development news this week. I’m taking a break and enjoying the U.S. Thanksgiving celebration with my family and friends. Come back next week for my curated list of the latest web design and development news. To stay current on what’s…In “Web design & development links”last_img read more

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Creativity brings economic growth

first_imgPerformance art in South Africa is burgeoning.(Image: African Creative Economy Conference)MEDIA CONTACTS • Kim Peters Congress Secretariat+27 21 674 0013.• Judy Bryant Media Liaison, Judy Bryant Communications+27 83 286 7168.Lorraine KearneyThe creative industries are among the most rapidly expanding sectors across the globe. According to the United Nation’s (UN) Conference on Trade and Development (Unctad), the sector has a growth rate of 13.9% in Africa, beaten only by the Middle East, where the rate is 17.6%. By contrast, North and Central America post a growth rate of just 4.3%.And in 2011, the world export of creative goods reached $441-billion (R4405-billion). These figures were bandied about at the African Creative Economy Conference (ACEC), being held at the Cape Town City Hall from 7 to 10 October. The second day of the conference was given over to discussions on culture and sustainable development, with particular reference to the Millennium Development Goals and the Post-2015 Development Framework.The ACEC intention is to unlock the continent’s creative industries’ potential and leapfrog into emerging high-growth sectors of the world economy, say the organisers. Africa’s share of the global creative economy is currently less than 1%, and in 2011 its arts exports was just $2.2-billion (R219-billion). North Africa has the best performance in terms of exports, led by Egypt, followed by southern Africa, led by South Africa. These exports are predominantly design, followed by arts and crafts, and publishing.“Culture has huge potential for growth and jobs,” said Nils Jansons, the deputy head of the European Union (EU) delegation to South Africa. “It is the beginning and end of development. It is important to social fabric and it enhances self-esteem, improves dialogue and a sense of community and belonging. It helps fight fanaticism and xenophobia.”It could contribute, he emphasised, to poverty reduction. The EU promoted the conservation of cultural diversity and had earmarked $200-million (R2-billion) for arts and freedom of expression in Africa. In South Africa, in particular, it was working on research with Arterial Network on gathering data on trade in cultural goods and services.Millennium Development GoalsThe euro zone promoted culture as a contributor to achieving the Millennium Development Goals, and in the post-2015 framework it wanted to include culture as necessary for good governance and building growing, inclusive and sustainable societies.Carolina Quintana, the networking and partnerships officer at Unctad, pointed out that post-2015 the world needed a new people – and a planet-sensitive agenda. “We must design new products, adapt what exists, improve eco-efficiencies. The creative industries are well-placed to be a part of this as some of the most dynamic sectors in the global economy.”The United Nation’s Conference on Trade and Development was actively promoting the creative economy, particularly in Africa, as it had high levels of talent and creativity that could be tapped for economic growth, poverty reduction, economic diversity and job creation. Driving this growth were global demand, technology and tourism. However, Quintana and several other speakers pointed out that a crucial element for the creative economy to flourish was the protection of intellectual property rights.Also key to driving the creative economy were intellectual property rights and technology, and the protection and promotion of cultural diversity, said Rochelle Roca Hachem, a programme officer in the section on the diversity of cultural expressions at Unesco, the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, which had seven internationally binding cultural agreements. The most important of these was the 2005 Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions. There were 172 parties to this, 70% of which were in Africa.Promoting growthThe UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization had two tracks for promoting the creative economy worldwide: funding and technical assistance, which included a ‘train the trainer’ programme, through which 32 people from 25 African countries were being trained and will help their own and other countries with policy development.Its International Fund for Cultural Diversity had 61 beneficiaries in 40 developing countries to bring change through capacity building, business models, partnership and policy development. The organisation’s goals were to strengthen governance for culture in developing countries and establish legal and institutional frameworks and policies for national cultural sectors.The third Unesco creative economy report, Widening Development Pathways, would be published on 14 November in Paris. It would focus on the creative economy at a local level, specifically in developing nations, and at how the creative economy could be practically promoted on the ground.In addition to money, the creative industries promote diversity, esteem, community, social cohesion, identity, individuality and the possibility for exchange. But the obstacles to its growth include lack of capital, entrepreneurial skills and infrastructure.Voice of dissent“The African creative economy does not exist,” said Christiaan de Beukelaer, a PhD researcher from the United Kingdom’s University of Leeds. “This is not because there is no cultural production, but because there is no conceptual clarity.” De Beukelaer’s research focuses primarily on the role of culture and cultural industries in international development. He has spent the past eight months in West Africa researching in the field.There was universal agreement on the growth potential of the creative economy, but some dissent on the necessary preconditions to drive it in Africa. De Beukelaer said it was difficult to create a cultural capital. Cities that had traditionally been strong in the sector retained these positions. “If there was consensus on what these preconditions were, we would be implementing them, not talking about them,” he said.For Jansons, it was more an issue of access to financial resources and the right, flexible education. Hachem echoed his words, speaking about the importance of arts education, access to finance, and better infrastructure. “But in Africa, there are such vast differences between places that there is not one single answer.”Links with science, technology and innovation were crucial. Culture was the source of creativity and innovation, she said. Quintana added that the creative economy was a process in the making. Africa had assets in terms of high levels of talent and creativity. It needed to harness technology to get this to a wider market. In its favour was its young population: young people would be more influenced by technology and so were important in developing a creative economy on the continent.The conferenceThe ACEC brings together some of the continent’s leading thinkers, academics, cultural producers, and experts in music, dance, theatre, visual arts, heritage and museums, design, fashion, craft, festivals and cultural events, film, literature, and stand-up comedy. It also attracts entrepreneurs, politicians and funders whose interests lie in expanding the creative economies across the continent. The conference focuses on the creative industries not just as economic drivers, but also considers how the creative sectors can eradicate poverty. The conference takes place each year in a different city. In 2013, more than 300 delegates from about 40 countries participated in Cape Town, South Africa.last_img read more

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Yahoo! Plans a Run at YouTube

first_imgOm Malik, writing for NewTeeVee late last night, was not sold on the idea of Yahoo! bolstering its video destination.” Look at YouTube‚Äôs history: it became popular because from the very beginning it didn‚Äôt try to be a destination, using viral distribution to get traction. Even today, people‚Äôs perception of YouTube is that it is not a destination. So far, video destination sites have not been a success.Look at it another way, Google tried to compete with YouTube with a strategy similar to Yahoo‚Äôs plan. It didn‚Äôt work, and they had to buy YouTube.”Om also wasn’t sold on the idea of adding video to Flickr. I’m not so sure that’s a good idea either. Flickr has been talking about adding video for almost 3 years now, but so far it hasn’t happened. My guess is the reason they haven’t pulled the trigger on video is that they aren’t sold internally on the idea. Flickr has a reputation as a high end photography site; one that attracts artistic photos more than vacation snapshots. That rep took a ding when Yahoo! began closing their Photos property a couple of months ago and encouraged users to migrate to Flickr (though killing off the overlap was something Yahoo! had to do, and I think they made the right choice to keep Flickr). Adding video might just tarnish Flickr further.That said, Yahoo! does own some pretty compelling video tools, namely Jumpcut. Jumpcut is a best of breed online video editor which could be integrated into a video offering letting people not only post and respond to video blogs, but also edit and remix them directly on the site. That’s something that YouTube is dabbling in with their Remixer app, but Jumpcut is currently a far superior offering.What do you think? Can Yahoo! make a legitimate run at YouTube or will their efforts be dead on arrival? Leave your thoughts below. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts Tags:#news#web A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… josh catone 1 A report yesterday from Bloomberg says that Yahoo! is planning to revamp its online video offering by year’s end in an effort to compete with YouTube and MySpace TV. According to comScore, Yahoo! is actually third in the US in terms of total video streams, though their 4.6% market share is well off the pace set by Google (mostly via YouTube), which soundly dominates the online video space, serving more than 4.5 times as many videos each month as Yahoo!.Ari Levy at Bloomberg reports that Yahoo! plans to beef up its video offering with more content from media partners as well as users. Yahoo! also plans to add video to its popular photo sharing property, Flickr. “One of our strategies is to put video everywhere you are on the Internet,” Yahoo!’s general manager for video, Mike Folgner, told Bloomberg. “We’re going to build a much better destination for you to access all this different content.”Yahoo! already has deals in place with some compelling content partners including the Universal Music Group, and the EMI Group, as well as the Associated Press, CNN, Major League Baseball and the National Football League. These sort of major content deals can certainly help bring in the eyeballs — epsecially if any of them are exclusive deals — but what made YouTube a success was really the user generated video. Clips from television shows (especially late-night US comedies like the Daily Show, South Park, or Saturday Night Live) certainly drove a fair amount of YouTube traffic, but it was the ability for the site to turn anyone into a star and give ordinary people an outlet to share ideas, opinions, rants and converse with one another that truly made the site a success in my opinion. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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Why Facebook’s Data Sharing Matters

first_imgWe, ok I, have long argued here at ReadWriteWeb that aggregate analysis of Facebook data is an idea with world-changing potential. The analogy from history that I think of is about Real estate Redlining. Back in the middle of the last century, when US Census data and housing mortgage loan data were both made available for computer analysis and cross referencing for the first time, early data scientists were able to prove a pattern of racial discrimination by banks against people of color who wanted to buy houses in certain neighborhoods. The data illuminated the problem and made it undeniable, thus leading to legislation to prohibit such discrimination.I believe that there are probably patterns of interaction and communication of comparable historic importance that could be illuminated by effective analysis of Facebook user data. Good news and bad news could no doubt be found there, if critical thinking eyes could take a look.“Assuming you had permission, you could use a semantic tool to investigate what issues the users are discussing, what weight those issues have in relation to everything else they are saying and get some insights into the relationships between those issues,” writes systemic innovation researcher Haydn Shaughnessy in a comment on Forbes privacy writer Kashmir Hill’s coverage of the Politico deal. “As far as I can see people use sentiment analysis because it is low overhead; the quickest, cheapest way to reflect something of the viewpoints, however fallible the technique. Properly mined though you could really understand what those demographics care about.” Several years ago I had the privilege to sit with Mark Zuckerberg and make this argument to him, but it doesn’t feel like the company has seized the world-changing opportunity in front of it.Facebook does regularly analyzes its own data of course. And sometimes it publishes what it finds. For example, two years ago the company cross referenced the body of its users’ names with US Census data that tied last names and ethnicity. Facebook’s conclusion was that the site used to be disproportionately made up of White people – but now it’s as ethnically diverse as the rest of America. Good news! But why do we only hear the good news? That millions of people are talking about Republican Presidential candidates might be considered bad news, but the new deal remains a very limited instance of Facebook treating its user data like the platform that it could be.It could be just a sign of what’s to come, though. “This is especially interesting in terms of the business relationships–who’s allowed to analyze Facebook data across all users?” asks Nathan Gilliatt, principal at research firm Social Target and co-founder of AnalyticsCamp. “To my knowledge, they haven’t let other companies analyze user data beyond publicly shared stuff and what people can access with their own accounts’ authorization. This says to me that Facebook understands the value of that data. It will be interesting to see what else they do with it.”I’ve been told that Facebook used to let tech giant HP informally hack at their data years ago, back when the site was small and the world’s tech privacy lawyers were as yet unaroused. That kind of arrangement would have been unheard of for the past several years, though. Two years ago, social graph hacker Pete Warden pulled down Facebook data from hundreds of millions of users, analyzing it for interesting connections before planning on releasing it to the academic research community. Facebook’s response was assertive and came from the legal department. Warden decided not to give the data to researchers after all. (Disclosure: I am writing this post from Warden’s couch.)“Like a lot of Facebook’s studies, this collaboration with Politico is fascinating research, it’s just a real shame they can’t make the data publicly available, largely due to privacy concerns” bemoans Warden. “Without reproducability, it loses a lot of its scientific impact. With a traditional opinion poll, anyone with enough money can call up a similar number of people and test a survey’s conclusions. That’s not the case with Facebook data.”“Everyone is going ‘gaga’ over the potential for Facebook,” says Kaliya Hamlin, Executive Director of a trade and advocacy group called the Personal Data Ecosystem Consortium. “The potential exists only because they have this massive lead (monopoly) so it seems like they should be the ones to do this.“Yes we should be doing deeper sentiment analysis of peoples’ real opinions. But in a way that they are choosing to participate – so that the entities that aggregate such information are trusted and accountable.“If I had my own personal data store/service and I chose to share say my music listening habits with a ratings service like Neilson – voluntarily join a panel. I have full trust and confidence that they are not going to turn on me and do something else with my data – it will just go in a pool.“Next thing you know Facebook is going to be selling to the candidate the ability to access people who make positive or negative comments in private messages. Where does it end? How are they accountable and how do we have choice?”Not everyone is as concerned about this from a privacy perspective. “There are many things in the online world that give me willies for Fourth-Amendment-like reasons,” says Curt Monash of data analyst firm Monash Research. “This isn’t one of them, because the data collectors and users aren’t proposing to even come close to singling out individual people for surveillance.”Monash’s primary concern is in the quality of the data. “There’s a limit as to how useful this can be,” he says. “Online polls and similar popularity contests are rife with what amounts to ballot box stuffing. This will be just another example. It is regrettable that you can now stuff an online ballot box by spamming your friends in private conversation.”It doesn’t just have to be about messages, though. Social connections, Likes and more all offer a lot of potential for analysis, if it’s done appropriately.“We need trust and accountability frameworks that work for people to allow analysis AND not allow creepiness,” says Hamlin.Two years ago social news site Reddit began giving its users an option to “donate your data to science” by opting in to have activity data made available for download. Massive programming Question and Answer site StackOverflow has long made available periodic dumps of its users’ data for analysis. “You never know what’s going to come out of it,” StackOverflow co-founder Joel Spolsky says about analysis of aggregate user data.The unknown potential is indicitive not just of how valuable Facebook data is, but potentially of the relationship between data and knowledge generally in the emerging data-rich world.That’s the thesis of author David Weinberger’s new book, Too Big to Know. “It’s not simply that there are too many brickfacts [datapoints] and not enough edifice-theories,” he writes. “Rather, the creation of data galaxies has led us to science that sometimes is too rich and complex for reduction into theories. As science has gotten too big to know, we’ve adopted different ideas about what it means to know at all.”The world’s largest social network, rich with far more signal than any of us could wrap our heads around, could help illuminate emergent qualities of the human experience that are only visible on the network level.Please don’t mess up our chance to learn those things, Mr. Zuckerberg. marshall kirkpatrick 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts Tags:#Analysis#Data Services#web A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Facebook has cut a deal with political website Politico that allows the independent site machine-access to Facebook users’ messages, both public and private, when a Republican Presidential candidate is mentioned by name. The data is being collected and analyzed for sentiment by Facebook’s data team, then delivered to Politico to serve as the basis of data-driven political analysis and journalism.The move is being widely condemned in the press as a violation of privacy but if Facebook would do this right, it could be a huge win for everyone. Facebook could be the biggest, most dynamic census of human opinion and interaction in history. Unfortunately, failure to talk prominently about privacy protections, failure to make this opt-in (or even opt out!) and the inclusion of private messages are all things that put at risk any remaining shreds of trust in Facebook that could have served as the foundation of a new era of social self-awareness.last_img read more

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