Month: July 2019

Restaurant Review New Taste for an Ancient Cuisine

first_img Tags: restaurant reviews Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0% Photo by Maria C. AscarrunzSome of the typical flavorings used in Ethopian cooking are berbere – a chili powder with spices, and niter kibbeh – a spiced, clarified butter. Unlike my previous experiences, I found each dish we had here deliciously distinct from each other, even while sharing similar spicing.On our first visit, the BF tried the 2-meat, 1-veg combo. There are a variety of options to choose from, and to my absolute shock, one of the meats he chose was the lamb – Lamb Tsebhi Begee (Beg Wat) described as “tender lamb with bones, cooked with hot pepper and seasoning.” The BF does not like lamb, normally, but in the spirit of trying something not in his wheelhouse, he went for it. We both loved it. A Wat is a stew that can be made with a variety of meats and vegetables. An unusual bit of cooking trivia I learned: the stew starts out by cooking chopped onions in a dry pot with no fat, until most of the moisture has left them. Only then is fat added (niter kibbeh) and the onions are further sautéed until they almost melt, adding thickness to the stew.Photo by Maria C. AscarrunzAll three of our meats came on one plate on a layer of injera.The other meat the BF selected was Zigini, another Wat, but with beef this time, in a spicy sauce. Personally, I didn’t love his beef, especially in comparison to the lamb, although he liked it just fine. For his veg option, he got the split peas (Ater – yet another Wat!) pictured above. There are at least as many vegetarian options on the menu as there are meat dishes, so this is a good place for a mixed crowd.For my meal, I had the Gored Gored (pictured above on the left), which is considered to be one of Ethiopia’s national dishes, and consists of chunks of medium rare beef seasoned with niter kibbeh. It was a buttery, super flavorful dish of meaty goodness, a bit spicy, and served with cooling yogurt. The beef had a wonderful springiness but was not too underdone for the BF’s taste (me, I could have eaten it raw.) Up to this point, that beef was my favorite dish.For my side dish, I went with Azifa – lentils – a huge dish of them, spiked with jalapenos, spicy and intensely lemony – which came with a large portion of salad. If I was a vegetarian, this dish would make a lot of appearances at my table.Photo by Maria C. AscarrunzI had a glass of the famed Tej – a sweet, fermented honey wine, similar to mead. I usually don’t like sweet wines with food, but this had a nice balance between sweet and tang, and went perfectly with the food.Photo by Maria C. AscarrunzThe BF had a St. George lager, brewed in Ethiopia.On our second visit, I had yet another dish of undercooked beef, but this time I opted for the raw, and it was by far my favorite dish. Kitfo is raw minced beef, seasoned with hot spiced butter (which may cook it a little bit, if you’re leery of so much rawness), with top notes of perfume-y cardamom, and served with a wonderful cottage cheese – which is incredibly light, fresh and tangy, more like the Mexican queso fresco so abundant here in the Mission. It’s made in-house with buttermilk, and was a perfect contrast to the spicy beef. My Kitfo was mixed with Hamili, collared greens, as well, so I’d really already had my full complement of veggies, but my dish came with a serving of stewed carrots, potatoes and cabbage (Yatakelt Kilikili), which was rather bland to my taste. No matter, the beef’s extraordinary flavor more than made up for it.Photo by Maria C. AscarrunzThe BF went with two chicken dishes this time, and they were as different as could be from each other. The first, Doro Wat, is one of the most well-known dishes in Ethiopian cooking. This version came with drumsticks in a wonderful , deep red sauce which we sopped up with plenty of injera. His other chicken dish, Doro Tibs, was merely described as sautéed chicken pieces with fresh tomatoes and onions. The chicken was tender, and flavored with mitmita, an Ethiopian chili powder, and the assertive flavor of the dish came from ginger, turmeric, and cardamom.Photo by Maria C. AscarrunzI found the service here very competent, if a bit distant. The servers we had both times were quiet women, friendly enough, but there is no hovering at your table, and questions about the food are answered briefly. Which is not a complaint; it’s just not what we’re used to in this neighborhood where each dish is described as if it merited its own table of contents.Photo by Maria C. AscarrunzI’m so happy that such a wonderfully diverse cuisine exists in our neighborhood, and can’t wait to go back to try many more of Café Ethiopia’s dishes.Café Ethiopia878 Valencia St, San Francisco, CA 94110Phone:(415) 285-2728 I hadn’t had Ethiopian food in at least 19 years. My first couple – and last – times were in Berkeley, at one or another of the ubiquitous Ethiopian/Eritrean restaurants that line Telegraph Ave.   I’m conflating the two cuisines because, although they do share a common heritage, my experiences back then left me feeling that the food always pretty much tasted the same – between the food of the two countries, but also between dishes. This could have been because of my own palate deficiencies, or maybe those places just weren’t that good.Café Ethiopia made a big culinary difference for me. This modest, home-spun, family run Ethiopian restaurant has been in the same location for at least 19 years. It’s a pleasant space, clean and cool, with tile floors and Ethiopian art and posters on the walls. There’s a cozy room in the back for bigger parties, too, and this is an excellent cuisine for sharing food with many.Photo by Maria C. AscarrunzEthiopia’s most typical dish is also an eating utensil – injera. Injera is a spongy, sourdough form of bread, rather like a pancake-y flat bread, usually made of teff flour – teff being a tiny grass grain high in fiber and iron. Injera is used as a plate and as a fork – various stew-like dishes are served on a sheet of injera, and folded sheets of injera are provided on the side to scoop the food up – forks are optional here. I love the sour taste of injera, as it plays so well with the rich and sometimes spicy flavors of the cuisine. And eating with your hands is good for you! Or, at least, it’s good fun.center_img 0%last_img read more

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Local Hairstylist Rallies Support for Standing Rock

first_img Tags: Native American • protests Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0% 0% But in recent weeks, Santiago’s calling has shifted from the role of cultural ambassador to that of an activist. She is currently asking her customers for donations – blankets, thermals, jackets, scarves and financial contributions  – to send along with family members headed to North Dakota, where they plan to stand in solidarity with another native tribe in its ongoing resistance to a $3.7 billion pipeline project, slated to be built on their sacred lands.For the last few months, members of North Dakota’s Standing Rock Sioux tribe and their allies have protested the Dakota Access Pipeline because they say developers bypassed a tribal approval process.Intended to transport some 570,000 of oil across four states daily, the pipeline’s construction imperils the drinking water of a nearby reservation. Hundreds of protesters from across the country have trekked to camps along the Missouri River, near the Standing Rock reservation in North Dakota. Among the protesters are Santiago’s brother and sister, and a third sibling will make the journey this month – Santiago hopes to collect as many donations as she can to send along with her.  “We have a really small window this month to get these things out there,” said Santiago. “Winter is coming, and the winters are harsh out there.”Along with winter clothes and camping gear, Santiago is asking her customers to donate water. Reports from her brother, who recently returned from Standing Rock, and others who remain there, about infiltrators in the encampments have left her fearing for the protester’s safety.“They need help,” said Santiago. “I’ve been hearing that certain people have been sneaking  in there, pretending that they are there to help but they are not. They are poisoning or doing something to the drinking water there.”Santiago said that she is frustrated but not surprised with how little attention the large-scale, peaceful protest has received by mainstream media.To date, numerous protesters have been arrested, and social media has been the biggest tool in documenting the happenings inside of the camps. Santiago said her brother reported that some protesters were maced by the pipeline’s company’s private security guards. “ [Police] are stopping people at a checkpoints, putting things in their cars, then saying ‘you are terrorists,” she said. “The media is not reporting on that.”Santiago cannot join the protesters because she is caring for her mother, but said she is hoping to help out in other ways.The hairstylist said that her own parents collected necessities to support Native American protesters during the 1969 Occupation of Alcatraz for land rights.“My parents went around and asked for water, clothes, other provisions, then we would take it down to the boat,” she said.Santiago remembers her childhood home at 17th and Utah streets as being a safe space for native people – or anyone– in need. “We let stay whoever needed a place to stay,” she said. When asked what she hopes that her customers  will take away from conversations about Standing Rock, Santiago said she aims to instill them with “compassion.”“Have compassion for who we are as native people, and have compassion for the land,” she said. “We are the caregivers of our land. It’s not only about allowing us to be on our land, it’s about letting us be. center_img As the name of the hair salon fittingly suggests, customers who walk through the doors of The Hair Place and More at 3166 22nd St., are usually in for much more than a trim.A mural depicting indigenous traditions decorates the wall opposite the salon’s entrance and is placed intentionally to greet customers and to evoke questions. Handmade jewelry and native artwork exhibited on its wall space give the salon a bit of a gallery feel.“I’ve had young people come in – they are Navajo and Pueblo tribe descendants– to paint my mural because I needed something that reflected who I am,” explained proprietor Debbie Santiago, a descendant of both Nevada’s Washoe Tribe and the Midwestern Osage Nation. For some four decades, the 54-year old Mission resident has used the space to showcase her Native American ancestry. “I feel that it is my calling to educate people,” she said.last_img read more

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Spin spurned Scooter company shut out of city permitting process loses its

first_imgA San Francisco official has spurned an appeal from Spin, the first of three electric scooter companies that complained they were improperly shut out of San Francisco’s burgeoning market.James Doyle, a hearing officer with the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, yesterday upheld the SFMTA’s denial of a permit to Spin while, at the same time, suggesting the agency “seriously consider” allowing Spin to vie for permits in the near future.San Francisco became the nexus of an improbable international story in March 2018, when Spin, Lime, Bird, and other e-scooter companies began deploying their vehicles on the city’s streets and sidewalks — sans permission. This, per Doyle’s Jan. 29 ruling, was done in an “unsightly and haphazard fashion” as the e-scooters “were generally obstructing if not endangering pedestrian foot traffic.”In May, San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors outlawed unpermitted scooters being left on the street — which, essentially, put a temporary kibosh on all scooters, as it was only then that the SFMTA began to devise a permitting program. In August, Scoot and Skip emerged as the only two companies among 12 applicants to win the SFMTA’s e-scooter golden ticket. Each company is entitled to place up to 625 scooters on city streets for the first six months of this yearlong pilot program; that cap could potentially double within the coming weeks. Subscribe to Mission Local’s daily newsletter Email Addresscenter_img Spin, Lime, and Jump objected to both the permitting process and their being shut out of it, and filed grievances. Yesterday’s ruling was the first to reach a decision. And, while each company was rejected on different grounds and, presumably, appealed on different grounds, Doyle’s decision does not portend well for the other aggrieved scooter outfits.Toward the end of his 9-page ruling, he states that he “disagrees with Spin’s contention that the application and evaluation process the SFMTA created was unfair to Spin or any of the other applicants” (emphasis ours). Spin — as well as Lime and Jump — had complained that the system was rigged against them due to “past experience including compliance with applicable law and its efforts to ensure compliance of its users with applicable laws” being a factor in the evaluations (and this standard applies to the rideshare companies like Lyft or Uber that own scooter outfits)Doyle also found that SFMTA Director Ed Reiskin did not, as Spin alleged, exhibit “animosity” against the scooter company; Doyle found that Reiskin neither “supported or opposed any particular permit applicant or showed bias toward any particular outcome.” While the SFMTA’s process “can be questioned as lacking the kind of specific direction that most prospective applicants might need and want,” Doyle still found it was not “arbitrary, capricious, or illogical.”While the hearing officer found the SFMTA was within its rights to deny Spin an initial permit, he added that “Spin has the capacity to meet each of the terms of the Pilot Program. … On this basis, I recommend that SFMTA seriously consider issuing a Pilot Program permit to Spin” if and when the agency deigns to allow more scooters on the streets.Spin chose to focus on the silver linings.“We were heartened by the Hearing Officer’s strong recommendation that Spin be granted a permit by the SFMTA at the six-month mark of the pilot,” the company said via statement. “While it’s disappointing that Spin can’t immediately serve our hometown, we appreciate the Hearing Officer’s acknowledgment of our experience and capabilities, and we look forward to working with the SFMTA to serve more San Franciscans with an alternative mobility mode and hire locally from the community.”In the meantime, the City Attorney’s office is taking this as a win, too.“We’re pleased the hearing officer validated the SFMTA’s approach,” said John Coté, a spokesman for the City Attorney’s office. Spin’s claim that the process was unfair is simply not supported by the facts. The hearing officer specifically found that there was no evidence the SFMTA showed animosity against Spin or bias in favor of any particular outcome. The SFMTA designed a fair, thoughtful and reasonable program.” last_img read more

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Alex Walmsley has set himself a target as he conti

first_imgAlex Walmsley has set himself a target as he continues his long recovery from injury.The big prop fractured his neck back in March and is now in training as he looks to play again this year.Whilst no date has been set for his return, the fact he is up and running is a welcome sight – and a real step forward from how he felt when he suffered the injury at Warrington.“Warrington were close to our line and we wanted to keep them out,” Alex recalls. “I attempted to make a tackle and got it all wrong with my head going in an unnatural position causing the injury. I had shooting pains down my arm and my instincts told me I’d done something bad, but I wasn’t aware how bad.“Over the weekend I stiffened up, had pain down my arm and couldn’t move my neck from side to side. I didn’t know how bad it was until after my scan and Nathan Mill, our physio, called me to say I’d broken my neck. He told me not to panic but it was a shock.”He continued: “The stigma of an injury like that sends your mind into overdrive. You think about whether you will ever be able to play again … will you be able to pick up your son … will you be able to walk if the operation goes wrong … all sorts of things.“It was pretty scary at the time but I began to feel better mentally when the operation was booked in and done. After the initial scan they said I would make a full recovery – but until you have the operation there is an uncertainty at what the prognosis would be.“I have to say that the staff at the Alexandra in Cheadle were fantastic and the surgeon, John Leach, was superb. Afterwards he said it was a success and that got me in a good mindset.”From there, Alex began his recovery, which started with something he isn’t that used to – not moving!“I was told to have bed rest for two weeks,” he continues. “For someone who is physically active, being told to sit in bed with a neck brace on is very challenging! It was also tough not being able to pick up my son.“I was told I couldn’t lift anything for those two weeks – and then afterwards only light duties for another month. He’s a big boy is Atticus so not being able to pick him up for six weeks was tough.“You need the support of your loved ones at times like these and I was lucky to have that.”Now the focus is on getting fit and hopefully returning for the business end of the season.Alex has played five times for the club this year and believes his intense rehab will stand him in good stead.“It’s all about ripping in and I’m already feeling better for it,” he adds. “I’m now in at the deep end. It’s been tough but you get out what you put in.“I’ve been given the opportunity to work on things that I wouldn’t usually be able to in season. Nathan, Ally McFarland, Ollie Ersser and Ade Gardner have been working with me to make sure I come back quicker, more powerful and more mobile than ever before.“I believe all these things will help improve my game.“Before the operation, the surgeon wrote off my year. That was tough to hear but I tried to look on the bright side; at least he wasn’t writing off my career.“My rehab has gone well and the surgeon is happy with how well I have responded. I think I have surprised him.“Now we have set a target of being back this year. A lot will depend on a scan I have at the end of July but hopefully I will get a green light.“I believe this team has the chance of winning more than one piece of silverware this season and hopefully I will be able to help them at the back end of the year.”last_img read more

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Trial starts for man accused of kidnapping 6yearold

first_imgNEW HANOVER COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — Trial began this morning for the man accused of kidnapping a 6-year-old in New Hanover County in 2016.Twelve jurors and three alternates were chosen from Sampson County for the trial of Douglas Edwards.- Advertisement – According to search warrants, Edwards, a convicted sex offender, admitted to taking the girl from the front yard of her home off of Carolina Beach Road.Edwards is now charged with a felony county of intimidating a witness. He also faces charges for attempted murder, kidnapping and indecent liberties with a child among other counts.Opening statements begin first. The ADA summed up what happened and who would be testifying. The ADA also said she was tethered to the ground so she couldn’t stand up. The ADA showed jury the chain that he said was wrapped around her neck twice.Related Article: Murder suspect in Wilmington shooting being held without bondThe defense told the jury they agree with most of what the DA said except for some of the charges. The defense said the DA overcharged and Edwards is not guilty of everything he is charged with.The child’s mother took the stand for the state first.The mother has three kids and has lived in Wilmington for 10 years.Mom starts describing what she was doing on September 14, 2016. She said her son was inside who was doing his homework. She said she was outside playing with her two daughters. She said her son kept yelling “Mom, help me with my homework please.”The mother said she asked her daughters to come inside, but they did not want to. She said she went inside and left the door open for the girls. The mother said she sat down and started looking at her son’s homework and then one of her daughters came running in saying a man had taken her sister.The mother said she grabbed her cell phone and ran around the house looking for her daughter, but she was not there. Then, she said she called police. Mother said she spoke with police that night.The mom said the next time she saw her daughter was the following day at the hospital.The prosecutor asked the mom to tell them about her child’s sleeping habits after this happened. The mother said her child does not sleep well. She also said her daughter is always on guard especially around men. She said the child thinks men are all bad.Mom said before the child was always sharing and gracious and always noticing people around her. Now the mom said, the child does not want to be outside.Master Deputy Timothy Hudson with the New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office took the stand next. Hudson responded to the child’s home after the first 911 call was made.Hudson said he began interviews with the family. He said they had some kind of suspect description and initially a motorcycle description. He said it took about 10 or 20 minutes before they had a new description of a moped.Hudson said several other deputies and detectives began looking. They also set up a command center for this case.Then, the state called Detective Gina Jones with New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office to the stand. Jones said she got to the victim’s house around 5:00 p.m. on Sept. 14, 2016. She said there were a lot of people there and lots of chaos.After court took a break for lunch, a witness who lives in Carolina Beach, Marty Rivenbark, took the stand. Rivenbark told the court he doesn’t know Edwards but knew of him from working with his previously.Rivenbark testified that he was by Walmart when he noticed a moped with a girl frolicking like she was bout to fall off, wrestling with the driver and he knew something was wrong.During questioning, the defense said Rivenbark’s testimony is different than what he originally told police.Sgt. Larry Ward with Carolina Beach Police then took the stand and described where he sent his officers to search for the girl. About an hour after the “BOLO” was issued, he saw a white male on a moped and reported it as suspicious. He stopped Edwards and asked him where he was coming from. Ward testified that Edwards told him he was coming from work and heading to the store to buy cigarettes for his mother.Ward said Edwards allowed him to take his picture, which he then sent to fellow officers/detectives and ran his plates. Ward told the court that at the time, he didn’t believe Edwards was a suspect because the “BOLO” was for a black or hispanic male.After he let Edwards go, Ward testified that he thought to himself, “Did we let him slip through our fingers?”When asked by the defense how Edwards was when he pulled him over, Ward said he was polite.Another Carolina Beach Police Officer took the stand and testified he pulled Edwards over once he crossed the Snows Cut bridge.Lisa Hudson with New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office then testified she came down to speak with Edwards and asked if he would come to the detection division for an interview.The day ended with the jury watching a video of that interview.last_img read more

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Hundreds of bikes given to children before the holidays

first_imgWILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — Presents came early for nearly 800 children who wanted a new bike. The organization A Bike for Every Child held their largest bike giveaway of the year Saturday afternoon.Hundreds of families lined up to let their little one pick out a bike to take home.- Advertisement – A Bike for Every Child collected close to 800 bikes for their giveaway.  With the help of the community and everyone who donated new or gently used bicycles put smiles on many children’s faces.The organization also gave away new helmets to every new bike owner.One new bike owner said she is excited to test out her new gift.Related Article: Proposed bill would require bikes driven on NC roads to be registered“I picked the bike that has purple on it with cool designs and my favorite thing to do on my bike is ride it,” Naziyah Cromartie said.After the children picked out their new ride they went through a safety training course learning rules of the road, the proper way to wear their helmet and how to repair and maintain their new set of wheels.last_img read more

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Man wanted in Bolivia shooting in custody

first_imgPatrick Noah Mitchell (Photo: BCSO) BRUNSWICK COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — A man wanted in connection with a shooting in a Brunswick County is behind bars.Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office says it happened around 6 p.m. Monday night on Adelaide Drive in Bolivia.- Advertisement – As of Tuesday afternoon, Patrick Noah Mitchell, 23, was in custody.Mitchell is charged with discharging a weapon into a occupied dwelling/moving vehicle and failure to appear on misdemeanor.He is in jail under a $32,500 bond.last_img read more

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Trump issues disaster declaration for North Carolina

first_imgFrying Pan Tower flag blowing on Oct. 11, 2018 during Tropical Storm Michael. (Photo: Explore.org) WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump has approved a major disaster declaration for North Carolina to provide for federal assistance to areas impacted by Tropical Storm Michael last fall.The declaration was announced in a news release issued Thursday and covers 21 counties statewide. It provides federal funding for state and local government and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged Oct. 10 to 12 by the tropical storm.- Advertisement – Counties affected by the declaration are Alamance, Brunswick, Caswell, Chatham, Dare, Davidson, Davie, Forsyth, Granville, Hyde, Iredell, McDowell, Montgomery, Orange, Person, Randolph, Rockingham, Stokes, Surry, Vance and Yadkin.Hurricane Michael slammed into Florida’s Panhandle with 155 mph (250 kph) winds on Oct. 10 and also blew through Georgia, the Carolinas and Virginia.(Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)last_img read more

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NC Schools Superintendent salutes local educational heroes

first_imgWINNABOW, NC (WWAY) — Six months past Hurricane Florence, North Carolina State Superintendent Mark Johnson is still touring schools impacted by the hurricane and thanking local heroes in education.Town Creek Elementary School was one of the hardest hit schools in Brunswick County. Students were out of school until mid-October.- Advertisement – “We still have a long road to recovery,” said Johnson. “There’s still a lot of students that had a very traumatic experience so we have to be sure we’re giving them the supports they need. We still have students that don’t have a home. We have to make sure that we are helping to rebuild the entire community and that’s why we’re here at the 6 month anniversary.”Friday, Johnson spoke with students, toured the schools remaining damage, distributed books to students and made a special thank you to cafeteria staff.Johnson says he is excited state leaders are working on a future with better educational facilities across eastern North Carolina.Related Article: Affordable temporary housing poses challenge for evacuated renters“There’s going to be more money coming from the state whether its through a program where we simply take funds and disburse it to schools who need it most first or through a bond referendum that’s given to voters to approve,” said Johnson.Brunswick County has been awarded over $3 million in disaster recovery funds and over $70 million in funds have been distributed across the state.“We have an urban-rural divide in North Carolina,” said Johnson. “The best way to close that urban-rural divide is to make sure that every student no matter where they live, no matter their income, no matter if they’re in the most rural or urban counties has the opportunities to go to school, work hard and succeed.”last_img read more

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How a 16yearold Kid Made His First Million Dollars Following His Hero

first_imgAdvertisement The page sold a package of very neat Mac OS X applications for a discounted price and for a limited time. He would negotiate with the developers to get a discount deal on their apps. The resulting bundle had a combined retail value of around $400, but he would sell it for a tenth of that price. (You know, like MacHeist, which we’ve featured before.)Not only that: If enough people bought the package, a new application would get unlocked for all buyers, which guaranteed very good word-of-mouth promotion. And to top it all, Owens dedicated a percentage of all sales to charity.The idea did well. Very well, in fact: In its first two years, Mac Bundle Box made $1,000,000 (700,000 British Pounds). – Advertisement – Not happy with that success, Owens jumped into a new venture called Branchr, a pay-per-click advertising company that distributes 300 million ads per month on over 17,500 websites, iPhone, and Android applications. The company, which claims to deliver “contextual, behavioral, publisher-defined, and geographically” targeted ads in those platforms, has already made $800,000 in its first year and employs eight adults including his 43-year-old mother, Alison.He doesn’t know where he would be in 10 years, but the next thing he wants to do is to make one hundred million British pounds with Branchr. He seems to be on his way to success. He claims his business is growing strong—Branchr has already bought another company—and he reinvests all the money back into the company.His secret to success? There’s no secret, he says:There is no magical formula to business, it takes hard work, determination and the drive to do something great.And also copying MacHeist.In an age of idiotized kids who can’t focus on anything, we salute you, Christian!Source: http://gizmodo.com/last_img read more

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