Author: admin

More than half of Slovenians will spend their summers on the Adriatic

first_imgMore than half of Slovenians who go on holiday in July and August will spend their summers on the Adriatic, and Croatian tourist centers remain their most popular destination, according to a traditional poll published by Ljubljana’s Delo before the holiday season. ”Transmits Hina. When asked which countries they most often go on holiday to and whether it will be the same this year, 45 percent of respondents mentioned Croatia as their favorite destination, 24 percent Slovenia, 4 percent Western European countries, and 3 percent Greece. More than 100 of the 400 respondents said they would spend their summers at sea, a tenth would travel to Slovenia or Western Europe, and 6 per cent decided to rest in the Slovenian mountains, according to a poll published by the paper on Monday.According to the data of the Croatian National Tourist Board, in 2015 the largest number of arrivals and overnight stays of Slovenian guests was realized – 1.294.600 arrivals and 8.203.285 overnight stays. That is an increase in arrivals by 6,5 percent and overnight stays by 4,8 percent compared to 2014, and the announcements for this season are also promising. One third plans to spend around 500 Euros, almost the same number will spend 1.000 Euros, while one part of the respondents even spend 2.000 Euros.Source: Delo / Hinalast_img read more

Read More

Find out which are the 10 best hotels in Split

first_imgIf anything will mark this tourist season, it will certainly be the confirmation of Split as an established star of Croatian tourism, which in just a few years has reached the status of one of the most desirable European summer tourist destinations. Instagram is full of photos from Split’s old town, and Facebook and Twitter users do not stop writing hymns about Split and its tourist, catering and entertainment offer.That Split is truly an increasingly popular tourist destination is evidenced by the increasingly rich and diverse offer of hotel accommodation in and around Split through the opening of new hotel facilities and improving the quality of existing ones. A popular brand of travel guides SEE Travel Guides thus, he advises tourists who come to Split to stay in one of the ten separate Split hotels, among which the hotels in the higher and high category are in the lead.As stated, the list of the best hotels in Split was created by collecting and carefully analyzing the ratings and comments of guests on the world’s most popular booking portals. List of the best hotels in Split according to VIDI Travel Guides: Radisson Blu Resort Split ,Hotel Atrium, Hotel Park Split, Hotel Marmont, Hotel Cornaro, Vestibul Palace Hotel, Hotel Fanat, Hotel Diocletian, Piazza Heritage Hotel and Hotel Marul.According to official data, Split is well on its way to breaking old records this tourist season as well. Namely, in the first eight months of this year, Split recorded an increase in the number of tourist arrivals (25% more) and overnight stays (32% more) compared to the same period last year, while Split-Dalmatia County was visited by 2,2 million in the first eight months. tourists who realized 12,4 million overnight stays.If these data are added to the increasingly rich offer of hotel accommodation and numerous announcements about the opening of new hotels in Split and its surroundings in 2017, it is to be expected that Split can have another sensational tourist season next year as well.You can see the full list of the 10 best hotels herelast_img read more

Read More

By merging the holidays in 2017 to as many as 61 non-working days. An opportunity for the tourism sector?

first_imgCroatians are known for combining holidays with extended weekends, and while the holidays in 2016 mostly fell for the weekend, in 2017, with 26 days a year, we can combine as many as 61 non-working days. Great for both employees in Croatia and the tourism sector.Study the holiday dates well and arrange interesting, full of content and attractive tourist “weekend” packages for certain target groups. In order for guests to come to your accommodation or tourist destination you must first make a good story and invite them. Don’t let the guests look for you on their own, because the competition doesn’t sleep, and there is too much noise in communication anyway, so it’s hard to stand out in the forest of offers. Also, invest in quality content in tourist destinations because with quality content you create the motive of arrival, consumption is generated as well as earnings for all participants – Win-win for all.And don’t forget, sell stories, emotions and experiences because accommodation is never a motive for arrivals, but a destination.Holidays in 201706. 01. – Friday – Holy Three KingsApril 17 – Monday – Easter Monday01. 05. – Monday – Labor Day15. 06. – Thursday -BodyJune 22 – Thursday – Day of the anti-fascist struggle15. 08. – Tuesday – AssumptionNovember 01 – Wednesday – All Saints’ DayDecember 25 – 26 – Monday, Tuesday – Christmas and St. Stephenlast_img read more

Read More

Scientists tackle our addiction to salt and fat by altering foods’ pore size, number

first_imgPinterest Share Share on Facebook Regarding salt, Lee said, “Six in 10 American adults either have high blood pressure or are on the borderline of this diagnosis largely because they eat too much salt. Overconsuming salt is also associated with the development and severity of cardiovascular and bone diseases, kidney stones, gastric cancer, and asthma.”Because 70 percent of the salt Americans consume comes from processed foods, Lee began to study the relationship between the microstructural properties of these foods and the way salt is released when it is chewed.“Much of the salt that is added to these foods is not released in our mouths where we can taste it, and that means the rest of the salt is wasted,” he said. “We wanted to alter porosity in processed food, targeting a certain fat-protein emulsion structure, to see if we could get more of the salt released during chewing. Then food manufacturers won’t have to add as much salt as before, but the consumer will taste almost the same amount of saltiness.”Increasing porosity also changed the way the foods broke apart when they were chewed, exposing more surface area and increasing saltiness, he said.“When foods crumble easily, we further reduce the amount of salt that is needed. Changing the number or size of pores in the food’s surface can help us to accomplish this,” he said.Takhar said that his porous media approach to understanding the behavior of water, oil, and gas during frying will help create strategies that optimize the frying process, reduce oil uptake, and produce lower-fat foods.The articles Takhar publishes in academic journals feature page after page of complex mathematical equations that describe the physics involved in the transport of fluids and in textural changes in foods. These equations then guide the simulations that he performs in his laboratory.“Frying is such a complicated process involving more than 100 equations. In a matter of seconds, when you put the food in the fryer, water starts evaporating, vapors form and escape the surface, oil penetration starts, and heat begins to rise while at the same time there’s evaporative cooling off at different points in the food. Some polymers in the food matrix may also change their state, and chemical reactions can occur. It’s not an easy set of changes to describe,” he said.Within 40 seconds of frying, the texture of gently fried processed foods like crackers is fully developed, the scientist said. “That’s the cracker’s peak texture. Any longer and you’re just allowing more oil to penetrate the food.“A lot of frying research has focused on capillary pressure in the oil phase of the process, but we have found that capillary pressure in the water phase also critically affects oil uptake,” Takhar said.Capillary pressure makes overall pore pressure negative, and that negative pressure tends to suck oil from inside. His simulations show when that pressure is becoming more negative.“The trick is to stop when pore pressure is still positive (or less negative)–that is, when oil has had less penetration. Of course, other variables such as moisture level, texture, taste, and structure formation, must be monitored as well. It’s an optimization problem,” he noted.When this exquisite balance is achieved, lower-fat, healthier fried foods are the result, he added. LinkedIncenter_img Two University of Illinois food scientists have learned that understanding and manipulating porosity during food manufacturing can affect a food’s health benefits.Youngsoo Lee reports that controlling the number and size of pores in processed foods allows manufacturers to use less salt while satisfying consumers’ taste buds. Pawan Takhar has found that meticulously managing pore pressure in foods during frying reduces oil uptake, which results in lower-fat snacks without sacrificing our predilection for fried foods’ texture and taste.Both scientists are experts in food engineering and professors in the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences’ Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition. Email Share on Twitterlast_img read more

Read More

Children exposed to multiple languages may be better natural communicators

first_imgLinkedIn Share Young children who hear more than one language spoken at home become better communicators, a new study from University of Chicago psychologists finds. Effective communication requires the ability to take others’ perspectives. Researchers discovered that children from multilingual environments are better at interpreting a speaker’s meaning than children who are exposed only to their native tongue. The most novel finding is that the children do not even have to be bilingual themselves; it is the exposure to more than one language that is the key for building effective social communication skills.Previous studies have examined the effects of being bilingual on cognitive development. This study, published online May 8 by the journal Psychological Science, is the first to demonstrate the social benefits of just being exposed to multiple languages.“Children in multilingual environments have extensive social practice in monitoring who speaks what to whom, and observing the social patterns and allegiances that are formed based on language usage,” explained Katherine Kinzler, associate professor of psychology and an expert on language and social development. “These early socio-linguistic experiences could hone children’s skills at taking other people’s perspectives and provide them tools for effective communication.” Pinterest Share on Facebookcenter_img Email Share on Twitter Study co-author Boaz Keysar, professor of psychology and an internationally known expert on communication and cognition, said this study is part of a bigger research program that attempts to explain how humans learn to communicate. “Children are really good at acquiring language. They master the vocabulary and the syntax of the language, but they need more tools to be effective communicators,” said Keysar. “A lot of communication is about perspective taking, which is what our study measures.”Keysar, Kinzler and their co-authors, doctoral students in psychology Samantha Fan and Zoe Liberman, had 72 4- to 6- year- old children participate in a social communication task. The children were from one of three language backgrounds: monolinguals (children who heard and spoke only English and had little experience with other languages); exposures (children who primarily heard and spoke English, but they had some regular exposure to speakers of another language); and bilinguals (children who were exposed to two languages on a regular basis and were able to speak and understand both languages). There were 24 children in each group.Each child who participated sat on one side of a table across from an adult and played a communication game that required moving objects in a grid. The child was able to see all of the objects, but the adult on the other side of the grid had some squares blocked and could not see all the objects. To make sure that children understood that the adult could not see everything, the child first played the game from the adult’s side.For the critical test, the adult would ask the child to move an object in the grid. For example, she would say, “I see a small car, could you move the small car?” The child could see three cars: small, medium and large. The adult, however, could only see two cars: the medium and the large ones. To correctly interpret the adult’s intended meaning, the child would have to take into account that the adult could not see the smallest car, and move the one that the adult actually intended–the medium car.The monolingual children were not as good at understanding the adult’s intended meaning in this game, as they moved the correct object only about 50 percent of the time. But mere exposure to another language improved children’s ability to understand the adult’s perspective and select the correct objects. The children in the exposure group selected correctly 76 percent of the time, and the bilingual group took the adult’s perspective in the game correctly 77 percent of the time.“Language is social,” noted Fan. “Being exposed to multiple languages gives you a very different social experience, which could help children develop more effective communication skills.”Liberman added, “Our discovery has important policy implications, for instance it suggests previously unrealized advantages for bilingual education.”Some parents seem wary of second-language exposure for their young children, Kinzler commented. Yet, in addition to learning another language, their children might unintentionally be getting intensive training in perspective taking, which could make them better communicators in any language.last_img read more

Read More

Staring into someone’s eyes for 10 minutes can induce hallucinations, study finds

first_imgShare on Twitter There’s a new kind of high you can get — legally — no drugs required. According to a recent study published in the journal Psychiatry Research, staring into someone’s eyes for 10 minutes can induce hallucinations, from seeing distorted faces to monsters. Eye contact is seen as a great way to foster intimacy, because you can… Email Share on Facebook Pinterest LinkedIn Sharelast_img

Read More

Study: How depressive thoughts persevere, interfere with memory in people with depression

first_imgIntrusive, enduring, depressive thoughts are an ever-present part of daily life for people with depression. A first of its kind study from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas published earlier this year in the Journal of Affective Disorders shows that depressive thoughts are maintained for longer periods of time for people with depressed mood, and this extended duration may reduce the amount of information that these individuals can hold in their memory. The findings have far-reaching implications for understanding how depression damages memory, as well as how depression develops and persists over the course of an individual’s lifetime.“People with depression or even healthy people with a depressed mood can be affected by depressive thoughts,” explained Center for BrainHealth principal investigator Bart Rypma, Ph.D., who also holds the Meadows Foundation Chair at UT Dallas. “We have known that negative thoughts tend to last longer for those with depression. However, this study is unique in showing that, these thoughts, triggered from stimuli in the environment, can persist to the point that they hinder a depressed person’s ability to keep their train of thought.”For the study, researchers recruited 75 university undergraduate students; thirty students were classified as having depressive symptoms and 45 participants were categorized as not exhibiting depressive symptoms. All participants were asked to respond to a sentence featuring depressive thoughts, such as “I am sad,” or “People don’t like me,” or neutral information. They were then asked to remember a string of numbers. Share on Twitter LinkedIn Share on Facebook Pinterestcenter_img Email Share Individuals with depressed mood forgot more number strings than people without depressed mood when responding to a sentence with negative information. People with depressed mood who were given the depressive thought first, remembered 31% fewer number strings, compared to people without depressed mood, and people with depressed mood who were given the number string first.“We all have a fixed amount of information we can hold in memory at one time,” explained the study’s lead author, Nick Hubbard, a doctoral candidate at the Center for BrainHealth working with Dr. Rypma. “The fact that depressive thoughts do not seem to go away once they enter memory certainly explains why depressed individuals have difficulty concentrating or remembering things in their daily lives. This preoccupation of memory by depressive thoughts might also explain why more positive thoughts are often absent in depression; there simply is not enough space for them.”The authors suggest that this greater dedication of memory resources to depressive thoughts and consequently, an impoverished ability to hold positive thoughts in memory, might be the key to understanding how depression develops and continues throughout an individual’s lifespan.“Interventions such as mindfulness-based cognitive therapy are quite successful in empowering depressed people to recognize and better regulate the content of their thoughts,” said Dr. Rypma. “Our goal is to continue to study how such therapeutic approaches can alter the depressed brain and how these alterations might result in better memory and outcomes for persons with depression.”last_img read more

Read More

New study: Leading cause of blindness could be prevented or delayed

first_imgIn a major scientific breakthrough, a drug used to treat Parkinson’s and related diseases may be able to delay or prevent macular degeneration, the most common form of blindness among older Americans.The findings, published in the American Journal of Medicine, are a groundbreaking effort in the fight against age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which affects as many as 11 million Americans. AMD hinders central vision, and even when it does not lead to blindness it can severely reduce the ability to read, drive, and recognize faces.In the study, supported in part by BrightFocus Foundation, researchers discovered a biological connection between darker pigmented eyes, which are known to be resistant to AMD, and increased levels of a chemical called L-DOPA in those eyes. Since L-DOPA is frequently prescribed for Parkinson’s patients, the researchers wanted to know whether patients who received the drug L-DOPA as treatment for Parkinson’s or other diseases were protected from AMD. By combing through massive databases of medical chart data, they reported that patients receiving L-DOPA were significantly less likely to get AMD, and when they did, its onset was significantly delayed. Email Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Sharecenter_img Pinterest LinkedIn “Rather than looking at what might cause AMD, we instead wondered why certain people are protected from AMD. This approach had never been done before,” says senior author Brian McKay of the University of Arizona.The research findings are based off an analysis of the medical records of 37,000 patients at the Marshfield Clinic in Wisconsin. Because the average age of those given L-DOPA is 67, while the average age of AMD diagnosis is 71, scientists were able to effectively track patterns. These major findings were then confirmed by reviewing a data set of 87 million patients. In this large scale data set, L-DOPA also delayed or prevented AMD from progressing to its “wet” form, the most devastating form of the disease.“This exciting breakthrough shows the power of scientific discovery to give hope to millions of people across the nation and the world. Their methodology is a reminder that ‘big data’ is not a buzzword – it is a bold and innovative new approach to science,” said BrightFocus president and CEO Stacy Pagos Haller.The next steps for the team of scientists is to launch a clinical trial to further test the ability of this drug to prevent AMD. The title of their research paper is “Mining Retrospective Data for Virtual Prospective Drug Repurposing: L-DOPA and Age-related Macular Degeneration.”last_img read more

Read More

Username predicts some aspects of gamer’s personality in online League of Legends matches

first_imgShare on Twitter LinkedIn What’s in a name? In the case of the usernames of video gamers, a remarkable amount of information about their real world personalities, according to research by psychologists at the University of York.Analysis of anonymised data from one of the world’s most popular computer games by scientists in the Department of Psychology at York also revealed information about their ages.Professor Alex Wade and PhD student Athanasios Kokkinakis, a PhD student on the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council-funded Intelligent Games and Game Intelligence (IGGI) project, analysed data from League of Legends, a game played by around 70 million people worldwide.. Share Emailcenter_img Share on Facebook Pinterest The researchers say that mining of video game data could become an important area of research into the personalities of players, as well as potentially providing evidence of clinical disorders such as autism, sociopathy or addictive personality. The research is published in Computers in Human Behavior.The developer of League of Legends, Riot Games provided 500,000 data points for the analysis. These anonymised data contained user names, information on the in-game behaviour of players and the reaction of other gamers – the latter from the post-match ‘Honour’ and ‘Report’ feedback each player can file. The study is the first to use this methodology to examine player interaction in a multiplayer online battle arena (MOBA) game.The researchers found that where a player incorporated a profanity or other anti-social expression in their user name, they tended to adopt similar anti-social behaviour in the game environment. Conversely, they found that positive in-game behaviour such as rapid learning, team building or leadership might correlate both with positive usernames and with positive personality traits in the real world.The psychologists also discovered that where numbers featured in user names, it often provided an indication of the age of players.Professor Wade said: “Video games can provide a wealth of useful population-level information on developmental, cognitive and psychological processes. We found that people who have anti-social names tend to behave in an anti-social way within the game. Younger people behave poorly and older people less so.“This data is like a window on individual players’ personalities so we believe that we might be able to use video games a way of testing people’s personalities.”Athanasios Kokkinakis added: “We think this is just the tip of the iceberg – these massive datasets offer an unprecedented tool for studying human psychology across the globe.”last_img read more

Read More

Study finds that our level of wisdom varies depending on the situation

first_imgShare on Facebook Pinterest LinkedIn Share Share on Twittercenter_img While we may think of some people are consistently wise, we actually demonstrate different levels of wisdom from one situation to the next, and factors such as whether we are alone or with friends can affect it, according to new research from the University of Waterloo.The study defines wise reasoning as a combination of such abilities as intellectual humility, consideration of others’ perspective and looking for compromise. The work appears in Social Psychological and Personality Science.“This research does not dismiss that there is a personality component to wisdom, but that’s not the whole picture,” said Professor Igor Grossmann, from the Department of Psychology at Waterloo and lead author of the paper. “Situations in daily life affect our personality and ability to reason wisely.” Email The observation that wise reasoning varies dramatically across situations in daily life suggests that while it fluctuates, wisdom may not be as rare as we think. Further, for different individuals, only certain situations may promote this quality.“There are many examples where people known for their critical acumen or expertise in ethics seem to fall prey to lack of such acumen or morals. The present findings suggest that those examples are not an anomaly,” said Grossmann. “We cannot always be at the top of our game in terms of wisdom-related tendencies, and it can be dangerous to generalize based on whether people show wisdom in their personal life or when teaching others in the classroom .”By examining conditions and situations under which people may or may not show wisdom in their lives, researchers and practitioners may learn more about situations promoting wisdom in daily life and recreating those situations.For the next stage of this work, Grossmann and his team are preparing a tool to assess wisdom according to the situation. They have plans to conduct the first-ever longitudinal study aiming at teaching people to reason wisely in their own lives.last_img read more

Read More